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5 best Caribbean cricketers of Indian origin

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New Delhi: Indian diaspora is the largest in the world according to a report recently released by the United Nations. In Caribbean islands, Indian diaspora is a lot different to others in the world. It is not a new diaspora.

This diaspora consisted of the people sent there by British for sugarcane plantation labor in the mid-eighteenth century. These people, with time, have developed a new identity there. Everything from their accent to their food, from the festival to attire, is not same to India or the other Indian diasporas in the world.

British control brought the cricket wherever they went and the Caribbean islands were no different. These islands made a united cricket team named Westindies. The team is known for its fierce fast bowlers, aggressive batsman and funky style of playing the game. No team in cricket world is as enjoyed a WestIndian team. Between 1970 to 1995, they were by far the best team in the world. They won the first two world cups.

The West Indian team not only had India in its name but some of its greatest cricketers were of Indian origin. We profile 5 of the best and most known Indian-origin Westindies cricketers.

1 Sonny Ramadhin

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The first east Indian to play for the Westindies. An off spinner who turned bowling leg spin in between and with the same control baffled many batsmen. He was a tidy bowler who could bowl long spells. In a test match in England, he bowled 98 overs in an inning which showed his stamina and patience. Ramadhin can be seen sitting on the left. (picture courtesy: espncricinfo.com)

2 Rohan Kanhai

Perhaps one of the greatest batsman that Westindies ever produced. 6000 runs at the average of 47 in the era of uncovered pitches, no helmets speaks volume about Kanhai’s talent. An occasional wicketkeeper, he was overshadowed as the team had greats like Sir Gary Sobers but still his contribution was immense in the making of a world champion team. (picture courtesy: indocaribbeanworld.com)

 

3 Alvin Kallicharan

This little left-handed gutsy fellow was one of the main strength of windies batting line up in the 70s. A career of 66 test matches in which he made more than 4000 test runs at an average of 44 was made of some great batting performance especially on swinging decks in England.

“You have to learn about survival, then think about the opposition”, this quote sums up his career and attitude. (picture courtesy: espncricinfo.com)

4 Shivnarine Chanderpaul

A batsman with the most awkward batting stance but still ended up with the best statistical career after Brian Lara. Almost 12000 runs in test cricket, more than 8000 runs in one day cricket, Chanderpaul played in an era when his team got weaker and weaker only. He could play for time. On 2007 England tour he just refused to lose his wicket. Most of the times he saw wickets falling at the other end in his career. Surprisingly he also smashed a 69-balls test hundred. (picture courtesy: expressnewsgy.com)

5 Ramnaresh Sarwan

 

A batsman picked in his teens was supposed to have a great career. He did play 87 test matches for Westindies but just when he was nearing his peak, controversies ended his career. Sarwan was a batsman who made batting beautiful when in the flow. An average of 40 in test cricket does not do justice with his talent. (picture courtesy: espncricinfo.com)

(image courtesy: guyanatimesinternational.com)

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Trauma in Childhood is Linked to Negative Outcomes in Adulthood

"The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

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The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
A Child in pain, Pixabay

Do you want your children to be happy when they grow up? If yes, then you have to make sure that they are not experiencing any kind of trauma as a child. A new study, including an Indian-origin researcher, suggests that childhood trauma or adversity may trigger physical pain in adulthood.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.

“The findings suggest that early life trauma is leading to adults having more problems with mood and sleep, which in turn lead to them feeling more pain and feeling like pain is interfering with their day,” said co-author Ambika Mathur from the Pennsylvania State University.

But the connection was weaker in those who felt more optimistic and in control of their lives, the researcher said.

“The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

“They may be feeling the same amount or intensity of pain, but they’ve taken control of and are optimistic about not letting the pain interfere with their day,” Mathur added.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
Childhood Trauma can lead to pain in Adulthood, Pixabay

The findings build on previous research that suggests a link between adult physical pain and early-in-life trauma or adversity, which can include abuse or neglect, major illness, financial issues, or loss of a parent, among others, the researcher said.

For the current study, researchers recruited a diverse group of 265 participants who reported some form of adversity in their early lives.

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They answered questions about their early childhood or adolescent adversity, current mood, sleep disturbances, optimism, how in control of their lives they feel, and if they recently felt pain.

The researchers also looked at how optimism or feeling in control could affect how much pain a person experiences.

They found that while participants who showed these forms of resilience didn’t have as strong a connection between trouble sleeping and pain interfering with their day, the resilience didn’t affect the intensity of pain. (IANS)