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5 Most famous Hindu Temples in South East Asia

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Hinduism is not just part of India, It spread into many neighboring countries over the period of time. Here we profile five of the most famous Hindu temples in South East Asia outside India.

ANGKOR WAT, CAMBODIA.  

Angkor Wat before sunset, Cambodia.

The meaning of “Angkor Wat” is the capital temple. It was built in the early 12th century in Cambodia by the King Suryavarman II of Khmer kingdom and it took 27 years to complete the construction. It was earlier called “Varah Vishnu-lok”. This Hindu temple was initially dedicated to Lord Vishnu. Starting in the 14th century, it started hosting Buddhist cultures too. Angkor Wat contains two plans of Khmer temple architecture: the temple mountain and the later galleried temple. It is built in such a way to represent Mount Meru, home of ‘devas’ in the Hindu mythology.

Read more about it here: http://www.newsgram.com/angkor-wat-history-behind-cambodian-hindu-temple/

Image-Unesco

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1. PARAMBAN TEMPLES, JAVA, INDONESIA

The Prambanan temple, situated in Central Java, Indonesia is the largest Hindu temple site in Indonesia and was built in 850 CE. It is also one of the biggest hindu temples in Southeast Asia.

The temple is composed of 8 main shrines called ‘gopuras’ towering 47-metre-high (154 ft). They are further surrounded by 250 smaller gopuras. The walls of the temple are covered with beautiful hand carved art and all the carvings narrate stories of incarnations of Lord Vishnu, the Ramayana, adventures of Lord Hanuman and other Hindu legends. This temple attracts many visitors from across the world.

Image: commons.wikimedia.org

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)