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5 top Indian art and cultural festivals of February

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By Ekta Mal

 

India in February means, the last leg of winters as the cold is preparing to leave the country. During this time, a lot of festivals take place in our country highlighting the arts and culture of the country. Some of them are as follows:

  1. Surajkund International Crafts Mela

Into its 30th year this year, the Surajkund crafts mela showcases the finest handlooms, handicrafts, and Indian cuisine. Over 400 artisans display and demonstrate their crafts from all over India and the world. There are also cultural programs and an amusement zone for children. The mela has a different theme every year. This year the state Telangana  has been chosen to be the theme state.

When: February 1-15 each year

Where: Surajkund, in the Faridabad district a short distance from South Delhi. It’s around 35 minutes drive from the Delhi airport.

2. Kala Ghoda Arts Festival

The Kala Ghoda arts festival  is a nine-day extravaganza  that sees Mumbai’s  Kala Ghoda Arts Precinct  transformed into an open air exhibition space and stage show. This vibrant street festival  includes arts and crafts exhibitions, seminars, dance, music, theatre, heritage walks, and special events for children. The great thing about it is that it’s free!

When: February 6-14,2016

Where: Kala Ghoda Arts Precinct, Fort, Mumbai

  1. Goa Carnival

The colourful Goa carnival, which began as a local feast by the Portuguese in the 18th century, has developed into the state’s most famous event. During the festival, the streets come alive with parades, floats, music, and masked dances. It culminates with the Red and Black Dance, a formal ball in Panaji, where the dress code is red and black. The festivities kick off with a Food and culture festival in Panaji.

When: February 6-9,2016

Where: The carnival moves from city to city(Panaji, Vasco, Mapusa) in Goa. The Parade starts out from Panaji.

  1. Taj Mahotsav

The Taj Mahotsav takes place at Shilpgram in Agra, right near the eastern entry gate to the Taj Mahal. The focus of this festival is on arts, crafts, Indian culture and recreating the Mughal era. It gets underway with a spectacular procession that includes elephants, camels and drummers. Elephant and camel  rides are on offer and there are also games for the kids and a food festival. The venue has special significance, as it’s apparently located on the site where the artisans who built the Taj Mahal once lived. A full programme of events is available on the website.

When: February 18-27 each year

Where: Agra, Uttar Pradesh

  1. Jaisalmer Desert Festival

This exuberant desert festival is a wonderful opportunity to experience the sandstone city of Jaisalmer at its magical best. A parade of camels and fancily dressed locals, camel races and polo matches, turban tying competitions, competitions for the finest facial hair, acrobats, puppeteers and jugglers are all part of this amusing festival.

When: February 20-22, 2016

Where: Jaisalmer Rajasthan

 

Next Story

The Orii Ring Designed by Hong Kong Based Start-Up Seeks to Aid Visually Impaired

The Orii ring is expected to reach the commercial market by February

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The Orii ring
The Orii ring aims to help visually impaired people. Wikimedia
  • The Orii ring was inspired by Peter Wong, the visually impaired father of the firm’s co-founder Kevin Wong
  • It ensures that only the user can hear the information conveyed by the ring
  • The Orii ring is expected to reach the commercial market by February

A voice in your ear at the touch of a hand?

The Orii ring allows people to take phone calls, handle text messages and interact with a phone’s digital assistant, all by transferring sound to a user’s ear through bone conduction.

The ring, designed by Hong Kong-based start-up Origami Labs, was inspired by Peter Wong, the visually impaired father of the firm’s co-founder Kevin Wong.

“As a visually impaired person, I rely on the software on the smartphone to read the icons, the texts to me,” said Peter Wong, who is a technical adviser for the ring.

Origami Labs co-founder Emile Chan poses with an Orii smart ring at Hong Kong Cyberport in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 3, 2017.

A key feature ensures that only the user can hear the information conveyed by the ring.

“Can you imagine it reading out your password? That’s inconvenient and inappropriate,” Peter Wong said.

What began as a Kickstarter project has become the latest example of wearable, screen-free technology.

“We want to keep our heads up, we want to be able to stay more in the moment,” said Kevin Wong, 29, who set up Origami Labs in November 2015 with three friends from university.

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Orii smart rings with various colors are displayed in this illustration photo, at Origami Labs at Hong Kong Cyberport in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 3, 2017.

The tech wearable market grew 51 percent in Asia last year, according to consumer research firm GfK. The overall industry is expected to be worth $34 billion globally by 2020, research provider CCS Insight has said.

The Orii ring is expected to reach the commercial market by February.

(VOA)