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A 1000-year-old and 4.5 ft tall stone statue of 23rd Jain Teerthankar Parshavnath found immersed in Yamuma

Jain religion has an important place in the history of Kaushambi. There is a small museum at Phabhosa village in the district where Jain statues belonging to 9th and 10th centuries are preserved.

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Jainism , peace , non- violence
Jain Teerthankar (Representational Image), Wikimedia

Lucknow, March 15, 2017: Some fisherman in Kaushambi discovered a 4.5 ft tall stone statue of 23rd Jain Teerthankar Parshavnath in the Yamuna which was assumed to be about 1000-year-old. The finding buttresses the evidence that the area was a pivotal hub for the Jains for eons. The statue has now been kept at the popular Jain temple in Kaushambi.

It was revealed that some fisherman at Gurbuj Ghat in Gadhwa Kosam Inam village cast their net to catch fish. When they pulled out the net, a large statue was discovered. Finding it irrelevant they left the statue at the ghat itself which was later noticed by local folks. The villagers notified priest of Prabhashgiri Jain temple Dinesh Jain who identified the statute, mentioned HT.

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Responding on the matter, historian Ranish Jain announced that Kaushambi was one of the most biblical Jain sites where the sixth Jain Teerthankar was born. Mahaveer Swami had also meditated here. A story in Jain text ‘Avashyak Sutra’ suggests that a Jain nun Chandanbala who was sold to a rich man of Kaushambi was later provided food to Mahaveer Swami and became a nun.

Prof of Ancient History at Allahabad University DP Dubey stated the statue may be of 12th century BC. A Large number of members of the Jain community once populated the Pali village in the area.

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Jain religion has an important place in the history of Kaushambi. There is a small museum at Phabhosa village in the district where Jain statues belonging to 9th and 10th centuries are preserved. There may be a temple of Parshavnath on the banks of the Yamuna from where the statue was immersed in the river said the Director of Allahabad Museum Rajesh Purohit.

– Prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram, Twitter @Nainamishr94

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Newspaper Hawkers in Delhi Actively Participate in Cleaning of Yamuna River

Though housands of crores have been spent to clean the river, the pollution levels have shown no serious signs of decline

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yamuna river, newspaper hawkers
After collecting all the waste from the river banks, they dump the collected garbage in the dumpers provided by the East Delhi Municipal Corporation. Wikimedia Commons

The black waters of the Yamuna river on its Delhi stretch have been declared unfit for drinking and bathing purposes, but that did not deter 65-year-old newspaper hawker Ashok Upadhyay to do his bit in protecting the river from further pollution.

On the last Sunday of every month, Upadhyay comes to the Chhath ‘ghat’ (steps) of the river near ITO to clear the waste accumulated on the banks. He is joined by about 100 other newspaper hawkers of the city who have taken upon themselves to be the change that they want to see.

Before setting up the ‘Maa Shri Yamuna Seva Samiti’ group of volunteers in October last year, who are also referred to as Friends of Yamuna, Upadhyay, while on his way to the newspaper centre every morning, used to go alone to pick up the trash on the riverside. He also planted saplings near the banks to make it look greener.

Some of his family members and friends started joining him in the cleanliness drive and as the group grew bigger, they decided to devote at least three hours (between 8-11 a.m.) on the last Sunday of every month to the cause.

yamuna river
“It really saddens me to see the conditions of our rivers. People have mistaken our water bodies as garbage dumping areas,” Chaubey lamented. Flickr

“After the death of my mother, I was broken up from the inside. One day I realised that Yamuna Ji is also our Goddess (‘Ma’) and I must take care of it and it is our duty to clean the river,” Upadhyay told IANS. “I felt that my late parents would be happy to see me serving Ma Yamuna. So I started doing the cleaning job at my level. I felt that the river, which we consider our Goddess needs to be saved,” he said.

“We bring tools such as brooms and gloves from our own houses. We also do not want any monetary help from people or from any government. What we actually need is manpower and pure dedication towards cleaning the river,” he added.

After collecting all the waste from the river banks, they dump the collected garbage in the dumpers provided by the East Delhi Municipal Corporation. “We have plans to expand the drive once more people join us. The work on Chhath ghat is just the start and bigger things are coming. It is in our capable hands to make this change,” said B.N. Singh, a member of the group.

According to Asha Chaubey, another member who has joined the cleanliness drive, it is very important for people to come forward and do their bit for the environment. “It really saddens me to see the conditions of our rivers. People have mistaken our water bodies as garbage dumping areas,” Chaubey lamented.

yamuna river, newspaper hawkers
Though housands of crores have been spent to clean the river, the pollution levels have shown no serious signs of decline. Flickr

“With the groundwater depletion in various parts of the country, keeping our rivers clean is the need of the hour and people should start taking it seriously before it is too late,” Chaubey told IANS. The newspaper hawkers are now planning to plant more trees on the banks of the Yamuna and their only appeal to people is not to throw any garbage into the river.

ALSO READ: Delhi Government Gives Nod To a Project to Create Reservoirs in Yamuna Flood Plain

Although the Yamuna river flows only for 54 km through Delhi, from Palla to Badarpur, the 22-km stretch from Wazirabad to Okhla, which is less than 2 per cent of the river length of 1,370 kilometres from Yamunotri to Prayagraj, accounts for about 76 per cent of the pollution level in the river, according to the findings of a committee.

Though housands of crores have been spent to clean the river, the pollution levels have shown no serious signs of decline. The total expenditure incurred on river conservation under the Yamuna Action Plan (YAP) alone, introduced in 1993, has surpassed Rs 1,500 crore. (IANS)