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A 22-year-old Sikh mistaken for being Muslim gets Abused and Harassed at US store in Massachusetts

A 22 year-old Sikh was harassed in a store after a man thinks that he is a Muslim

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People of Sikh community (Representational Image), Pixabay

Boston, November 21, 2016: Everyone is unique, no matter what community they belong to or the language they speak. But some people fail to share the same view and think otherwise.

Some people generalise characteristics of a community and think that all belonging to the same community will believe or follow the same direction. This leads to hateful marginalisation and harassment. After Donald trump emerged victorious in the 2016 US presidential elections, the number of cases of such hateful harassment have increased and over 200 incidents have been reported, mentioned PTI.

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[bctt tweet=”Harmann Singh was confronted by a man who called him a ‘(expletive) Muslim.’  ” username=””]

A 22-year-old Sikh student at the Harvard Law School has come across such incident of discrimination. He was harassed on November 11 at a store in the vicinity of the campus by someone who assumed that he was Muslim. Harmann Singh, from Buffalo, New York is a first-year law student at Harvard and was speaking to his mother on the phone during the entire incident.

“Over the weekend, I was confronted by a man who called me a ‘(expletive) Muslim’ and followed me around a store aggressively asking where I was from, and no one in the store said a thing. I was on the phone with my mom the entire time, and we were both concerned for my safety as this man stood inches away from me,” Singh wrote in The Boston Globe.

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He also wrote that “While deeply painful, what happened to me pales in comparison to the hate and violence many of my brothers and sisters have faced across the country.” Singh said that the man was following him all around the store and kept asking him where he was from while harassing him. Singh tried to ignore the man and continue his conversation on the phone, mentioned PTI report.

The owner of the store said that he did see the man who spoke to Harmann and intended to ask the man to leave but he was at the back of the store when the incident occurred and both of them had left when he returned.

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The owner also said that he did not know who the man was and was hoping to never see him again.

Harmann said that the most efficient way to encounter such marginalisation is to be there for each other. He said that even a bystander who interrupts to check in with the victim being harassed can make a difference.

-prepared by Shivam Thaker of NewsGram. Twitter: @Shivam_Thaker

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Charge on Facebook for Discriminating People on the Basis of their Identity

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment early Thursday

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The total number of vanished posts could be significantly higher, as the very nature of the issue makes it extremely difficult to make a full accounting of what exactly has gone missing over the years. VOA

Facebook was charged with discrimination by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development because of its ad-targeting system.

HUD said Thursday Facebook is allowing advertisers to exclude people based on their neighborhood by drawing a red line around those neighborhoods on a map and giving advertisers the option of showing ads only to men or only to women.

The agency also claims Facebook allowed advertisers to exclude people that the social media company classified as parents; non-American-born; non-Christian; interested in accessibility; interested in Hispanic culture or a wide variety of other interests that closely align with the Fair Housing Act’s protected classes.

HUD, which is pursuing civil charges and potential monetary awards that could run into the millions, said Facebook’s ad platform is “encouraging, enabling, and causing housing discrimination” because it allows advertisers to exclude people who they don’t want to see their ads.

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The claim from HUD comes less than a week after Facebook said it would overhaul its ad-targeting systems to prevent discrimination in housing. Wikimedia

The claim from HUD comes less than a week after Facebook said it would overhaul its ad-targeting systems to prevent discrimination in housing , credit and employment ads as part of a legal settlement with a group that includes the American Civil Liberties Union, the National Fair Housing Alliance and others.

The technology at the heart of the clashes is what has helped turned Facebook into a goliath with annual revenue of close to $56 billion.

It can offer advertisers and groups the ability to direct messages with precision to exactly the crowd that they want to see it. The potential is as breathtaking as it is potentially destructive.

Facebook has taken fire for allowing groups to target groups of people identified as “Jew-haters” and Nazi sympathizers. There remains the fallout from the 2016 election, when, among other things, Facebook allowed fake Russian accounts to buy ads targeting U.S. users to enflame political divisions.

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The technology at the heart of the clashes is what has helped turned Facebook into a goliath with annual revenue of close to $56 billion. Pixabay

The company is wrestling with several government investigations in the U.S. and Europe over its data and privacy practices. A shakeup this month that ended with the departure of some of Facebook’s highest ranking executives raised questions about the company’s direction.

The departures came shortly after CEO Mark Zuckerberg laid out a new “privacy-focused” vision for social networking. He has promised to transform Facebook from a company known for devouring the personal information shared by its users to one that gives people more ways to communicate in truly private fashion, with their intimate thoughts and pictures shielded by encryption in ways that Facebook itself can’t read.

ALSO READ: Facebook Bans White Nationalism, Separatism

However, HUD Secretary Ben Carson said Thursday there is little difference between the potential for discrimination in Facebook’s technology, and discrimination that has taken place for years.

“Facebook is discriminating against people based upon who they are and where they live,” Carson said. “Using a computer to limit a person’s housing choices can be just as discriminatory as slamming a door in someone’s face.” Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment early Thursday. (VOA)