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A look into the mind of a brainwashed Kashmiri suicide bomber

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Peeping into the teenage Kashmiri suicide bomber's mind reveals the harsh realities the youth of Kashmir is facing. Pixabay
Peeping into the teenage Kashmiri suicide bomber's mind reveals the harsh realities the youth of Kashmir is facing. Pixabay
  • Jaish-e-Mohammad, a teenage suicide bomber who was killed this Sunday threatens attacks across India in a video.
  • The video shows how teenagers are brainwashed while sitting between terrorists and rifles.
  • The video has brought out the various reasons why the Kashmiri youth is turning towards terrorism.

A teenage Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) suicide bomber killed on Sunday in Kashmir had threatened terror attacks across India in an undated video which announces the “roaring” resurgence of his outfit headed by the Pakistan-based militant Masood Azhar.

The video, which gives a peek into how Kashmiri teenagers are being brainwashed into believing that they are targeting enemies of Islam, was apparently recorded in a house in the Kashmir Valley.

The Pakistan-based militant outfit on Monday released the eight-minute video online in which Fardeen Khanday, son of a Jammu and Kashmir policeman, urges Kashmiri youth and Muslims across the country to join the “fight against India”.
Kashmiri youth turns towards terrorism as they face severities. Wikipedia Commons
Kashmiri youth turns towards terrorism as they face severities. Wikipedia Commons

Seated between three AK assault rifles, a huge cache of ammunition, grenades and communication devices, Khanday appears calm even as he says that “by the time the video is released I will already be a new guest in heaven”.

Khanday, 16, was killed after he and two other Jaish suicide bombers attacked a paramilitary camp in Pulwama in south Kashmir on Sunday. Five Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) personnel were killed in the attack. The other two attackers were also killed.

He said it was being made out as if unemployment was driving Kashmiri youths to take to militancy. “But the fact is that it is nothing (but) propaganda.

“The importance of jihad increases when infidels occupy our land and threaten the modesty of our women.

“My friends and I have listened to the call of Quran and plunged into the battlefield of jihad. This will continue till the last occupying soldier is present in Kashmir,” he says in Urdu with a thick Kashmiri accent.

According to police, Khanday, a resident of Tral in south Kashmir, which was the slain Burhan Wani’s hometown, joined militants only three months ago after his family reported him missing on September 15.

In the video, he also talks about the demolition of Babri Masjid as well as attacks on security forces blamed on the Jaish.

“Even after repeated claims by Indian security forces and agencies, Jaish-e-Mohammad has not been wiped out from the Valley. Jaish is not so weak. It is impossible to stop Jaish-e-Mohammad… We are roaring,” Khanday says in the recorded video. IANS

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Researchers Develop System That Can Locate Shooters Using Smartphone Video

Specifically, the system looks at the time delay between the crack caused by a supersonic bullet's shock wave and the muzzle blast, which travels at the speed of sound

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By using Video from three or more smartphones, the direction from which the shots were fired -- and the shooter's location -- can be calculated based on the differences in how long it takes the muzzle blast to reach each camera. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a system that can accurately locate a shooter based on Video recordings from as few as three smartphones.

The system, called Video Event Reconstruction and Analysis (VERA), won’t necessarily replace the commercial microphone arrays for locating shooters that public safety officials already use, although it may be a useful supplement for public safety when commercial arrays aren’t available.

“One key motivation for assembling VERA was to create a tool that could be used by human rights workers and journalists who investigate war crimes, terrorist acts and human rights violations,” study researcher Alexander Hauptmann from Carnegie Mellon University in the US.

When demonstrated using three video recordings from the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas that left 58 people dead and hundreds wounded, the system correctly estimated the shooter’s actual location — the north wing of the Mandalay Bay hotel.

The estimate was based on three gunshots fired within the first minute of what would be a prolonged massacre.

VERA uses machine learning techniques to synchronise the video feeds and calculate the position of each camera based on what that camera is seeing.

“But it’s the audio from the video feeds that’s pivotal in localising the source of the gunshots,” Hauptmann said.

Specifically, the system looks at the time delay between the crack caused by a supersonic bullet’s shock wave and the muzzle blast, which travels at the speed of sound.

It also uses audio to identify the type of gun used, which determines bullet speed.

VERA can then calculate the shooter’s distance from the smartphone.

“When we began, we didn’t think you could detect the crack with a smartphone because it’s really short,” Hauptmann said.

“But it turns out today’s cell phone microphones are pretty good,” Hauptmann added.

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Researchers have developed a system that can accurately locate a shooter based on Video recordings from as few as three smartphones. Pixabay

By using video from three or more smartphones, the direction from which the shots were fired — and the shooter’s location — can be calculated based on the differences in how long it takes the muzzle blast to reach each camera.

VERA is not limited to detecting gunshots.

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“It is an event analysis system that can be used to locate a variety of other sounds relevant to human rights and war crimes investigations,” Hauptmann said.

The researchers presented VERA and released it as open-source code at the Association for Computing Machinery’s International Conference on Multimedia in Nice, France. (IANS)