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A mum service towards the Vedas and the country

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Sri Sivaraja Deekshithar - Teaching Veda to his fellow sishyas . Image source: rathnacharitabletrust.com
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Chennai, TN: R R Rangarajan aspired to study Vedas as a child but this dream of his couldn’t be realized by him. His dream is now lived by his two sons who are studying in the Kanchi Mahan Vidya Mandir in Rajakizhpakkam.

He believes that he has not forced or imposed his dreams on his sons and his sons are happy in the gurukulam once he aspired to learn in.

According to the couple, this was the wisest decision they took five years ago and they are proud of it. The couple will be complimented for this in a function in the city on Sunday along with the other 300 couples from 70 different places.

Sarma Sastrigal believes that these parents are doing a commendable job at a time when rest of the crowd is chasing towards money and a secure job for their children. He further adds that this is a mum service they are doing towards the Vedas and the country.

Moreover, last year when he was invited as the chief guest at their anniversary function to the Kumbakonam Raja Veda Kavya Patasala, he was driven by the sacrifice of the parents and their children and believed that to be ignored and hence felt the need for it to be exhibited.

Students of the Raja Veda Kavya Patasala at Kumbakonam in Thanjavur district. Image source: thehindu.com
Students of the Raja Veda Kavya Patasala at Kumbakonam in Thanjavur district. Image source: thehindu.com

Nagarajan further observes that this is difficult for the children as well. The module educates them with each and every little thing from maths to physical science, from commerce to the Vedas, scriptures, dramas and many other things. He adds that in the end the final say is of the individual to chase it.

Arvind Bhatt, priest of Dattatreya temple in Gulbarga has his son studying Ghanam at Ramanasaranam, Tiruvannamalai. His son, Nirguna, showed interest in the subject since his childhood. In the beginning he was admitted in a Patsala in North Canara but was not happy with the module there on its completion, so he shifted from there. Here the relationship which he shares with his guru is indescribable. He further plans to graduate in advance level in the subject.

Mr Balasubramaniam of Kumbakonam Kavya Patasala is hopeful that more parents will choose this field for the education of their children. Moreover, he feels that parents have to be encouraged to motivate their children in the right path. However, he feels sad that studying Vedas is never a priority for parents.

He further believes that the energy and memory levels of students while young are unmatchable and they master course with less difficulty. So, the children have to be enrolled in the course when young.

The town echoed with Veda mantras during Mahamagham recited by hundreds of scholars and students from various states and the country. The spirit of the land relies on it and people are trying their best to keep this alive. (Inputs from The Hindu)

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The Biggest Casualty In Yemen’s War- Education

Yemen also suffers from a shortage of learning facilities.

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Girls attend a class at their school damaged by a recent Saudi-led air strike, in the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen.VOA

The school year in Yemen is officially underway. But, the U.N. children’s fund reports the country’s ongoing civil war is keeping millions of children out of the classroom.

More than three years of fighting between the Yemeni government and Houthi rebels is having a devastating impact on children’s health and well-being. The U.N. reports more than 11 million children or 80 percent of the country’s children are dependent upon humanitarian aid.

Another major casualty of the war is children’s education. The U.N. children’s fund says the education sector is on the brink of collapse because of conflict, political divisions and chronic underdevelopment.

yemen

UNICEF: Education a Major Casualty of Yemen’s War.

As a consequence, UNICEF spokesman Christophe Boulierac said around two million children are not going to school this year. Furthermore, he said nearly four million primary school children soon may not be able to get an education because of a severe shortage of teachers.

“About 67 percent of public school teachers — and this is across the country — have not been paid for nearly two years. Many have looked for other work to survive or are only teaching a few subjects. So, obviously, the quality of education is at stake. Children are not getting their full lessons due to the absence of their teachers. Even when schools are functioning, the schools’ days and years are shortened.”

Yemen also suffers from a shortage of learning facilities. UNICEF reports more than 2,500 schools have been damaged or destroyed by the war. Many schools also are being used as shelters for displaced people and some have been taken over by armed groups.

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FILE – A supporter carries posters depicting Houthi leader Abdel-Malek al-Houthi during a rally in Sana’a, Yemen, March 6, 2015.
Image source: VOA

The agency warns children who are out of school run many dangers. It notes boys are at risk of being used as child soldiers. It estimates more than 2,600 children have been recruited by all armed groups.

Also Read: North Kivu And Ituri, Congo To Welcome More Than 80,000 Children In This New School Year

UNICEF says girls are likely to be married off at an early age. A 2016 survey finds close to three quarters of women in Yemen have been married before the age of 18, and 44.5 percent before the age of 15. (VOA)