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About 98 Percent of Beggars in the city are Fake, says Municipal Body of Hyderabad

On an average, a beggar earns Rs 1,000-2,000 per day, operating with an annual income of more than Rs 24 lakhs

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Begging in India. Image source: theindiansociety.org
  • Greater Hyderabad Municipal Corporation has launched a drive to turn Hyderabad into a “Beggar Free” city 
  • Most beggars in the city are part of an organised racket
  • The civic body is also asking the citizens of Hyderabad not to give alms to the beggars

When Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu’s package of Rs. 10,000 was rejected by the beggars last year, in 2015, one could not help but wonder how much these beggars earn. The Chief Minister wanted to keep Pushkaram Ghats in Rajahmundry free of beggars and offered them Rs. 10,000 and had decided to provide them food so that they would not crowd at the ghats but the offer was declined by nearly 300 beggars.

Now, the Greater Hyderabad Municipal Corporation has launched a drive to turn Hyderabad into a “Beggar Free” city by providing a permanent solution to the beggars. But 98 percent of the 14,000-strong population of beggars in the city, with the annual income of more than Rs 24 crore are categorised as “fake beggars” by the civic body. Most beggars in the city are part of an organised racket, the Corporation maintains and indulge in illegal activities under the guise of begging.

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“We are ready to help the genuine beggars. But people who have chosen begging as a profession and are doing illegal activities will be punished by law. We are starting a toll-free number for people to complain if they face any nuisance from beggars. If you find any beggar, bring them to us and we will take care of them,” said Hyderabad Mayor Bonthu Ram Mohan to Scroll.in.

Scroll. in quoted a survey that states- on an average, a beggar earns Rs 1,000-2,000 per day, operating with an annual income of more than Rs 24 lakhs. “People of other states are joining these beggars to commit crimes. These beggars are into drugs, prostitution and money lending. They are spoiling the city,” claimed B Shankar Narayanan, General Secretary of Federation of NGOs of Beggar Free Society.

In an attempt to help the genuine beggars, the municipal corporation appeals them to register themselves for rehabilitation and promises food and shelter. They are also promising training for those who want to work, school enrollment for children and a place to stay for the elderly in old age homes.

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The civic body is also asking the citizens of Hyderabad not to give alms to the beggars. “Beggars are not leaving their profession because people give money in temples and mosques due to their sentiments. In our roadshows, we say: ‘Not only punish the beggars who are begging also punish the people who are giving. said Narayana to Scroll.in.

Image Source: climateage.wordpress.com

Several discussions are being held to provide alms and work to the beggars. One such plan is to ask all the visitors to temples not to give money to the beggars but rather drop it in the ‘hundi’. The beggars registered with the temple will receive money from the ‘hundi’ accordingly. “We are going to catch all the beggars – they have to give their addresses. If they have a family, we will send them back and we will send genuine beggars to rehabilitation centres,” said Narayanan.

The 2,500 Sulabh toilets are coming up in the city that could provide employment to these beggars and could also help build the city. There are only a few toilets in the city and they too lack the manpower to maintain them. Employment to 2,500 people with an income of Rs 200 per day can be generated by this initiative, reported Scroll.

-This report is modified by Ajay Krishna, a staff-writer at NewsGram.

ALSO READ:

 

  • Karishma Vanjani

    There are people in dire need of someone who’ll extend the hand and then there are some shouting ‘ ayye salman khan’. The ones in dire need wont refuse a package of Rs. 10,000

  • Aparna Gupta

    Due to their business, people will not help those who are really in need. If MCD knows this, they should do something to curb this.

  • AJ Krish

    These organised units should realize what is good for them keeping the future in mind. Instead of exploiting the good nature of the people, they should try to find some work and accept what the government is offering them.

SHARE
  • Karishma Vanjani

    There are people in dire need of someone who’ll extend the hand and then there are some shouting ‘ ayye salman khan’. The ones in dire need wont refuse a package of Rs. 10,000

  • Aparna Gupta

    Due to their business, people will not help those who are really in need. If MCD knows this, they should do something to curb this.

  • AJ Krish

    These organised units should realize what is good for them keeping the future in mind. Instead of exploiting the good nature of the people, they should try to find some work and accept what the government is offering them.

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Governments Around The World are Learning to Confuse Dissidents on Social Media

The researchers, who published their findings in a recent issue of Political Science Research and Methods, specifically examined social media from both the Venezuela regime and its opposition

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Social Media
The regime also seemed to develop a more sophisticated approach to using hashtags on Social Media. The regime used long hashtags, as opposed to the shorter hashtags that are more commonly used, to promote distraction among the protest groups. Pixabay

Governments the world over are learning new tactics to quash dissent on various Social Media platforms, responding with tweets designed to distract and confuse like longer hashtags, according to a team of political scientists.

In a study of Twitter interactions during Venezuela’s 2014 protests, in which citizens voiced opposition to government leaders and called for improvements to their standard of living, the tweets of the protesters focused mainly on the protest itself, while the tweets issued by the ruling regime covered more diverse topics.

This could mean that regimes are growing more savvy in their use of social media to help suppress mass movements.

“When we started doing this study there had been a lot of optimism about the capacity of social media to produce revolutions throughout the world, like Arab Spring and the Color Revolutions in Europe,” said Kevin Munger, assistant professor of political science and social data analytics, Penn State.

“But it seems like, in hindsight, this was the result of short-term disequilibrium between the capacity of the masses to use this technology and the limited capacity of these elites to use it.”

A lot of these elites may have not been keeping up with modern communication technology and got caught unawares.

So, for that short period of time, social media did produce better outcomes for revolutions and mass movements.

The researchers, who published their findings in a recent issue of Political Science Research and Methods, specifically examined social media from both the Venezuela regime and its opposition.

Social Media
Governments the world over are learning new tactics to quash dissent on various Social Media platforms, responding with tweets designed to distract and confuse like longer hashtags, according to a team of political scientists. Pixabay

Following the death of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez in early 2013, Nicolas Maduro, Chavez’s vice-president, won a special election.

After his election, mass protests erupted related to economic decline and increased crime.

In their analysis, the researchers noted that the regime abruptly shifted its Twitter strategy after protests swept across the country.

The topics of the regime’s tweets became even more diverse than usual — including such topics as a tree-planting event — and often did not address the protests at all.

As the protests continued, however, the researchers said that the opposition also became less focused, which the researchers suggest may have been a reaction to the regime’s social media strategy.

The way that attention works on social networks offers a glimpse into why the strategy to distract citizens might be effective, added Munger, who worked on the study while a doctoral student in politics at New York University.

Social Media
Regimes are growing more savvy in their use of Social Media to help suppress mass movements. Pixabay

“To have effective protests, you need to have a ton of people coordinated on a single message, so spreading other narratives disrupts that process of coordination,” said Munger.

“Being able to spread doubt is effective. You don’t have to get people to love your regime, you just need people to less convinced of the single narrative.”

ALSO READ: President of Egypt Calls for Collective Action Against Countries Supporting Terrorism

The regime also seemed to develop a more sophisticated approach to using hashtags. The regime used long hashtags, as opposed to the shorter hashtags that are more commonly used, to promote distraction among the protest groups. (IANS)