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About 98 Percent of Beggars in the city are Fake, says Municipal Body of Hyderabad

On an average, a beggar earns Rs 1,000-2,000 per day, operating with an annual income of more than Rs 24 lakhs

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Begging in India. Image source: theindiansociety.org
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  • Greater Hyderabad Municipal Corporation has launched a drive to turn Hyderabad into a “Beggar Free” city 
  • Most beggars in the city are part of an organised racket
  • The civic body is also asking the citizens of Hyderabad not to give alms to the beggars

When Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu’s package of Rs. 10,000 was rejected by the beggars last year, in 2015, one could not help but wonder how much these beggars earn. The Chief Minister wanted to keep Pushkaram Ghats in Rajahmundry free of beggars and offered them Rs. 10,000 and had decided to provide them food so that they would not crowd at the ghats but the offer was declined by nearly 300 beggars.

Now, the Greater Hyderabad Municipal Corporation has launched a drive to turn Hyderabad into a “Beggar Free” city by providing a permanent solution to the beggars. But 98 percent of the 14,000-strong population of beggars in the city, with the annual income of more than Rs 24 crore are categorised as “fake beggars” by the civic body. Most beggars in the city are part of an organised racket, the Corporation maintains and indulge in illegal activities under the guise of begging.

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“We are ready to help the genuine beggars. But people who have chosen begging as a profession and are doing illegal activities will be punished by law. We are starting a toll-free number for people to complain if they face any nuisance from beggars. If you find any beggar, bring them to us and we will take care of them,” said Hyderabad Mayor Bonthu Ram Mohan to Scroll.in.

Scroll. in quoted a survey that states- on an average, a beggar earns Rs 1,000-2,000 per day, operating with an annual income of more than Rs 24 lakhs. “People of other states are joining these beggars to commit crimes. These beggars are into drugs, prostitution and money lending. They are spoiling the city,” claimed B Shankar Narayanan, General Secretary of Federation of NGOs of Beggar Free Society.

In an attempt to help the genuine beggars, the municipal corporation appeals them to register themselves for rehabilitation and promises food and shelter. They are also promising training for those who want to work, school enrollment for children and a place to stay for the elderly in old age homes.

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The civic body is also asking the citizens of Hyderabad not to give alms to the beggars. “Beggars are not leaving their profession because people give money in temples and mosques due to their sentiments. In our roadshows, we say: ‘Not only punish the beggars who are begging also punish the people who are giving. said Narayana to Scroll.in.

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Several discussions are being held to provide alms and work to the beggars. One such plan is to ask all the visitors to temples not to give money to the beggars but rather drop it in the ‘hundi’. The beggars registered with the temple will receive money from the ‘hundi’ accordingly. “We are going to catch all the beggars – they have to give their addresses. If they have a family, we will send them back and we will send genuine beggars to rehabilitation centres,” said Narayanan.

The 2,500 Sulabh toilets are coming up in the city that could provide employment to these beggars and could also help build the city. There are only a few toilets in the city and they too lack the manpower to maintain them. Employment to 2,500 people with an income of Rs 200 per day can be generated by this initiative, reported Scroll.

-This report is modified by Ajay Krishna, a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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  • Karishma Vanjani

    There are people in dire need of someone who’ll extend the hand and then there are some shouting ‘ ayye salman khan’. The ones in dire need wont refuse a package of Rs. 10,000

  • Aparna Gupta

    Due to their business, people will not help those who are really in need. If MCD knows this, they should do something to curb this.

  • AJ Krish

    These organised units should realize what is good for them keeping the future in mind. Instead of exploiting the good nature of the people, they should try to find some work and accept what the government is offering them.

SHARE
  • Karishma Vanjani

    There are people in dire need of someone who’ll extend the hand and then there are some shouting ‘ ayye salman khan’. The ones in dire need wont refuse a package of Rs. 10,000

  • Aparna Gupta

    Due to their business, people will not help those who are really in need. If MCD knows this, they should do something to curb this.

  • AJ Krish

    These organised units should realize what is good for them keeping the future in mind. Instead of exploiting the good nature of the people, they should try to find some work and accept what the government is offering them.

Next Story

Adultery Law Gets Scrapped: Another Progressive Step In India

Misra is stepping down as chief justice next week when he turns 65, the mandatory retirement age for Supreme Court judges. 

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A gardener works on the lawns of the Supreme Court in New Delhi, India, Aug. 22, 2017. India's Chief Justice of the Supreme Court has presided over a string of verdicts in recent weeks that grant more rights to women, gay couples and religious minorities as he prepares to retire from the bench next month. VOA

The chief justice of  Supreme Court of India has presided over a string of recent rulings that grant more rights to women, gay couples and religious minorities, challenging deeply conservative Indian society before he retires next month.

In the latest decision Thursday, Chief Justice Dipak Misra and the rest of the five-member court struck down a 158-year-old law that treated adultery in certain cases as a criminal offense punishable by up to five years in prison.

The court called the law, which did not allow wives to prosecute adulterous husbands, unconstitutional and noted that a “husband is not the master of woman.” Adultery can still be grounds for divorce in India, the verdict said, but a criminal penalty violated women’s protection to equal rights under the law.

Accolades for ruling

The verdict was hailed by activists and left-of-center members of India’s Parliament.

“Excellent decision,” tweeted Sushmita Dev, a lawmaker and president of the opposition Congress party’s women’s wing. She said “a law that does not give women the right to sue her adulterer husband … is unequal treatment and militates against her status as an individual.”

India
Participants displays a rainbow flag and cheer as gay rights activists and their supporters march during a gay pride parade in New Delhi, India. VOA

Amnesty International India said the decision was “a progressive judgment” and the old law was a “remnant of a time when a woman was considered to be the property of her husband.”

The scrapped law allowed men to file charges against other men who had affairs with their wives. Women having affairs could not be prosecuted, but they also couldn’t file a complaint against cheating husbands.

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Gay couples, religious minorities

Earlier this month, the Misra-led court also struck down a colonial-era law that made gay sex punishable by up to 10 years in prison. The 1861 law, a relic of Victorian England that hung on long after the end of British colonialism, was “a breach of the rights of privacy and dignity,” the court ruled. It added that “history owes an apology to the members of this community and their families, for the delay in providing redressal for the ignominy and ostracism that they have suffered through the centuries.”

On Thursday, the court also decided not to reconsider a 1994 decision that would have delayed proceedings in a case over the ownership of the site of a mosque that Hindu hard-liners demolished in 1992.

India
Indian Muslim women talk while walking through a market in Ahmadabad, India. VOA

Fast pace for India

The court’s recent pace of decisions speaks to another feature of Misra’s tenure: expediting cases in a country where they routinely take decades to resolve.

There are 33 million court cases pending in India, government figures show.

Misra is stepping down as chief justice next week when he turns 65, the mandatory retirement age for Supreme Court judges.

Also Read: What Would Be The Outcome of The Judgement on Homosexuality with BJP at The Centre?

He joined India’s highest court in 2011. His 13-month tenure as chief justice has won him accolades from advocates of disadvantaged groups but drawn unprecedented criticism from other members of the bench.

In January, the four most senior justices held a news conference against Misra, who as chief justice controls the court’s roster and decides who will take which cases, listing a litany of problems that they said afflicted the court and risked undermining India’s democracy. Misra met with the dissenting judges, who continued on the bench. (VOA)