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Amid Controversy, India to revisit Indus water treaty with Pakistan signed in 1960

India might consider revisit the Indus Water Treaty feeling that there are differences in implementation of the treaty in both countries.

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Indo Pak border at Neelum Valley. All tributaries of Indus will affected by Indus Water Treaty. Wikimedia
  • The Indus water treaty brokered by World bank in 1960 by India and Pakistan
  • Jammu-Kashmir has been demanding the revisitation of treaty as it robs the state of its right to use the water of its rivers
  • India is already locked in a diplomatic blitz with Pakistan regarding the killing of 18 Indian soldiers in Uri

New Delhi, September 22, 2016:  India while already being engaged in a diplomatic war against Pakistan regarding the Sunday’s terror attack on an army base in Kashmir might consider revisiting the Indus Water Treaty that was signed in 1960.

“I am sure you are aware that there are differences between India and Pakistan on the implementation of the Indus Waters Treaty,” External Affairs Ministry spokesperson Vikas Swarup said in reply to a question at a media briefing here on Thursday.“But this is an issue which is being addressed bilaterally. But let me make a basic point. Eventually, any cooperative arrangement requires goodwill and mutual trust on both sides,” Swarup said.

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“For any such treaty to work, it is important there must be mutual trust and cooperation. It can’t be a one-sided affair.”

The water distribution treaty brokered by the World Bank was signed between the two countries in 1960 after Pakistan’s fear that since the source rivers of the Indus basin are in India, it could potentially create droughts and famines in Pakistan during times of war.

According to the agreement, India has control over three eastern rivers — Beas, Ravi and Sutlej — all flowing from Punjab.

Pakistan, as per the treaty, controls the western rivers of the Indus, Chenab and Jhelum that flow from Jammu and Kashmir.

Jammu and Kashmir have been demanding a review of the treaty as it robs the state of its rights to use the water of the rivers.

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India and Pakistan are currently locked in a diplomatic war after the killing of 18 Indian soldiers in Uri, close to the Line of Control (LoC) with Pakistan. (IANS)

 

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India will become High-Middle Income Country by 2047, says World Bank CEO

World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva on Saturday said she has no doubt that India will be a high-middle income country by 2047.

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World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva. IANS.

New Delhi, Nov 4: Lauding India’s increasing per capita income, World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva on Saturday said she has no doubt that India will be a high-middle income country by 2047 when it completes its centenary year of independence.

“In the last three decades, India’s per capita income has quadrupled. I have no doubt India when it hits its century of independence in 2047, will be a high-middle income country,” Georgieva said while addressing India’s Business Reforms conference at Pravasi Bharatiya Kendra here.

Georgieva praised India for its sudden jump of 30 ranks in 2017, the biggest leap ever, in the history of the ease of doing business.

World Bank CEO
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Wikimedia.

“We are here to celebrate a very impressive achievement. In 15 years of the history of the ease of doing business, such a jump of 30-ranks in one year is very rare. In cricket, I understand that hitting a century is a big milestone.”

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She hailed Prime Minister Narendra Modi for his “high-level ownership” efforts and “championship of reforms” that led to achieve India such a ranking in ease of doing business.

Reminding Guru Nanak Dev’s preachings, the World Bank CEO said: “Today is also the anniversary of Guru Nanak which reminds me of his words that whatever seed is sown, the plant will grow thus.” (IANS)

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‘Black Day’ Protests : Restrictions Imposed in Srinagar to keep security in check

Separatists leaders have asked people to observe October 27 as a “black day” in Kashmir.

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police and Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) in full riot gear were seen disallowing pedestrian and vehicular movement in parts of Kashmir. (Representative image) VOA

Srinagar, October 27, 2017 : Authorities imposed restrictions in various areas on Friday to prevent separatist-called protests to mark the Accession Day of Jammu and Kashmir to India.

Joint resistance leadership (JRL) of separatist leaders — Syed Ali Shah Geelani, Mirwaiz Umer Farooq and Yasin Malik — have asked people to observe October 27 as a “black day” in Kashmir.

It was on this day in 1947 that the Indian Army landed in Srinagar Airport following the accession of the state.

“Restrictions under section 144 of CrPC will remain in force in Nowhatta, M.R.Gunj, Safa Kadal, Rainawari, Khanyar, Kralkhud and Maisuma,” a police officer said.

Heavy contingents of the state police and Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) in full riot gear were seen disallowing pedestrian and vehicular movement in these areas.

Railway services in the valley have also been suspended on Friday as a precautionary measure. (IANS)

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PM Modi Appoints New Envoy to Kashmir

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Kashmiri protesters run for cover as police use tear smoke to disperse protesters during a clash in Srinagar,Jammu and Kashmir. VOA

New Delhi, October 24: The center has appointed a new envoy to Kashmir in the hope of promoting peace in the troubled region.

Home Minister Rajnath Singh says former Intelligence Bureau director Dineshwar Sharma has been designated to open talks with Kashmir’s various factions – the first such appointment by Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

“As a representative of the government of India, … Sharma will initiate a sustained interaction and dialogue to understand legitimate aspirations of the people of Kashmir,” Singh said in New Delhi.

Kashmir has been the center of a deadly tug-of-war between India and neighboring Pakistan since the end of British colonial rule in 1947. The Muslim-majority Himalayan territory is divided between the nuclear-armed rivals, but both claim Kashmir in full.

Kashmir rebels have battled Indian forces for decades, demanding either independence or a merger with Pakistan. The rebels have staged a series of attacks on Indian security bases in recent months, including an attack in southern Kashmir in August that left eight security officials dead.(VOA)