An Overview Of Bipolar Disorder

The depressive symptoms of Bipolar I, on the other hand, are more extreme than the hypomanic episodes of Bipolar II

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Bipolar disorder can cause a person to think faster, feel smarter, or be more imaginative than normal. Pixabay

BY- JAYA CHOUDHARY

Bipolar disorder, also known as bipolar depressive disorder, is a neurological disorder that causes mood and behavior changes. Bipolar disorder is characterized by episodes of abnormally high expansive or irritable moods interspersed with periods of depression. During a manic episode, a person can feel ‘high’ for an extended amount of time and be too cheerful or outgoing. A reduction in the need for sleep and an increase in goal-directed thinking are two symptoms of mania or hypomania.

Other behavioral variations are evident during a psychotic or hypomanic phase. An individual can, for example, speak quickly or be more talkative. They are prone to being easily confused. They can also partake in high-risk habits and behave erratically and irresponsibly, such as unrestrained shopping sprees, sexual indiscretions, or risky business investments. People with bipolar disorder can have irrational confidence in their own abilities at times. Inflated self-esteem, grandiosity, and speeding impulses are all symptoms of psychotic or hypomanic episodes.

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Bipolar disorder can cause a person to think faster, feel smarter, or be more imaginative than normal. During manic spells, inappropriate behavior may have a detrimental effect on marriages, employment, and finances. A psychotic episode, on the other hand, will quickly transform into a depressive episode. During a depressive illness, a person can experience periods of sadness or hopelessness, as well as a lack of interest in previously enjoyed hobbies. Patients with bipolar disorder are most likely to commit suicide. They can exhibit behavioral changes such as sleeping, feeding, or other behaviors.

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Inflated self-esteem, grandiosity, and speeding impulses are all symptoms of psychotic or hypomanic episodes. Pixabay

Memory and attention problems are common in people who are depressed. Bipolar disorder is divided into two types: bipolar I and bipolar II. At least one major depressive episode characterizes both. The depressive symptoms of Bipolar I, on the other hand, are more extreme than the hypomanic episodes of Bipolar II. An individual will cycle between periods of mania and depression in Bipolar I, which can be months or years apart.

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An individual with bipolar II can have episodes of elevated mood but not necessarily a complete manic episode, known as hypomania or a moderate manic episode. As compared to Bipolar I, a person with Bipolar II spends more time in the depression process. Despite the fact that they can be difficult to deal with, drugs like lithium can help control dangerous emotions and behaviors by stabilizing moods. These mood-stabilizing drugs operate by developing excessive brain activity and improving the brain’s viable neural connections.

Many bipolar patients refuse medication out of fear that it will dull their feelings and destroy their imagination. Current psychology, on the other hand, is consciously attempting to prevent this. It’s important to remember that bipolar disorder is a psychiatric condition, not someone’s complete identity. It’s something that people with the condition can control by supporting themselves with the help of friends and relatives, as well as medical treatments.