Friday February 23, 2018
Home Uncategorized Anti-Hindu po...

Anti-Hindu posters at Texas “Dairy Queen” removed

0
//
581
Image source: flipboard.com
Republish
Reprint

Anti-Hindu signs at Kemah (Texas) restaurant of “Dairy Queen” (DQ), which upset Hindus worldwide found highly inappropriate, have been reportedly removed.

Dean A. Peters, Associate Vice President of Communications of American Dairy Queen Corporation headquartered in Minneapolis, in an email response to distinguished Hindu statesman Rajan Zed, wrote on March 31 evening: “We are pleased to announce that as of Wednesday, March 30th, the DQ location in Kemah, Texas is now under new ownership and all interior and exterior signs posted by the former franchisee were immediately removed from that location.”

Zed, who is President of Universal Society of Hinduism, in a statement in Nevada today, thanked International Dairy Queen (IDQ) Inc. for understanding the feelings of the community and resolving the issue.

But, Rajan Zed pointed out, that DQ appeared to have been shirking from its responsibility by not formally apologizing for allowing these derogatory signs reportedly posted at its Kemah store for many months. DQ seemed to have even failed to follow its own “Mission Statement: To create positive memories for all who touch DQ” by permitting such disparaging signs.

Zed urged IDQ Inc. CEO John P. Gainor Junior to come up with an official apology and institute a mechanism in its franchise operations ensuring that such belittling of religions did not happen in the future. Posters reportedly displayed at its Kemah store were highly inappropriate and trivialized the oldest and third largest religion of the world with about one billion adherents and a highly philosophical thought.

International Dairy Queen Inc.; based in Minneapolis; is a subsidiary of Omaha headquartered Berkshire Hathaway Inc.; serving treats and food in over 6,600 locations in USA, Canada and 28 other countries since 1940. Warren E. Buffett is the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway Inc.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Texas Gunman Practiced Target on Animals Ahead of the Shooting Massacre: Ex Colleague

Jessika Edwards, who worked with Kelley at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico from 2010 to 2012, said Kelley told her that he was "using the dogs as target practice".

0
//
46
Texas gunman
Markers are seen at the front f the building as law enforcement officials continue to investigate the scene of a shooting at the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, in Sutherland Springs, Texas. A man opened fire inside the church in the small South Texas community on Sunday, killing and wounding many. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) (VOA)

Washington, November 10, 2017 : Devin Kelley, the gunman who killed 26 persons inside a church in Texas, had claimed that he bought animals for target practice, according to a former Air Force colleague.

Jessika Edwards, who worked with Kelley at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico from 2010 to 2012, said Kelley told her that he was “using the dogs as target practice”.

ALSO READ Texas Mass Shooting: ‘It isn’t a guns situation, but a mental problem’, Says Trump

The morbid admission came in Facebook messages starting in 2014, Edwards told CNN.

Though Edwards was not sure if the Texas gunman was telling the truth, the odd behavior was enough for her to stop communicating with him.

Kelley was accused in 2014 of punching a dog in Colorado. He initially pleaded guilty to animal cruelty, but the case was dismissed after he paid fines.

Edwards said the Texas gunman also displayed a fascination with mass murders while he was enlisted in the Air Force.

“He would make jokes about
wanting to kill somebody…
And we would say,
‘wait, that’s not funny’.”

The obsession was so pronounced, Edwards said, that when Kelley was disciplined for poor performance she told her bosses to “back off or he would shoot the place up”.

“He was always getting into trouble… It was problem after problem,” Edwards said.

A law enforcement source confirmed to CNN that FBI agents interviewed Edwards about her interactions with the gunman.

In 2012, Kelley was court-martialed and convicted for assaulting his wife and stepson.

Edwards said those domestic problems boiled over in the job and Kelley would come in depressed and unfocused.

After the shooting massacre on November 5, the Air Force has been criticised for failing to notify federal law enforcement officials of Kelley’s conviction.

Kelley was dressed in black and wearing a bullet-proof vest when he attacked the church in Sutherland Springs, a quiet town some 45 km southeast of San Antonio.

The victims ranged from under two-years-old to 77. (IANS)

 

Next Story