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Aparna’s conversion to Shahana: Is it Forced Islamic Conversion of Hindus in Kerala?

Aparna was traced at Sathya Sarini, an institute that aims to spread the word of Islam among non-Muslim communities

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Muslim women India. Image source: counterjihadreport.com
  • An estimated 5,793 non-Muslims have been forcibly converted to Islam between 2011 and 2015
  • A recent shock of 21 people had gone missing comes another case of a girl converted from Aparna to Shahana
  • A similar case of Kerala’s Nimisha turning Fathima got the public’s fury recently

Aparna, a student of aeronautical engineering in Kochi, suddenly went missing one day. In this precarious situation, her mother was left with no option and filed a missing report with the Kerala Police. After the investigation, she was located in Calicut.

Aparna was traced at Sathya Sarini, an institute that aims to spread the word of Islam among non-Muslim communities. She had now been converted as a Muslim, going from Aparna to Shahana. A revelation that shook the whole country!

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Women come as a soft target for forced Muslim conversions. Source: express.co.uk
Women come as a soft target for forced Muslim conversions.
Source: express.co.uk

An intelligence report prepared by Kerala’s state police has recognised two conversion centres in Kozhikode (or Calicut) and Malappuram which has converted people to Islam over these years. An estimated 5,793 non-Muslims have been forcibly converted to Islam between 2011 and 2015. It is also feared that the number of converted Muslims at ‘unrecognised’ centres is much higher.

Aparna was a hostel resident from August 2013 at Jual Education Trust, Ernakulam.

Demonstration against forced Islamic conversion and Love Jihad. Source: www.pri.org
Demonstration against forced Islamic conversion and Love Jihad.
Source: www.pri.org

The TOI report also states, more than half of the converted people are women. An approximate of 76% of the total are women below 35 years of age, with Nimisha alias Fathima and Aparna as some of the easy targets. Aparna now refuses to go home with her parents, and when presented before the High Court, she insisted on going with Sumayya, who also took Aparna to the court. This is the face of extreme Islamic radicalism that the nation and worldwide countries are encountering with.

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The religious conversion centres ‘authorised’ in the state are Tharbiyathul Islam Sabha, Kozhikode, and Monunsthil Islam Sabha, Ponnani, where most conversions take place. Allegedly 4,719 of those converted were Hindus and the rest 1,074 were Christian, mentioned a TOI report.

Another detailed report is to be carried out to ascertain whether the cases of Nimisha and Aparna are forced conversions and if they have joined ISIS. “Inquiries are required to know whether this will affect the communal harmony, internal security of the state and nation. A detailed SSB (State Special Branch) inquiry in Kasaragod, Kannur, Alappuzha, Thiruvananthapuram, and Palakkad is recommended to unearth the details,” said the report that was sent by the SP of Kasaragod, A. Srinivas, who had also investigated the case of Nimisha’s conversion in November 2015.

– prepared by Chetna Karnani, at NewsGram. Twitter: @karnani_chetna

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  • regardless_of

    It’s very unfortunate nowadays that journalism inspired by hate spreading of rss had stooped so low! instead of an introspection on hostile Hindu practices against women, this article is trying to portray that an adult girl has been”forced”to escape a life of oppression and subjugation.grow up “Hindu isis” !!

    • Berserker

      yes you mullehs have such friendly practices for women…covering 2 year olds in burqas….and hindu isis …..you are so funny..

  • Manthra koliyer

    Religion should not be forced on anybody.

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    If it indeed it was forced conversion it is a truly sad news with complicated implications for country.

  • sas_sarma

    The time has come to ban conversions, declare India as Hindu state. Those who talk of freedom of religion should do it in Saudi Arabia, Iran and other countries. The conversion through sword is as dangerous as conversion through smile and service.

  • Zimbobaba

    When Turkey govt.,banned Khaffiye ( muslim caps ) in Turkey there was a huge opposition in muslim world including India. Even Gandhi asked hindus to stand by the freedom of Muslim “brothers”. Muslims took out violent rallies thru out India. While doing so, they hurt Hindus out of anger and forcibly converted nearly 30,000 hindus in Mallaparam district in India. Gandhi was compelled to roll back the agitation.

    In Kerala, Catholics are busy converting hindus. They joined muslims, keeping a watchful eye on them too as they hate the muslims too. Both, Muslims and catholics also use communists to hurt and kill hindus deliberately brutally . But muslims intimidate hindus and christians alike under the full protection of Sonia Gandhi and AP combo.

    The fattu Mawalli baxxxrds like Rajdeep, Barkha, Karan , etc….are silent. They themselves are so much afraid and become gilipil to talk about muslims. They are shamelessly busy abusing Modi, bcs. it is easy.

  • regardless_of

    Surprisingly , the centuries old practice of subjugation of women in India ,still continues in 21st century, where an adult woman cannot choose who she can marry , what her faith should be ,or what she should wear ,,

  • RageOfSimba

    how to stop this?

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  • regardless_of

    It’s very unfortunate nowadays that journalism inspired by hate spreading of rss had stooped so low! instead of an introspection on hostile Hindu practices against women, this article is trying to portray that an adult girl has been”forced”to escape a life of oppression and subjugation.grow up “Hindu isis” !!

    • Berserker

      yes you mullehs have such friendly practices for women…covering 2 year olds in burqas….and hindu isis …..you are so funny..

  • Manthra koliyer

    Religion should not be forced on anybody.

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    If it indeed it was forced conversion it is a truly sad news with complicated implications for country.

  • sas_sarma

    The time has come to ban conversions, declare India as Hindu state. Those who talk of freedom of religion should do it in Saudi Arabia, Iran and other countries. The conversion through sword is as dangerous as conversion through smile and service.

  • Zimbobaba

    When Turkey govt.,banned Khaffiye ( muslim caps ) in Turkey there was a huge opposition in muslim world including India. Even Gandhi asked hindus to stand by the freedom of Muslim “brothers”. Muslims took out violent rallies thru out India. While doing so, they hurt Hindus out of anger and forcibly converted nearly 30,000 hindus in Mallaparam district in India. Gandhi was compelled to roll back the agitation.

    In Kerala, Catholics are busy converting hindus. They joined muslims, keeping a watchful eye on them too as they hate the muslims too. Both, Muslims and catholics also use communists to hurt and kill hindus deliberately brutally . But muslims intimidate hindus and christians alike under the full protection of Sonia Gandhi and AP combo.

    The fattu Mawalli baxxxrds like Rajdeep, Barkha, Karan , etc….are silent. They themselves are so much afraid and become gilipil to talk about muslims. They are shamelessly busy abusing Modi, bcs. it is easy.

  • regardless_of

    Surprisingly , the centuries old practice of subjugation of women in India ,still continues in 21st century, where an adult woman cannot choose who she can marry , what her faith should be ,or what she should wear ,,

  • RageOfSimba

    how to stop this?

Next Story

“Legalize Torture? It’s Tortured Logic”

Though, The torture could not proceed without medical supervision

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Torture
Torture is admittedly an extremely difficult issue to confront. It is so morally reprehensible that we are understandably reluctant to even consider the possibility that it could ever be justified, under any circumstances. Pixabay

By Sam Ben-Meir 

Kathryn Bigelow’s Zero Dark Thirty (2013) starred Jessica Chastain as Maya, a tough, brilliant and single-minded CIA agent who is prepared to use Torture in the interrogation of suspected terrorists. There was nothing sadistic about her character, and she comes to doubt the efficacy of torture – though in the end she is able to learn the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden, which she could not have done, the film suggests, had she been unwilling to employ “enhanced interrogation techniques.” This assertion, that the use of torture did in fact produce useful intelligence that helped lead the U.S. to bin Laden, sparked debate as well as outrage.

The Report (2019) is, among other things, writer-director Scott Z Burns’ answer to Zero Dark Thirty. It is largely about another single-minded individual, Daniel J. Jones (Adam Driver), lead investigator of the Senate Intelligence Committee, who spent five arduous years doggedly uncovering the CIA’s suspect detention and interrogation program following the 9/11 terrorist attacks. His investigation eventually culminated in a 6,700-page report, a damning exposé of the CIA’s methods of “enhanced interrogation” and the psychologists who helped design them – methods which included walling, cramped confinement, stress positions, waterboarding, the use of insects, and mock burial – despite having no interrogation experience. Like Jones, the film is unwavering not only in its moral condemnation of torture, but in its claim that torture is not effective and never produces real, actionable intelligence.

Torture is admittedly an extremely difficult issue to confront. It is so morally reprehensible that we are understandably reluctant to even consider the possibility that it could ever be justified, under any circumstances. The problem is that the world is a messy place – it isn’t morally tidy – and sometimes the right thing to do is not available to us. According to the American Field Manual, rulebook of military interrogators, “The use of force is a poor technique, as it yields unreliable results, may damage subsequent collection efforts and can induce the source to say whatever he thinks the interrogator wants to hear.” However, if we are to deal honestly with this issue, we must recognize the fact that there is substantial evidence that sometimes torture is effective in eliciting information and, indeed, it has been known to save innocent lives.

In Why Terrorism Works (2002), Alan Dershowitz writes, “There can be no doubt that torture sometimes works. Jordan apparently broke the notorious terrorist of the 1980s, Abu Nidal, by threatening his mother. Philippine police reportedly help crack the 1993 World Trade Center bombings by torturing a suspect.” If, in certain dire situations, something like nonlethal torture may be justifiable then it appears we should at least consider Dershowitz’s suggestion that if and when torture is practiced, that it is done in accordance with law and with some kind of warrant issued by a judge.

“I’m not in favor of torture,” Dershowitz writes, “but if you’re going to have it, it should damn well have court approval.” His claim is that if we are, in fact, going to torture then it ought to be done in accordance with law: for tolerating torture while pronouncing it illegal is hypocritical. In other words, democratic liberalism ought to own up to its own activities, according to Dershowitz. If torture is, indeed, a reality then it should be done with accountability.

There are, however, significant problems with the reasoning behind torture-warrants. For one, the legalization of torture would significantly distort our moral experience of the world, corroding the very notion of law itself, which does not rule through abject terror: law is, after all, meant to replace sheer brutality as a way of getting people to do things. Indeed, the rule against torture is paradigmatic of what we mean by law itself. In short, to have torture as law is undermining of what we take the very rule of law to signify.

Torture
When Torture is practiced, one should ensure that it is done in accordance with law and with some kind of warrant issued by a judge. Pixabay

Such considerations are closely connected with the following concern which is addressed in The Report: namely, what are the consequences of institutionalizing torture? That is clearly what the introduction of torture-warrants would imply – and once you institutionalize torture you then have to elaborate on all aspects, including the training not only of would-be torturers but also medical personnel. In other words, the legalization of interrogational torture would apparently require the professionalization of torture; that is, the acceptance of torture as a profession.

This normalization is especially disquieting when we stop to consider in particular the role of doctors and medical professionals in torture: for nothing is more antagonistic to what we mean by medicine then its utilization in the prolongation of a person’s agony and brutalization. Sadly, the participation of medical practitioners in torture is nothing new; and we would do well to remind ourselves of that history, for we are now most certainly part of it.

In his book Torture, Edward Peters observes that it was under the Third Reich that torture was “transformed into a medical specialty, a transformation which was to have great consequences in the second half of the twentieth century.” Medical involvement in torture first came to world attention with the disclosure of practices in Nazi concentration camps. The Nuremberg trials revealed that physicians had, for example, placed prisoners in low-pressure tanks simulating high altitude, immersed them in near-freezing water, and had them injected with live typhus organisms.

It is likely that hundreds of doctors and nurses participated in these experiments, although only twenty-one German physicians were charged with medical crimes. What needs to be emphasized is a point that Robert Jay Lifton, M.D. makes with what he calls an “atrocity-producing situation” – by which he refers to an environment “so structured, psychologically and militarily, that ordinary people can readily engage in atrocities.” As Lifton observes, many Nazi doctors were engaged not in cruel medical experiments, but directly involved in killing. To get to that point, however, they had to undergo a process of socialization; first to the medical profession, then to the military, and finally to the concentration camps: “The great majority of these doctors were ordinary people who had killed no one before joining murderous Nazi institutions. They were corruptible and certainly responsible for what they did, but they became murderers mainly in atrocity-producing settings.”

Referring to the CIA program, Atul Gawande, a surgeon and author, observed that “The torture could not proceed without medical supervision. The medical profession was deeply embedded in this inhumanity.” In fact, the program was developed by two psychologists, Jim Mitchell and Bruce Jessen, who – as the film relates – based their recommendations on the theory of “learned helplessness,” which essentially describes a condition in which an individual, repeatedly subjected to negative, painful stimuli, comes to view their situation as beyond their control and themselves as powerless to effect any change. The crucial point is that medical professionals were an integral part of the program. Referring to American doctors that were involved in the torture at Abu Ghraib, Robert Lifton points out, “Even without directly participating in the abuse, doctors may have become socialized to an environment of torture and by virtue of their medical authority helped sustain it.”

We can hardly underestimate the significance of the process of socialization in facilitating participation in torture. Certain factors are decisive in terms of weakening the moral restraints against performing acts that individuals would normally find unacceptable. Following Harvard University professor of social ethics, Herbert Kelman, we can ide