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Apple Maps Rolls Out Turn-by-Turn Directions in India

Disregarding quality of source data, many people prefer to use Apple Maps, because of its prettier, cleaner and ad-free user interface, the report added

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Apple, smartphone
Customers walk past an Apple logo inside of an Apple store at Grand Central Station in New York, Aug. 1, 2018. VOA

Aiming to make GPS navigation better and ride-hailing easier for iPhone users in India, Apple on Thursday rolled out turn-by-turn directions as well as support for cab-hailing apps Uber and Ola in Apple Maps in the country.

“Adding regional turn-by-directions makes owning Apple devices that much more appealing for domestic customers, as Apple Maps integrates so well with the system platforms.

“You could always download a third-party maps app on the App Store, but features like proactive alerts, or Apple Watch navigation are best offered by Apple Maps,” 9to5Mac reported.

Apple, Iphone XR, Apple Watch
Now, Apple Maps gets turn-by-turn directions in India. Flickr Commons

Apple Maps’ rival Google Maps has been the de facto navigation application in India for quite some time now, thanks to the popularity of Android and the driving, walking and public transport modes in it.

Also Read- Huawei Launches its Quad-Camera Phone Y9 in India

Disregarding quality of source data, many people prefer to use Apple Maps, because of its prettier, cleaner and ad-free user interface, the report added. (IANS)

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)