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Army to release a new book on 1965 war that will show how India won the war

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

New Delhi: The outcome of the 1965 India-Pakistan war has been shrouded in mystery due to conflicting claims and reports by the both sides. While India has maintained that the result was kind of a stalemate though India had the upper hand, Pakistan has for long claimed decisive victory for itself. Pakistan even celebrates September 6th as “Defense of Pakistan Day.”

India Pakistan War 1965Now, for the first time, Indian Army is bringing out a new book on the war, that counter’s the assertions of the Pakistan’s claim to victory and tries to establish how India decisively won the war.

The book is a part of an ongoing project taken up by the Defense Ministry to re-write histories of various wars and major operations, so that they can be made simple and reader friendly, according to a report published in Times of India.

The new book, which has been commissioned by the Army’s official think-tank “Centre for Land Warfare Studies,” will be written by defense analyst Nitin Gokhale and will be titled “1965, Turning the Tide: How India Won the War”.

The book says that India not only thwarted Pakistan’s plans against India, it also inflicted great damage and losses on the Pakistan’s military. The book supports these assertions by showing how India lost only 540 square km to Pakistan while it captured 1,920 square km of Pakistani territory; India lost 2,862 soldiers against Pakistan’s 5,800; and India lost less than 100 tanks whereas Pakistan lost around 450 tanks, as per TOI report.

Meanwhile, Indian Air Force’s new history debunks Pakistan’s claim to victory in aerial combat during 1965 war.

The book gains significance in the backdrop of Narendra Modi government’s decision to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the war as a great victory for India.

Next Story

Does India’s Giant Step in the Direction of Green Energy Signal an End to Coal?

Coal consumption forecasts have already been downgraded significantly from 2013 projections, and major shifts in energy policy like Modi’s are likely to add significant weight to the idea that India might well become a much bigger player in renewable energy production in the next 20 to 30 years

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FILE - Smoke billows from chimneys of the cooling towers of a coal-fired power plant in Dadong, Shanxi province, China. VOA

When Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government announced its target to increase India’s renewable energy capacity to an equivalent of 40% of the nation’s total green energy output, it raised eyebrows. Could this mean an end to India’s coking coal industry?

Is there investment for green energy?

For any alternative to coal to be a serious consideration, there must be investment sources. Already India’s renewable target has attracted investors like Japan’s SoftBank, which agreed to a deal to sell power generated from a Northern Indian solar bank at 2.4 rupees per unit – below that of coal power, which currently costs over 3 rupees per unit.

Contrary to the enormous investment in the production of solar panels being manufactured by China, which has made them cheap enough to encourage this Indian growth in solar renewable energy, there has been relatively little investment in Indian coal.

Asia-Pacific
Workers operate machines at a coal mine at Palaran district in Samarinda, Indonesia (VOA)

For instance, state-run NTPC has cancelled several large coal mining projects, including a huge plant in Andhra Pradesh. Meanwhile, the private sector has continued investing in renewables. Adani Power has over $600 million invested in solar panels in the southern state of Tamil Nadu.

That Modi has made an investment of $42 billion in the renewable energy sector over the past four years and his renewables plan is likely to generate a further $80 billion in the green energy sector in the next four years is good news for the Rupee. External investment in India is likely a sign of increased currency transaction in forex trading signalling the Rupee gaining strength against other pairs. Like the Indian economy, millions of dollars are traded on currencies every day, and increased interest in the Rupee helps cement India’s economic and investment potential.

How reliant is India on coal power?

Not so long ago the Indian government had a target to connect 40 million households to the national grid by the end of 2018. It even tasked CIL, the state coal monopoly, to produce over a billion tonnes of coal per year by 2020, an increase of almost 100% from 2016. It’s an ambitious goal, notwithstanding the environmental impacts of mining for such an unprecedented amount of coal. This is the same coal that already generates 70% of India’s primary commercial energy requirement; compare that figure to the UK’s 11%, Germany’s 38%, and China’s 68%, while France has practically shut all of its coal power stations. This means that India’s shift from coal could have important implications for the global climate, and any investors looking towards coal would be making a very brave and risky decision.

Coal
Environmentally, coal isn’t a sustainable source of power, certainly not in current quotas.

The increasing problem with relying on coal

Environmentally, coal isn’t a sustainable source of power, certainly not in current quotas. Clean-up costs could make coal an out-of-date power source sooner rather than later. A report by Oxford University estimated that investors in coal power may lose upwards of half a trillion dollars because assets cannot be profitably run or retired early due to global temperature rises and agreed carbon emission reductions.

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Coal consumption forecasts have already been downgraded significantly from 2013 projections, and major shifts in energy policy like Modi’s are likely to add significant weight to the idea that India might well become a much bigger player in renewable energy production in the next 20 to 30 years – although it’s difficult not to see coal remaining an important power source considering India’s significantly large coal reserves still available in Eastern India.