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Artists Exploring the Common Connection between the Urban Core of both Delhi and San Francisco

The exhibition is a group show of video installations, performances and artworks featuring artists from China, Iran, India, Singapore and Peru

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Urban core and its intricasies and alienation
Exploring the intricasies of Urban culture(representative image). Wikimedia commons
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New Delhi, December 12, 2016:  Modern metropolis has nuclearized every aspect of human beings. People tend to alienate themselves from others due to lack of time and intense pressure. This form has found its expression in an exhibition here by international artists.

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The exhibition is a group show of video installations, performances, and artworks featuring artists from China, Iran, India, Singapore, and Peru. It is titled as “Frozen World of the Familiar Stranger.”

In a curatorial collaboration both KADIST(an experimental art space in San Francisco), and Khoj International Artists Association, New Delhi, both have come up with this excellent presentations. It is being co-curated by Sitara Chowfla and Heidi Rabben.

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Explaining the approach of this exhibition Sitara Chowfla says, “Through works exploring isolation, confinement, collapse, of inhabiting collective urban space, Frozen World offers an almost satirical point of view on the human condition and what it means to be alive together in the present, and in the constructed future.”

The show aims to establish a different perspective of history, culture, and memory that informs about the common connection between the urban core of both Delhi and San Francisco.

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La Town (2014), a video work of Chinese artist Cao Fei showcases the picture of a world suspended somewhere between reality and dystopia, mentioned PTI.

Her work, inspired by Asian pop culture, vividly reflects the changes in lifestyle, culture, and identity in times of globalization and also poses questions about the future of humanity, isolation, and connectivity in a city.

Fei is one of the most influential figures from the generation of Chinese artists that has emerged on the global scene in the last decade.

prepared by Saptaparni Goon of NewsGram. Twitter: @saptaparni_goon

 

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Artist Renuka Rajiv Takes on Society, Gender Through Personal Narrative

Rajiv, who narrates not verbally but visually, says the "need for the visual arises from a need to communicate, but this need to communicate remains outside the realm of verbal languages."

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Rajiv described the prints as a "cathartic series" made while living in Melbourne. Flickr Commons

Exhibiting the interplay between words and visuals, a solo show by artist Renuka Rajiv critically chronicles and comments on matters of sexuality, gender, physicality and notions of family and relationships via personal narratives.

“The Future Is Not My Gender” is a multidisciplinary exhibition, showing different renditions of fabric and paper using drawings, paper mache, tie-dye and embroidery.

It is on at the Vahdera Art Gallery here till August 18.

It includes a large body of textile and embroidery works, sculptures, and twenty four monotypes selected from a larger series of three hundred prints.

The fabric works are mostly made with old garments of the artist’s family and friends.

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“The Future Is Not My Gender” is a multidisciplinary exhibition. Flickr Common

“This is a moment in a long-term exploration of expressing the aspects of my reality that are outside the material world,” the Bengaluru-based artist said about the exhibition.

Rajiv described the prints as a “cathartic series” made while living in Melbourne.

Some drawings also weave visuals with verbal interjections — sharp observations around gender and sexuality within the larger social context.

“With a strong inclination towards the spontaneously created “hand-made” works, the exhibition accommodates the imaginative, observational and autobiographical,” Vahdera Art Gallery said in a statement.

Rajiv, who narrates not verbally but visually, says the “need for the visual arises from a need to communicate, but this need to communicate remains outside the realm of verbal languages”.

Also Read: US Painted in New Colours By a Refugee Artist

Rajiv was the recipient of the Emerging Artist Award (EAA) 2016, awarded by the Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art (FICA) in collaboration with Pro Helvetia, the Swiss Arts Council.

The exhibition is a culmination of the award process including a three-month residency in Switzerland in 2017. (IANS)