Tuesday May 21, 2019

Assamese – a bright spot in Indian regional languages scene

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By Harshmeet Singh

There aren’t many better examples of India’s diverse culture than its linguistic diversity. The country is home to 780 languages with over 120 of them holding the ‘official’ status. But the other side of the story is that India currently heads the list of UNESCO’s world’s languages in danger.

The constitution, in its eighth schedule, lists 22 languages as the official regional languages in the country. This series of articles is an attempt to focus on these 22 languages, their pasts and present, and cherish our linguistic diversity. We start the series today with Assamese.

The official language of the state of Assam, Assamese has more than 13 million native speakers. Apart from Assam, it also finds a considerable number of speakers in Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland and even Bangladesh and Bhutan. It is widely regarded as the easternmost language of the Indo-Aryan family.

Unlike most other Indian languages, Assamese doesn’t trace its origins to Sanskrit. But due to the migration of people in large numbers from north India to the northeastern parts of the country, the language came under the influence of Sanskrit. The script of the language is very similar to the scripts of Maithili and Bengali languages.

The northeast region boasts of a strong literary history and tradition. Archeologists have recovered a number of copper plates and edicts dating back to the medieval times. In Assam, ancient religious texts were usually written on saanchi tree’s bark. Since then, the language has evolved considerably. A number of spellings in the Assamese language don’t follow the rules of phonetics. Hemkosh, an Assamese dictionary based on the Sanskrit spellings of words, was compiled by Hemchandra Barua in the year 1900. It has come to be known as the standard reference for the language.

Assamese remains one of the few regional languages in the country which has managed to hold its own over the centuries. Just earlier this week, the famous Tezpur University, in collaboration with the century old Asomia Club, decided to teach Assamese language to the students, researchers and officials coming to the state from different parts of the country. It would help break the linguistic barriers between the locals and the outside people residing in the state.

One of the organizers behind the initiative, Hemanta Lahkar, told TOI, “Our aim is to popularize Assamese among the people who are spending time in the state and will go to other parts of the country in the years to come. Learning Assamese will certainly bridge a lot of gaps. We believe this would act as a bond among people in this diverse country.”

Initiatives such as these combined with a sustained pride of the Assamese people in their mother tongue would ensure that Assamese thrives further in the times to come.

Next Story

TikTok ‘Safety Centre’ Now in 10 Indian Languages

With the launch of the localised website, users across India can also learn to keep their accounts private, the need to use strong passwords and avoid spreading personal information

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TikTok has over 54 million monthly active users (MAUs) in India. Pixabay

China-based short video sharing platform TikTok on Wednesday launched a localised version of its “Safety Centre” with safety policies, tools and resources in 10 Indian languages.

The “Safety Centre” aims to educate users about protection measures while using the platform and is now available in Hindi, Telugu, Tamil, Gujarati, Malayalam and Punjabi, among other languages.

It also leads users to two resource pages that would help tackle anti-bullying as well as an advisory for the upcoming Lok Sabha polls.

The logo of the TikTok application is seen on a screen in this picture illustration taken Feb. 21, 2019. VOA

“Since the launch of TikTok in India, we have seen phenomenal user growth.

“With the launch of our localised Safety Centre along with our resource pages for anti-bullying and the general elections, we aim to reaffirm our commitment to India and ensure a safe and positive online environment,” Helena Lersch, Director, Global Public Policy, TikTok, said in a statement.

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With the launch of the localised website, users across India can also learn to keep their accounts private, the need to use strong passwords and avoid spreading personal information. (IANS)