Wednesday July 17, 2019

Avoid Staring Screen Before Bedtime

Insufficient sleep is associated with impaired immune responses, depression, anxiety and obesity in children and adolescents.

0
//
A person using Smartphone, Wikimedia

Using mobile phones or watching TV in a dark bedroom just ahead of bedtime can sabotage your sleep more than when used in a well lit room or not using them at all, researchers say.

“While previous research has shown a link between screen use and the quality and length of young people’s sleep, ours is the first study to show how room lighting can further influence this,” said lead author Michael Mireku from the University of Lincoln in the UK.

Insufficient sleep is associated with impaired immune responses, depression, anxiety and obesity in children and adolescents.

The study, published in the journal Environment International, found that night-time use of phones, tablets and laptops is consistently associated with poor sleep quality, insufficient sleep, and poor perceived quality of life.

sleeping, impairment, inflammation, SLeep
  Insufficient sleep is associated with impaired immune responses, depression, anxiety and obesity in children and adolescents. . Pixabay

For the study, the research team collected data from 6,616 adolescents aged between 11 and 12 and more than 70 per cent reported using at least one screen-based device within one hour of their bedtime.

They were asked to self-report a range of factors including their device use in both lit and darkened rooms, their weekday and weekend bedtimes, how difficult they found it to go to sleep and their wake up times.

The results showed that those who used a phone or watched television in a room with a light on were 31 per cent more likely to get less sleep than those who didn’t use a screen.

mobile phone
Using mobile phones or watching TV in a dark bedroom just ahead of bedtime can sabotage your sleep. VOA

 

Also Read:Alzheimer’s Linked To Improper Sleep In Elderly: Study
The likelihood increased to 147 per cent if the same activity took place in the dark.

It has been reported that globally, 90 per cent of adolescents are not sleeping the recommended nine to 11 hours per night, which has coincided with an increase in the use of screen-based media devices.

Previous studies have shown that sufficient sleep duration and quality are vital in childhood to maintain physical and mental development. (IANS)

Next Story

Unable to Sleep at Night? This One Trick Can Help Advance Snooze Time by 2 Hours

Having a late sleep pattern puts you at odds with the standard societal days

0
Sleep, Night, Trick
Such changes can also lead to improved performance in the mornings. Pixabay

Researchers have found that a simple tweak to the sleeping patterns and maximising outdoor light during the mornings for a period of three weeks can help night owls — people with extreme late sleeping and waking habits – bring forward their sleep/wake timings by two hours.

Such changes can also lead to improved performance in the mornings, better eating habits and a decrease in depression and stress among people with late sleeping habits, showed the findings.

The study, published in the journal Sleep Medicine, showed that it was possible to shift the circadian rhythm of ‘night owls’ using non-pharmacological and practical interventions.

“Having a late sleep pattern puts you at odds with the standard societal days, which can lead to a range of adverse outcomes – from daytime sleepiness to poorer mental wellbeing,” said study co-author Andrew Bagshaw from the University of Birmingham in the UK.

Sleep, Night, Trick
A simple tweak to the sleeping patterns and maximising outdoor light during the mornings for a period of three weeks can help night owls. Pixabay

The researchers wanted to see if simple things could solve this issue.

In an experiment with a small group of participants that spanned for three weeks, the group were asked to wake up two-three hours before regular wake up time and maximise outdoor light during the mornings.

They were also asked to go to bed two-three hours before habitual bedtime and limit light exposure in the evening, have fixed sleep/wake times on both work days and free days and have breakfast as soon as possible after waking up, eat lunch at the same time each day, and refrain from eating dinner after 7 p.m.

“We wanted to see if there were simple things people could do at home to solve this issue. This was successful, on average allowing people to get to sleep and wake up around two hours earlier than they were before,” Bagshaw said.

Also Read- Cisco Unleashes the Capabilities of the New Network

“Most interestingly, this was also associated with improvements in mental wellbeing and perceived sleepiness, meaning that it was a very positive outcome for the participants.” (IANS)