Tuesday November 19, 2019
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Badarpur-Faridabad metro corridor: NCR’s first solar equipped metro line

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

New Delhi: Delhi-NCR’s first solar-equipped Badarpur-Faridabad Metro corridor will be inaugurated by PM Modi on Sunday, which will hopefully provide relief to 1.95 lakh passengers per day by December 2015.

violet-line-delhi-metro
credits: indiaonlinepages

It will be the first corridor in which all the stations and depots will be equipped with solar power plants and would ensure commuting to the Delhi suburb gets quicker.

The 13.87 km Delhi (Badarpur)-Faridabad (Escorts Mujesar) Metro corridor is equipped with solar power generation facilities at all stations and depots.

The new facility will also ease out travelling for commuters who have to presently rely on shared auto rickshaws and state buses for their further journey to Faridabad from Badarpur Metro Station.

“I stay in Faridabad Sector 86. Everyday it takes about 30 minutes to reach the Badarpur metro station by an autorickshaw from my house. The distance is about 11 km. The Metro will help reduce the travel time significantly,” said Suresh Kumar, who works in a media organisation.

The new corridor will have Delhi Metro’s first ever green electrical Receiving Sub Station (RSS) with a host of eco-friendly features and this will be constructed at Faridabad to cater to the energy requirements of the upcoming completely elevated corridor.

The Rs.2,900-crore project, an extension of the currently operational violet line between ITO and Badarpur – will have nine stations — Sarai, NHPC Chowk, Mewala Maharajpur, Sector 28, Badkal Mor, Old Faridabad, Neelam Chowk Ajronda, Bata Chowk and Escorts Mujesar.

A media preview and train ride was organised by Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) on the Faridabad corridor on Friday.

Talking to reporters, Anuj Dayal, executive director (corporate communications), Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC), said: “Two more stations at NCB Colony and Ballabhgarh will also be added to this line by 2017, which will increase the length of the line by 3.2 km.”

“This is the first solar line in Delhi. These solar plants will partially fulfill the energy requirements of the corridor. The minimum rate of tickets will start from Rs.8,” Dayal added.

The depot for this section has been constructed near Sector 20A in Faridabad and will be called Ajronda Depot.

Stating that the power generated would be used for the lighting and other auxiliary requirements of the station and depot buildings, Dayal said: “The power Receiving Sub Station (RSS) of the Faridabad corridor has already been developed as a green building with a 50 KWp solar plant, rain water harvesting and constructed wet land type of sewage treatment plant facilities.”

From ITO, the section will expand up to Kashmere Gate on the other side.

Once fully operational, Line-6 will run from Kashmere Gate to Ballabhgarh along 46.60 km and 34 stations. Of these, five – Kashmere Gate, Mandi House, Central Secretariat, Lajpat Nagar and Kalkaji Mandir – will be interchange stations.

(With inputs from IANS)

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Experts Advocate Airshed Management To Tackle Pollution

Experts have advocated airshed management to tackle pollution as air pollution is severe

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Air pollution
Airshed management will be helping in tackling air pollution. Pixabay

Amid pollution turning into a serious national issue and the National Clean Air Programme (NCAP) largely staying limited to Delhi, experts here on Monday advocated airshed management to tackle pollution.

These experts and pollution control boards officials were participating in a panel discussion, organised by Climate Trends, a Delhi-based climate communications initiative, to map the pathway for regional cooperation and coordination to tackle the crisis.

Sagnik Dey, Associate Professor at IIT-Delhi and Coordinator for the Centre for Excellence for Research for Clean Air (CERCA), said, “We live in the age of data, yet there is no air pollution data for the entire rural India.”

To address the problem of air pollution comprehensively, Dey said, “We need to delineate airsheds based on wind flows and their pollutant reach. The city action plans should be integrated with the larger airshed management strategy to to deal with the problem.”

Haryana, despite not being included in the NCAP, is the only state that has made an action plan for Gurugram that will include 300 km of the surrounding area as shared airshed where pollution transfer happens.

The entire NCAP rested on the Central Pollution Control Board and the state pollution control boards but their resource and capacity must be evaluated and enhanced, Dey said. “Monitoring and compliance are key to success. Unless the central, state and municipal bodies work in tandem, we will return to these pollution spikes each year,” Dey said.

Delhi, air Polltuion
To address the problem of air pollution comprehensively, airsheds based on wind flows and their pollutant reach need to be delineated. Pixabay

Analysis of November 1-15 data from urban sciences across 26 cities in the Indo-Gangetic Plain showed that nine cities were in severe air quality category, including satellite towns like Ghaziabad and Noida, with Delhi ranked fifth behind Ghaziabad, Noida and Greater Noida.

A 2012 study by IIT-Delhi mapped the aerosol transfer across the Indo-Gangetic region, making it the world’s most polluted hotspot — stretching from Punjab, Haryana, Delhi, UP, Bihar and all the way to West Bengal.

Haryana with five of the 10 most polluted cities in this study, has no city listed amongst the 102+20 NCAP cities.

The analysis further highlighted how Gurugram, spread across 732 sq km, has two monitoring stations against 35 in Delhi, which has double the area of its neighbour.

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Ronak Sutaria, CEO, Urban Sciences, said, “It’s going to be a challenge to scale up monitoring to 1,000 monitors in the country as per the NCAP due to cost. But that too is not enough as all studies say 4,000-6,000 monitors are needed for adequate coverage.”

The Indo-Gangetic plain has a complex set of topographical and meteorological conditions that produce a land-locked valley effect. These conditions are monitored for forecast, though the lack of adequate set of monitoring devices and suitable presentation for ease of understanding have limited the ability of the responsible agencies to act proactively. (IANS)