Saturday August 18, 2018
Home World Balance of po...

Balance of power starting to shift, says Edward Snowden

0
//
21
Republish
Reprint

edward-snowden-294154_640

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Two years after disclosing that the National Security Agency was spying on their innocent citizens, Edward Snowden, in an New York Times opinion piece published on Thursday, made a striking remark that the “balance of power is beginning to shift.”

The former intelligence analyst claims that a “post-terror generation” is arising that refuses to justify the practice of mass surveillance out of fear.

Alluding to the present week’s ending of the bulk data collection program under the USA Patriot Act, Snowden said, “Ending the mass surveillance of private phone calls under the Patriot Act is a historic victory for the rights of every citizen, but it is only the latest product of a change in global awareness.”

Snowden said the goal was accomplished by “the power of an informed public.” He stated that the end of the mass surveillance of private telephone calls under the US Patriot Act was a “landmark victory for the rights of each citizen”.

“Since 2013, institutions across Europe have declared laws and similar operations illegal and imposed new restrictions on such activities in the future. The UN has said that mass surveillance was clearly a violation of human rights.”

“In Latin America, Brazilian citizens’ efforts have led to the adoption of the Marco Civil, the first declaration of the rights of the internet in the world. Recognising the essential role of an informed public in correcting excesses of government, the Council of Europe called for the adoption of new laws to prevent the persecution of whistleblowers.”

The former National Security Agency worker said, “Basic technical protection safeguards such as encryption … are now enabled by default in the products of pioneering companies such as Apple, which ensures that even if your phone is stolen, your private life remains private.”

However, he also warned that the right to privacy is still under threat.

“As you read this online, the United States government makes a note,” he added.

The computer analyst remains wanted by the United States for espionage following his sensational leaks that fetched him a title of a traitor in some political sectors. However, he was majorly regarded as a hero.

Snowden has been given temporary residency in Russia.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Teenage Fan of Apple Cracks its Secure Systems

The magistrate has acknowledged the teenager's guilty plea and he is set to be sentenced next month due to the "complexities" of the case

0
Apple
Teenager Apple fan hacks into its secure systems.

An Australian teenager pleaded guilty to charges of hacking into Apple’s secure systems and said that he was a fan of the technology giant and hoped to work there one day, the media reported.

The 16-year-old boy is facing criminal charges after the technology giant called in the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

“The teen, who cannot be named for legal reasons, broke into Apple’s mainframe from his suburban home on multiple occasions over a year because he was such a fan of the company, according to his lawyer,” The Age reported late on Thursday.

The teenager, who studies in a private school, reportedly stored the saved information in a folder titled “hacky hack hack”.

Apple
The 16-year-old boy is facing criminal charges after the technology giant called in the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Pixabay

He was able to access authorized keys, view customer accounts and download 90GB of secure files before being caught.

 “The teen’s defence lawyer said his client had become so well known in the international hacking community that even mentioning the case in detail could expose him to risk,” the report added.
You May Also Like to Read About the New Low Protein Wheat Breed- Wheat Breeds with Low Protein Might Provide Hope to People with Gluten Allergies

The magistrate has acknowledged the teenager’s guilty plea and he is set to be sentenced next month due to the “complexities” of the case. (IANS)

Next Story