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Ballochpura: Agra too has Baloch connection, stands united for Balochistan Freedom Movement

Social activist Vishal Sharma also says, there were two Billochpuras in Agra, one near the Taj Mahal and one closer to Agra Mental Asylum

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Demonstration in Quetta, Balochistan, Pakistan. Image source: Flickr

 

  • Hundreds of ethnic Balochis living in Agra place called “Ballochpura”
  • Leader of Local Baloch community Razak Khan assured Baloch Freedom activist that people of Agra will support the movement
  • Razak Khan will lead a deputation of local Balochs to areas of western UP and Baghpat in Haryana

September 24, 2016: Raising the issue of Balochistan in his Independence day speech PM Modi was admired in all over Agra for taking a firm stand against the atrocities by Pakistani Army on the people of Baloch, but until the last week, residents of Agra were totally unaware of this fact that there are hundreds of ethnic Balochis living there in a place called “Ballochpura” which is in the center of Agra.

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“PM Modi’s speech is proved to be a boon in a Baloch Freedom Movement.” Baloch Freedom Activist Mazdak Dilshad Baloch when visited this place and contacted this minority community for the support they showed full spirit. The leader of Local Baloch community Razak Khan came forward and assured that all the Baloch community people of Agra will Support the movement, mentioned India Today report.

The news portal said that the villagers also showed a lot of enthusiasm to support the Baloch cause. A local resident of Billochpura village, said, “The visiting delegation of Baloch expatriates shared hair-raising stories of mass suffering at the hands of the Pakistani army in Balochistan. We share common roots and we are there with Baloch people in all their endeavours against such atrocities.”

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Razak Khan said that he is waiting for the festival of Eid-ul-Adha to get over. As soon as it will over he will lead a deputation of local Balochs to areas of western UP that have ethnic Balochs living there, including Bagpat in Haryana among other cities

“Although some may consider Modi’s mention of Balochistan as interference in Pakistan’s internal affairs but Modi was following a policy of “reciprocity” with Pakistan by mentioning Balochistan in reply of Pakistan’s mention of Kashmir,” said social activist Vishal Sharma.

He said that opposition parties who are criticising Modi for mentioning Balochistan and blaming him for sparking in that Pakistan-occupied territory should also have the guts to criticise the separatist leaders living in India who openly voice pro-Pakistan statements, mentioned India Today report.

Social activist Vishal Sharma also said that there were two Billochpuras in Agra, one near the Taj Mahal and one closer to Agra Mental Asylum.

He said that although it was quite heartwarming to see scenes from Balochistan where Baloch leaders were praising India and shouting “Bharat mata ki jai”, but if the local Baloch leaders are willing to support the separatist movement in Balochistan, they should be aware of the fact that India officially frowns upon groups causing unrest in other countries, which includes Pakistan and its occupied territories.

Sharma said that “Modi has given a completely new turn to the Baloch Freedom Movement and to the issue of Kashmir also.”

– prepared by Aakash Mandyal of NewsGram. Twitter: @Aakashsen6

 

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India’s First Partition Museum in Amritsar to Mark 70 Years of Independence From Colonial Rule

The museum is a nonprofit trust that has raised money from companies including the Hindustan Times and Airtel and individuals such as Suhel Seth

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Museum
Refugees en route to Pakistan during partition. Wikimedia
  • To mark seven decades of India and Pakistan as independent nations, a new museum has been inaugurated
  • The last of the 14 galleries of the museum is known as the Gallery of Hope, where visitors are invited to write down messages
  • Ahluwalia said she wanted to establish the museum after hearing her 83-year-old grandmother’s stories of the subcontinent for years

Amritsar, India, August 18, 2017: 70 years have passed since Pakistan and India were made from the former British colony. Until now, there had never been an avenue to know about the memorabilia and stories of those individuals who lived through the horror of partition. For marking seven decades of these two nations as independent countries, a new museum has been inaugurated.

“If you look at any other country in the world, they’ve all memorialized the experiences that have defined and shaped them. Yet this event that has so deeply shaped not only our sub-continent but millions of individuals who were impacted has had no museum or memorial 70 years later,” said the Partition Museum’s CEO, Mallika Ahluwalia.

The exhibitions that are held in red-brick building of Town Hall in Amritsar, the border city of north India, include proofs like newspaper clippings, personal items donated and photographs, which show how the area’s freedom fight from colonial rule developed into one of the most violent scenes witnessed by it, as communal clashes killed numerous people of Muslims, Hindus, and Sikhs communities and an additional 15 million dislodged from their ancestors’ homes.

ALSO READ: Top Highlights of PM Narendra Modi’s Speech on India’s 71st Independence Day

An ancient pocket watch belonging to a person killed in Pakistan during mob violence. A traditional cot of rope carried across the border by a refugee. Fabrics which were woven from craftsmen of the time. And various old family photos.

Screens are put that display video interviews of the now-elderly people who survived. The last of the 14 galleries of the museum is known as the Gallery of Hope, wherein visitors are summoned to write down messages of peace and love on papers in the shape of a leaf before putting them on a tree with barbed-wire. The idea, as said by Ahluwalia, was to invite visitors to contribute in the tree’s “greening” and to reflect and encourage peace between the nations.

“You end up feeling so grateful to that generation who, I think, helped rebuild the nation, despite having suffered such trauma,” said Ahluwalia.

She said she wished to establish the partition museum after hearing the stories of her grandmother who is 83-years-old about the subcontinent before the splitting took place and before she was forced to leave her home in Pakistani as a girl of 13 years.

“What must it have felt like for her, to one day come from, you know, a relatively affluent family, have a normal background, and the next day all you have left of your things is a small suitcase,” Ahluwalia said. Her personal experience made her think it was essential to build the museum, “especially as we saw that generation leaving us.”

This museum is more crucial as it is the first partition museum of India, she said. The tickets are rated low in order to motivate people to visit the museum. It is a nonprofit museum and companies like the Hindustan Times and Airtel and individuals like Suhel Seth have helped it raise money. The place was donated by the government of Punjab.

Shiv Visvanathan, a sociologist said that the subject has been painful for several people, and that reconciliation needs the work of both the sides. The museum too, should reveal realities of both sides, he said.

“If a nation-state becomes the repository of memory, it becomes a one-sided memory,” Visvanathan said. “We have to acknowledge the mutuality of violence. There is no one truth. No one victim.”

This museum is situated in Amritsar, well-known for the famous Golden Temple as this city of Punjab marks one of the first arrival points when refugees made their way to India.

-prepared by Harsimran Kaur of NewsGram. Twitter @Hkaur1025

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#BalochGenocide: An Unfortunate Reality to which the World must Pay Attention to

The United Nations has failed to break the ice. Human right violations have failed to bring the attention of global organizations

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Balochistan Genocide
Pakistan is committing inhumane crimes against its own people in the Balochistan province creating an environment of genocide. Twitter
  • The Balochistan province of Pakistan is going through the worst Humanitarian crisis
  • The atrocities committed by the Pakistani forces as well insurgent groups have resulted in destruction of families of the Baloch community
  • It is important that the world community stands with Balochistan and investigate the human rights violations

Balochistan, August 18, 2017: The Balochistan province of Pakistan is in dire need of help from the international community. Ignored by its government at the center and oppressed by the military, the Baloch community is taking desperate measures to call for help from outside.

Balochistan has been an area of instability. Additionally, the coming of the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) is estimated to have adverse consequences for Balochistan.

ALSO READ: World Baloch Organisation Activist Azghar Baloch brings Human Rights Violations to the notice of International Community

The United Nations has failed to break the ice. Human right violations have failed to bring the attention of global organizations.

Abductions and murders surround the lives of Balochistan people. The Chairman of Human Rights Commission in Balochistan, Taj Baloch, has blamed the Pakistan army behind the Balochistan Genocide.

In Berlin, exiled Baloch activists and leaders organized an event titled ‘China’s One Belt One Road Initiative – It’s Adverse Impact on Balochistan & the region’ in which speakers expressed their concerns over the economic reform.

Even the World Balochistan organization has made serious attempts in gathering support for Balochistan from foreign nations. Recently, Azghar Baloch, an activist for the organization, made an appeal from outside the White House called on the international community to stand for the human rights of Baloch people.

Nawab Akbar Bugti was a strong opposer to Pakistan atrocities in Balochistan. He was vocal about the need for Balochistan to separate itself from the inhumane behavior of Pakistan. Nawab Bugti was assassinated on 26 August 2006 by the Pakistani military. To commemorate the anniversary of the martyr, Baloch Republican Party has called for a Balochistan wide strike.

This year when the G20 Summit was held in Germany, Baloch activists turned up outside the venue to protest for Baloch genocides and investigation into

– Compiled by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394


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Balochistan Violence: 13-year-old boy dies after Hindu man arrested for ‘Blasphemy’ charges in Pakistan

Blasphemy, which carries the death penalty, is a sensitive issue in Pakistan, with allegations often prompting mob violence

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FILE -(representational image) Pakistani villagers living at the Line of Control between Pakistan-Indian Kashmir, Chakoti, build concrete house in Pakistan, Nov. 21, 2016. VOA

Balochistan, May 4, 2017: A 13-year-old boy died in aerial firing by police on Thursday after an angry mob in Pakistan’s Balochistan demanded they hand over a Hindu man arrested on blasphemy charges.

Prakash Kumar, 35, was arrested from Hub on Wednesday after locals complained he allegedly sent blasphemous content via WhatsApp, police was quoted as saying by local media.

Police said they had lodged a case against the accused while a cellphone, from which the suspect allegedly shared blasphemous content, has been seized. A local court has sent the suspect to jail for further interrogation in the case.

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A mob soon gathered outside the Hub city police station demanding that Kumar be handed over to them so they could “punish” him. When law enforcement refused, the crowd turned violent.

The police managed to disperse the crowd using tear gas shelling and aerial firing, and also took scores of protesters into custody.

According to police, a teenager died in the violence. The boy was a resident of Pathan Colony and became a victim of aerial firing during the clash which took place near Gaddani bus stop in Hub.

Blasphemy, which carries the death penalty, is a sensitive issue in Pakistan, with allegations often prompting mob violence.

Vigilantes have murdered 65 people over blasphemy allegations since 1990, according to research compiled by the Centre for Research and Security Studies think-tank. (IANS)