Wednesday January 24, 2018

Bangladesh set to execute 1971 War criminal and Jamaat-e-Islami leader Mir Quasem

Quasem had spent a huge sum of money to appoint a US lobbyist to make the war crimes trials controversial

0
//
222
Old Dhaka Central Jail (representational Image). Image source: Wikimedia
Republish
Reprint

Dhaka, September 3, 2016: As Bangladesh jail authorities prepare to execute war criminal Mir Quasem Ali and his family has been asked to meet him for one last time at the Kashimpur Central Jail on Saturday.

The family has come to terms with the execution of Quasem, a Jamaat-e-Islami leader and one of the financiers of the fundamentalist party. Quasem on Friday refused his last lifeline — presidential clemency.

In a Facebook post, Quasem’s daughter Sumaiya Rabeya said her father was a soft-hearted person who would cry every time he made a speech. She said the family was going to meet him, probably for the last time, and had come to terms with his impending execution. This would only make him a martyr, something that he had struggled for during his entire life, said Quasem’s daughter Sumaiya, the Dhaka Tribune reported.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

Quasem’s wife Khandaker Ayesha Khatun has been asked by the prison authorities to meet her husband on Saturday late afternoon.

The execution of death sentence now awaits the government’s clearance. No official announcement was made until Saturday morning about it.

Rayerbazar killing field photographed immediately after the war, showing dead bodies of intellectuals (image courtesy: Rashid Talukdar, 1971). Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Rayerbazar killing field photographed immediately after the war, showing dead bodies of intellectuals (image courtesy: Rashid Talukdar, 1971). Image source: Wikimedia Commons

The jail Superintendent Prashanta Kumar Banik told bdnews24.com on Friday night, “The jail authorities are always ready to carry out the government’s order. The hanging will be executed once clear instructions are received from the top.”

Quasem, 63-year-old Jamaat-e-Islami leader and business tycoon whose atrocities during the 1971 Liberation War in Chittagong earned him the nickname ‘Bangali Khan’, can be executed any time.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

On Wednesday, a day after the Supreme Court upheld his death penalty for war crimes, Quasem had sought time to decide his next course of action.

He was sentenced to death in 2014 by the country’s specially constituted International Crimes Tribunal (ICT), for the atrocities he committed during the 1971 Liberation War as an Al-Badr commander.

His last review petition was rejected by the Appellate Division of the apex court on Tuesday.

Quasem had spent a huge sum of money to appoint a US lobbyist to make the war crimes trials controversial. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Will prohibiting Burqa result in freedom from under house arrest or religious bias?

According to Islam, it is not necessary to cover the face.

0
//
29
Due to Burqa women can go and vote multiple times. This increases corruption in the election. Wikimedia Commons
Due to Burqa women can go and vote multiple times. This increases corruption in the election. Wikimedia Commons

In recent years there have been several incidents involving the Burqa. In 2009, a state college in Karnataka told a student she was not allowed to attend classes wearing a Burqa. It was later reported that the young girl reached a “compromise arrangement” with the college but did not continue in the same college. Days later, violent protests sparked in Hyderabad after a college principal allegedly told students not to wear a Burqa.

But opposite episodes have also occurred. In July 2010, a teacher at Kolkata’s Aliah University, which has a focus on Islamic studies, was not allowed to teach without a Burqa. The report followed an official notice released in April 2010, in which the university dismissed suggestions it enforced a dress code, mentioning specifically the use of the Burqa within its campus.

There is steep rise in the cases related to crime against burqa clad women. Wikimedia Commons
There is a steep rise in the cases related to crime against Burqa-clad women. Wikimedia Commons

At some point imposing a ban on Burqa will be beneficial…
Point 1:
According to Islam, it is not necessary to cover the face. Hands and face can be uncovered. So banning won’t conflict freedom of practicing religion. And it will not be against any religion.
Point 2:
There are security issues. Imagine man/women under burqa leaves a bag in a public place which later blasts. Now, what do police have? CCTV cameras, forget face they cannot determine if is it male or female due to Burqa. It is the biggest security Loophole.
Point 3:
Many Muslim women do not have a bank account because they are not allowed to cover their face in bank premises. If you didn’t know then yes you cannot cover your face with bank premises and ATM.
Point 4:
It’s easy to have multiple voters ID. Due to Burqa women can go and vote multiple times. This increases corruption in the election.
Point 5:
Crimes under Burqa are on the rise. Murder, kidnapping, robbery are been carried out using Burqa. It’s the biggest advantage for criminals.

What Noorjehan Safia says…
Noorjehan Safia Niaz, a founding member of Bhartiya Muslim Mahila Andolan, a movement which works to improve the status of Muslim women in India, said security concerns have not been a major issue when it comes to dressing. “Muslim women in India comply with all the laws. They are active participants when it comes to elections and has their photos on their passports. So identification and security have never been an issue as such,” she said.
Discrimination, however, has sometimes caused problems, said Ms. Niaz. “There are cases when women are not considered for a particular job because they wear a Burqa. In such cases, women have negotiated. They do not wear Burqa while at work but before and after it they put it on.” Overall, Ms. Niaz said that women themselves – not the law – should decide what to wear. “Let each woman decide what she wants to wear. Neither can you enforce a ban on Burqa nor can you force women to wear it.”