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Banned bull-taming sport of Jallikattu receives stronger opposition with Activist’s Letter to the President

PETA also wrote to Tamil Nadu government for calling a ban on the sport

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banned bull taming sport of Tamil Nadu
Jallikattu sport of Tamil Nadu. Wikimedia

Chennai, Jan 13, 2017: The banned bull-taming sport of Jallikattu ordinance grows stronger this week in Tamil Nadu as animal rights groups today wrote to President Pranab Mukherjee and the Centre, arguing against any such possible move.

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People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), which has come under criticism from Jallikattu supporters in the state and Federation of Indian Animal Protection Organizations (FIAPO) have written to Mukherjee, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Environment Minister Anil Madhav Dave in this regard, PETA said in a statement.

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In a release PETA said “In the letters, PETA and FIAPO note that Jallikattu is illegal according to the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960; the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change’s 2011 ban on the use of bulls in performances and a 2014 Supreme Court judgement,”

“PETA also notes that issuing an ordinance to allow the spectacle may be considered unconstitutional and an inappropriate use of power,” it said.


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PETA also wrote to Tamil Nadu government for calling a ban on the sport.

“If miscreants were to enter Lord Shiva’s temple and desecrate Nandi’s idol, people would not stand for it,” PETA India CEO Poorva Joshipura said, adding “so why should we support the abuse of living bulls”.

Meanwhile, FIAPO Director Varda Mehrotra said: “No culture promotes violence, least of all towards animals. Moreover, bovines have always been revered in the Indian culture.

prepared by Saptaparni Goon of NewsGram. Twitter: @saptaparni_goon

 

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Spying Charges On 2 Ex-Twitter Employees for Saudi Arabia

2 former twitter employees were charged with spying for Saudi Arabia

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Spying for Saudi Arabia
Two former Twitter employees have been charged with spying for the Saudi Arabia government. Pixabay

Raising concerns that American technology firms might be exposed to foreign governments, two former Twitter employees have been charged with spying for the Saudi Arabia government and the Kingdom’s royal family, according to the US Justice Department.

The two former Twitter staffers, Ali Alzabarah, a Saudi national and Ahmad Abouammo, a US citizen, used their access at the micro-blogging giant to gather sensitive and non-public information on dissidents of the Saudi regime, the Justice Department said in a criminal complaint.

The case, unsealed in San Francisco federal court, underscores allegations the Saudi government tries to control anti-regime voices abroad. It also recalls a move reportedly directed by the country’s controversial leader to weaponise online platforms against critics, CNN Business reported on Thursday.

Spying
A US citizen, used their access at the micro-blogging giant to gather sensitive and non-public information on dissidents of the Saudi regime. Pixabay

One of the two people is reportedly an associate of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman — who the CIA has concluded likely ordered the assassination of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul last year.

“The criminal complaint unsealed today alleges that Saudi agents mined Twitter’s internal systems for personal information about known Saudi critics and thousands of other Twitter users,” US Attorney David Anderson said in a statement.

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Another man, named Ahmed Almutairi, who is also from Saudi Arabia, allegedly acted as a go-between to the two Twitter staffers and the Saudi government, which according to the complaint rewarded the men with hundreds of thousands of dollars and, for one man, a luxury Hublot watch, the report added. (IANS)