Saturday December 15, 2018

Five Benefits of Honey and Lemon Drink that Can’t be Ignored

Lemon and honey mixture helps you lead a balanced and healthy lifestyle.

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Lemon and honey drink. Pixabay.
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  • Lemon and Honey drink helps you maintain a healthy lifestyle.
  • The mixture gives you the right amount of nutrients and removes toxins from the body.

The advise of drinking warm water mixed with lemon and honey has been given to all of us. But how many of us do really follow the advise? Very few. We tend to avoid natural remedies and seek for synthetic ways to improve our health and skin. But, this is one remedy which cannot be ignored. From physicians to gym trainers, everyone will give you a heads up to the healthy mix. All you need to do is, mix some warm water with half lemon and honey and wait for wonders to happen.

How To make the honey- lemon drink (low-calorie drink):

  •   Boil a cup of water and allow it to cool until it is just warm to touch.
  •   Add a teaspoonful of organic, unprocessed honey and stir well to dissolve.
  •   Squeeze the juice of half a lemon into the honey water, give it a stir and drink up.

Below are some benefits of Honey-Lemon drink:

  1. Boosts your immunity:

Lemon juice is a cocktail of all kinds of the body’s most essential nutrients. It has Vitamin C that help in fighting cold. Lemon is high in potassium as well, which stimulates nerve function, controls  blood pressure, helps in balancing pH Levels and reduces the overall acidity in the body. And, lemon juice’s mixture with honey cleanses the liver. This is one of the most amazing benefits of honey-lemon drink.

2. Helps in weight loss:

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Lemon juice mixed with honey helps you in losing weight. Pixabay.

Your health conscious friends would be the first ones to recommend you the healthy drink, as it prevents obesity. Since it cleanses the liver leading to body’s detoxification, your system’s metabolism rate gets boosted, and you start functioning better. The concoction is rich in pectin fiber, which helps in battling food cravings.

Also Read: Skin Benefits Of Coconut Oil: Beauty Tips using Coconut Oil

3. NO Acne! It promises you a clear and glowing skin:

If you’re dealing with an acne problem, then this is probably the best thing you could have.The anti bacterial properties of lemon and honey would do wonders to your skin.  The Vitamin C component reduces wrinkles and blemishes. Thus, a glass of this tasty and healthy drink, will in no time give you a clear skin.

4. Aids in food digestion:

Lemon
Lemon and honey mixture helps you with good digestion. Pixabay.

The honey & lemon drink helps the liver to produce bile, which is an acid required for digestion. Right digestion prevents constipation and heat burns.

5. Honey & Lemon Drink Boosts your energy early in the morning:

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The juice gives you energy to work throughout the day. Pixabay.

Benefits of honey & lemon drink: Lemon juice always freshens you up, but mixing it with honey will sustain your energy for a longer time. Honey is a food item providing lots of energy. Its composition of simple sugar like glucose and fructose will give you instant calories; therefore, giving you the power to work the whole day.

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by Megha Acharya of NewsGram.


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Women Hit Especially Hard In Congo’s Worst Ebola Outbreak

For the afflicted, the road to recovery is long and lonely.

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Ebola, WHO, UNICEF, congo, Uganda, women
Congolese health workers register people and take their temperatures before they are vaccinated against Ebola in the village of Mangina in North Kivu province of the Democratic Republic of Congo. VOA

The Democratic Republic of Congo is in the throes of its worst-ever Ebola outbreak, with more than 420 cases in the country’s volatile east, and a mortality rate of just under 60 percent. But this outbreak — the nation’s tenth known Ebola epidemic — is unusual because more than 60 percent of patients are women.

Among them is Baby Benedicte. Her short life has already been unimaginably difficult.

At one month old, she is underweight, at 2.9 kilograms. And she is alone. Her mother had Ebola, and died giving birth to her. She’s spent the last three weeks of her life in a plastic isolation cube, cut off from most human contact. She developed a fever at eight days old and was transferred to this hospital in Beni, a town of some half-million people in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

More than 400 people have been diagnosed with Ebola here since the beginning of August, and more than half of them have died in a nation the size of Western Europe that struggles with insecurity and a lack of the most basic infrastructure and services. That makes this the second-worst Ebola outbreak in history, after the hemorrhagic fever killed more than 11,000 people in West Africa between 2013 and 2016.

This is 10th outbreak to strike the vast country since 1976, when Ebola was first identified in Congo. And this particular outbreak is further complicated by a simmering civil conflict that has plagued this region for more than two decades.

Guido Cornale, UNICEF’s coordinator in the region, says the scope of this outbreak is clear.

“It has become the worst outbreak in Congo, this is not a mystery,” he said.

What is mysterious, however, is the demographics of this outbreak. This time, more than 60 percent of cases are women, says the government’s regional health coordinator, Ndjoloko Tambwe Bathe.

“All the analyses show that this epidemic is feminized. Figures like this are alarming. It’s true that the female cases are more numerous than the male cases,” he said.

Congo, Uganda, ebola, Women
Health workers walk with a boy suspected of having been infected with the Ebola virus, at an Ebola treatment center in Beni, near Congo’s border with Uganda. VOA

Bathe declined to predict when the outbreak might end, though international officials have said it may last another six months. Epidemiologists are still studying why this epidemic is so skewed toward women and children, Cornale said.

“So now we can only guess. And one of the guesses is that woman are the caretakers of sick people at home. So if a family member got sick, who is taking care of him or her? Normally, a woman,” he said.

Or a nurse. Many of those affected are health workers, who are on the front line of battling this epidemic. Nurse Guilaine Mulindwa Masika, spent 16 days in care after a patient transmitted the virus to her. She says it was the fight of her life.

“The pain was enormous, the pain was constant,” she said. “The headache, the diarrhea, the vomiting, and the weakness — it was very, very bad.”

Congo, Ebola, Women
Marie-Roseline Darnycka Belizaire, World Health Organization (WHO) Epidemiology Team Lead, talks to women as part of Ebola contact tracing, in Mangina, Democratic Republic of Congo. VOA

For the afflicted, the road to recovery is long and lonely. Masika and her cured colleagues face weeks of leave from work to ensure the risk of infection is gone. In the main hospital in the city of Beni, families who have recovered live together in a large white tent, kept four meters from human contact by a bright orange plastic cordon. They yell hello at their caretakers, who must don protective gear if they want to get any closer.

And for Baby Benedicte, who is tended to constantly by a nurse covered head to toe in protective gear, the future is uncertain. Medical workers aren’t entirely sure where her father is, or if he is going to come for her.

Also Read: Congo Start Trials For Drugs Against Ebola

She sleeps most of the day, the nurse says, untroubled by the goings-on around her. Meanwhile, the death toll rises. (VOA)