Tuesday May 21, 2019
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Bengaluru Hospital saves Pakistani heart patient

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Bengaluru: A complicated heart surgery was performed on a 39-year-old Pakistani heart patient at a private hospital here and saved him from a life-threatening situation, a hospital official said on Friday.

Jain Institute of Vascular Sciences (Jivas) director and vascular surgeon K.R. Suresh expressed the patient’s details in a statement today.

Though Anwar was initially treated in his native city (Karachi) for back and chest pain in 2008, he had a history of hypertension, jeopardizing his young life,

A CT scan, however, revealed Anwar’s heart had an artery that supplies blood to vital organs split into two, affecting the blood supply to other parts of the body.

He (Anwar) was given the option of going to the US or Bengaluru. He came to us on November 9 for treatment as his life was at stake, as the scan confirmed a spiral split in the blood supply, said Suresh.

The split involved both arteries supplying the intestines and kidneys were shrunken from lack of blood supply.

A team of doctors, including Vivekananda, Visnu and Sumanth Raj performed the surgery after providing an alternate route for supplying blood to the intestines and fix a stent graft to prevent blood leaking.

In the first stage, a bypass was made to intestines and liver with an artificial graft from left leg’s arteries. Anwar recovered well to have a stent graft inserted in a week through a small incision in the right groin, said Suresh.

Recovering from a life-saving surgery swiftly, Anwar is having a normal diet, taking long walks and raring to return home soon.

Jivas is part of the Bhagwan Mahaveer Jain Hospital here.

(Inputs from IANS)

(Picture Courtesy:-india.com)

 

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Do You Know What All Activities Your Smartwatch Can Sense? Read Here To Find Out!

Apps might alert users to typing habits that could lead to repetitive strain injury (RSI), or assess the onset of motor impairments such as those associated with Parkinson's disease.

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To reach this conclusion, Harrison and his team began their exploration of hand activity detection by recruiting 50 people to wear specially programmed smartwatches for almost 1,000 hours while going about their daily activities. Pixabay

Smartwatches, with a few tweaks, can detect a surprising number of things your hands are doing like helping your spouse with washing dishes, chopping vegetables or petting a dog, say researchers from Carnegie Mellon University.

By making a few changes to the smartwatch’s operating system, they were able to use its accelerometer to recognise hand motions and, in some cases, bio-acoustic sounds associated with 25 different hand activities at around 95 percent accuracy.

Those 25 activities (including typing on a keyboard, washing dishes, petting a dog, pouring from a pitcher or cutting with scissors) are just the beginning of what might be possible to detect, the researchers said.

“We envision smartwatches as a unique beachhead on the body for capturing rich, everyday activities,” said Chris Harrison, Assistant Professor in Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII) at Carnegie.

smartwatch
Sensing hand activity also lends itself to health-related apps — monitoring activities such as brushing teeth, washing hands or smoking a cigarette.
Pixabay

“A wide variety of apps could be made smarter and more context-sensitive if our devices knew the activity of our bodies and hands,” he added.

Just as smartphones now can block text messages while a user is driving, future devices that sense hand activity might learn not to interrupt someone while they are doing certain work with their hands.

Sensing hand activity also lends itself to health-related apps — monitoring activities such as brushing teeth, washing hands or smoking a cigarette.

“Hand-sensing also might be used by apps that provide feedback to users who are learning a new skill, such as playing a musical instrument, or undergoing physical rehabilitation,” the study noted.

Apps might alert users to typing habits that could lead to repetitive strain injury (RSI), or assess the onset of motor impairments such as those associated with Parkinson’s disease.

To reach this conclusion, Harrison and his team began their exploration of hand activity detection by recruiting 50 people to wear specially programmed smartwatches for almost 1,000 hours while going about their daily activities.

dog
Those 25 activities (including typing on a keyboard, washing dishes, petting a dog, pouring from a pitcher or cutting with scissors) are just the beginning of what might be possible to detect, the researchers said.
Pixabay

More than 80 hand activities were labeled in this way, providing a unique dataset.

For now, users must wear the smartwatch on their active arm, rather than the passive (non-dominant) arm where people typically wear wristwatches, for the system to work.

Also Read: Facebook Creating ‘Inequalities’ Through Political Advertisements

Future experiments will explore what events can be detected using the passive arm.

Harrison and HCII PhD student Gierad Laput presented the findings at “CHI 2019”, the Association for Computing Machinery’s conference on human factors in computing systems in Glasgow, Scotland. (IANS)