Saturday November 16, 2019
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Bengaluru Hospital saves Pakistani heart patient

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Bengaluru: A complicated heart surgery was performed on a 39-year-old Pakistani heart patient at a private hospital here and saved him from a life-threatening situation, a hospital official said on Friday.

Jain Institute of Vascular Sciences (Jivas) director and vascular surgeon K.R. Suresh expressed the patient’s details in a statement today.

Though Anwar was initially treated in his native city (Karachi) for back and chest pain in 2008, he had a history of hypertension, jeopardizing his young life,

A CT scan, however, revealed Anwar’s heart had an artery that supplies blood to vital organs split into two, affecting the blood supply to other parts of the body.

He (Anwar) was given the option of going to the US or Bengaluru. He came to us on November 9 for treatment as his life was at stake, as the scan confirmed a spiral split in the blood supply, said Suresh.

The split involved both arteries supplying the intestines and kidneys were shrunken from lack of blood supply.

A team of doctors, including Vivekananda, Visnu and Sumanth Raj performed the surgery after providing an alternate route for supplying blood to the intestines and fix a stent graft to prevent blood leaking.

In the first stage, a bypass was made to intestines and liver with an artificial graft from left leg’s arteries. Anwar recovered well to have a stent graft inserted in a week through a small incision in the right groin, said Suresh.

Recovering from a life-saving surgery swiftly, Anwar is having a normal diet, taking long walks and raring to return home soon.

Jivas is part of the Bhagwan Mahaveer Jain Hospital here.

(Inputs from IANS)

(Picture Courtesy:-india.com)

 

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Microorganisms Living In The Gut May Alter The Ageing Process

A new study says that the microorganisms found living in the gut may alter ageing process

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Microorganisms
Researchers have found that microorganisms living in the gut may alter the ageing process. Pixabay

Researchers have found that microorganisms living in the gut may alter the ageing process, which could lead to the development of food-based treatment to slow it down.

All living organisms, including human beings, coexist with a myriad of microbial species living in and on them, and research conducted over the last 20 years has established their important role in nutrition, physiology, metabolism and behaviour.

“We’ve found that microbes collected from an old mouse have the capacity to support neural growth in a younger mouse,” said study researcher Sven Pettersson from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

“This is a surprising and very interesting observation, especially since we can mimic the neuro-stimulatory effect by using butyrate alone,” Pettersson added.

Using mice, the research team transplanted gut microbes from old mice (24 months old) into young, germ-free mice (six weeks old).

After eight weeks, the young mice had increased intestinal growth and production of neurons in the brain, known as neurogenesis.

The team showed that the increased neurogenesis was due to an enrichment of gut microbes that produce a specific short chain fatty acid, called butyrate.

Butyrate is produced through microbial fermentation of dietary fibres in the lower intestinal tract and stimulates production of a pro-longevity hormone called FGF21, which plays an important role in regulating the body’s energy and metabolism.

Microorganisms, mice
Using mice, the research team transplanted gut microorganisms from old mice into young, germ-free mice. Pixabay

As we age, butyrate production is reduced.

The researchers then showed that giving butyrate on its own to the young germ-free mice had the same adult neurogenesis effects.

“These results will lead us to explore whether butyrate might support repair and rebuilding in situations like stroke, spinal damage and to attenuate accelerated ageing and cognitive decline,” Pettersson said.

The team also explored the effects of gut microbe transplants from old to young mice on the functions of the digestive system.

With age, the viability of small intestinal cells is reduced, and this is associated with reduced mucus production that make intestinal cells more vulnerable to damage and cell death.

However, the addition of butyrate helps to better regulate the intestinal barrier function and reduce the risk of inflammation.

Also Read- Syska Launches An Anti-Bacterial LED Bulb

The team found that mice receiving microbes from the old donor gained increases in length and width of the intestinal villi – the wall of the small intestine. In addition, both the small intestine and colon were longer in the old mice than the young germ-free mice.

The discovery shows that gut microbes can compensate and support an ageing body through positive stimulation. (IANS)