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Big-sized rats claim lives daily in Peshawar, Pakistan

Peshawar is grappling with mice infestation

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https://youtu.be/q2rfiIEr-9M

Peshawar, Pakistan: “When I woke up I saw a big rat run from the room,” said Qari Khalid, whose eight-month-old son died by a rat bite on his face and nose in February this year in 2016.

Ranked among the top 10 most polluted cities in the world by a World Health Organization (WHO) 2015 study, Peshawar in northwest Pakistan continues to be dominated by a landscape of waste heaps and open dumps. Strings of complaints from residents pushed the district administration earlier in April to announce a ‘rat-killing bounty’ of Rs.25 to Rs 300 in various parts of the city. A separate municipal body taking care of eliminating the vermin infection is currently operating in the area.

According to inputs from the Lady Reading Hospital, a total of 380 cases were reported in the first half of May itself and the figure continues to rise each day. As bulks of garbage occupy surroundings, residents are grappled with fear of these unusually “bigger-sized” rats claiming several lives daily.

Report prepared by Maariyah Siddiquee

 

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WHO Claims Measles Epidemic in Madagascar Takes Hundreds Of Lives

The epidemic is blamed on a low immunization rate for measles across the island nation over a period of many years, according to WHO spokesman Tarik Jasarevic.

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A Malagasy child receives a vaccination at a makeshift village clinic in Antanetikely, Madagascar. VOA

The World Health Organization says that an epidemic of measles in Madagascar has caused more than 900 deaths.

According to WHO figures, there have been more than 68,000 cases of the disease in which 553 deaths were confirmed and another 373 suspected from measles since the outbreak began in September.

Those most at risk are infants from nine to 11 months old.

disease
The World Health Organization says that an epidemic of measles in Madagascar has caused more than 900 deaths. Pixabay

The epidemic is blamed on a low immunization rate for measles across the island nation over a period of many years, according to WHO spokesman Tarik Jasarevic. The vaccination rate is estimated to be less than 60 percent, according to figures from WHO and UNICEF figures, he said.
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Madagascar has launched a nationwide campaign to try to bring the outbreak under control, through mass vaccination campaigns and surveillance. (VOA)