Wednesday December 19, 2018

Blocking a gene may prevent heart diseases: Study

0
//
picture from- www.bioethics.com
Republish
Reprint

Toronto: Blocking the expression of a gene may help prevent illnesses linked to excessive fat in blood such as cardiovascular and pancreatic diseases, says a new study. dna-163466_640

The researchers found that shutting down the expression of this gene decreases in blood the concentration of triglycerides – lipids that come from fats carried by our food or produced by our bodies – even in various severe forms of hypertriglyceridemia.

Higher levels of triglycerides in blood or hypertriglyceridemia is often associated with frequent health issues, such as obesity or diabetes.

The gene in question codes for the apoC-III protein.

“Our study suggests that the protein apoC-III plays a key role in the management of triglycerides. Triglycerides, like cholesterol, are lipids,” said first author of the study Daniel Gaudet from University of Montreal in Canada.

“Depending on the cause, the accumulation of triglycerides in blood is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and pancreatic illnesses, and other complications,” Gaudet noted.

“Our conclusions are promising in terms of the prevention of the risk associated with the accumulation of fat in blood,” he pointed out.

The research was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

(IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Weight Lifting Proven Better Than Walking And Cycling To Keep Heart Diseases At Bay

For the study, the researchers included 4,086 adults aged 21 to 44 or over 45

0
Weight Lifting
Weightlifting better than walking and cycling for heart: Study. Pixabay

While it is well known that physical activities promote heart health, a new study suggests that weightlifting, rather than walking and cycling, can better help keep heart diseases at bay.

The study showed that engaging in both static activities such as strength training and dynamic activities like walking and cycling was associated with 30 to 70 per cent lower rates of cardiovascular disease risk factors.

But, the associations were strongest for strength training among youth than older adults.

“Both strength training and aerobic activity appeared to be heart healthy, even in small amounts, at the population level,” said Maia P. Smith, Assistant Professor at St. George’s University in Grenada.

“However, static activity appeared more beneficial than dynamic,” Smith added.

Lift Weights
Lift Weights. Pixabay

Further, the researchers suggested that clinicians should counsel patients, especially the elderly, to exercise regardless of activity types as patients who did both types of physical activity fared better than patients who simply increased the level of one type of activity.

“The important thing is to make sure they are engaging in physical activity,” Smith said.

The findings were presented at the ACC Latin America Conference 2018 in Peru.

Also Read- Xiaomi Drops Down Smartphone Prices in India

For the study, the researchers included 4,086 adults aged 21 to 44 or over 45.

The team analysed cardiovascular risk factors, such as high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes and high cholesterol, as a function of self-reported static and/or dynamic activity. (IANS)