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Bobby Jindal criticizes Iran nuclear deal

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Washington, Louisiana’s Indian-American governor Bobby Jindal has joined other 2016 Republican presidential contenders in decrying the historic nuclear deal with Iran saying it doesn’t go far enough.

Bobby_Jindal_CPAC_2013_BJindal, who joined his rivals in an interview with PBS, gave three reasons for his opposition.

First, Iran will be allowed to hold onto “thousands of centrifuges,” which Jindal said will allow the country to maintain uranium enrichment capacity.

Second, Iranian leaders aren’t going to be required to sever ties with militant anti-Israel groups such as Hamas and Hezbollah, he said.

Third, inspectors won’t be allowed free rein to inspect nuclear sites, even though Jindal said President Barack Obama “said we will get anywhere, anytime inspections.”

“I worry under this president’s deal we could end up with a nuclear arms race in the Middle East,” Jindal said.

Jindal hoped that Democratic presidential front runner Hillary “Clinton, who’s been the architect of this president’s foreign policy will come out and oppose this deal and say it is time for America to stand with Israel.”

“There is still time for America to come out and say we will not allow Iran to become a nuclear power.”

Jindal went on to say that if he is elected president, he would impose tougher sanctions on Iran.

Asked about his insistence on people to stop using “hyphenated” terms such as Indian-Americans, Jindal returned to familiar rhetoric about how he thinks immigrants should embrace US values and learn English.

“The great thing about America is, we’re a wonderful melting pot,” he said. “Folks can be proud of their heritage. But I think the hyphenations, the divisions are keeping us apart,” he said.

“I think its common sense to say, if you want to come here, you should want to be an American. Otherwise, why are you coming here?

“We can still embrace our Italian heritage or our old country heritages, but we should be Americans. Stop the hyphenated Americans,” Jindal said.

Meanwhile, according to a report in the Washington Examiner, Jindal raised nearly $579,000 in his first week as a presidential candidate, but has another $8.6 million in his corner thanks to supportive outside groups.

Believe again, the super PAC supporting Jindal’s presidential bid, raised $3.7 million since launching in January. An additional almost $4 million was raised by America Next, a nonprofit backing Jindal, with another $1 million flowing to American Future Project.

Jindal, 44, is lagging in the polls, registering at 1.4 percent nationally among Republican primary voters, according to the RealClearPolitics average, placing him far out of contention to qualify for the first televised debate, set for Aug 6 in Cleveland.

(IANS)

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Iran Alleges Twitter of Blocking Legitimate Accounts

Twitter specifically said it had suspended 284 accounts with ties to Iran for "coordinated manipulation

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Twitter's new update brings 'data saver' feature for iOS. Pixabay

Iran appers to be unhappy with the way Twitter is cracking down on fake accounts as the country’s Foreign Minister has alleged that the microblogging site is shutting down accounts of “real” Iranians while letting anti-government bots to thrive.

Addressing Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif on Sunday said that the accounts of “real” Iranians blocked by Twitter include those of some TV presenters and students, CNET reported.

“Hello @Jack. Twitter has shuttered accounts of real Iranians, (including) TV presenters & students, for supposedly being part of an ‘influence op,'” Zarif wrote in a tweet.

“How about looking at actual bots in Tirana used to prop up ‘regime change’ propaganda spewed out of DC? #YouAreBots,” he went on to say in the same tweet, referencing Albania’s capital.

Twitter
Twitter on a smartphone device. Pixabay

Facebook and Twitter came under the radar of investigators for their alleged failure to prevent spread of divisive news stories on their platforms in the lead up to the US presidential election in 2016.

The social media giants last month announced they had collectively removed hundreds of inauthentic pages, groups and accounts linked to disinformation campaigns.

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Twitter specifically said it had suspended 284 accounts with ties to Iran for “coordinated manipulation”, the CNET report said. (IANS)

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