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Bobby Jindal criticizes Iran nuclear deal

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Washington, Louisiana’s Indian-American governor Bobby Jindal has joined other 2016 Republican presidential contenders in decrying the historic nuclear deal with Iran saying it doesn’t go far enough.

Bobby_Jindal_CPAC_2013_BJindal, who joined his rivals in an interview with PBS, gave three reasons for his opposition.

First, Iran will be allowed to hold onto “thousands of centrifuges,” which Jindal said will allow the country to maintain uranium enrichment capacity.

Second, Iranian leaders aren’t going to be required to sever ties with militant anti-Israel groups such as Hamas and Hezbollah, he said.

Third, inspectors won’t be allowed free rein to inspect nuclear sites, even though Jindal said President Barack Obama “said we will get anywhere, anytime inspections.”

“I worry under this president’s deal we could end up with a nuclear arms race in the Middle East,” Jindal said.

Jindal hoped that Democratic presidential front runner Hillary “Clinton, who’s been the architect of this president’s foreign policy will come out and oppose this deal and say it is time for America to stand with Israel.”

“There is still time for America to come out and say we will not allow Iran to become a nuclear power.”

Jindal went on to say that if he is elected president, he would impose tougher sanctions on Iran.

Asked about his insistence on people to stop using “hyphenated” terms such as Indian-Americans, Jindal returned to familiar rhetoric about how he thinks immigrants should embrace US values and learn English.

“The great thing about America is, we’re a wonderful melting pot,” he said. “Folks can be proud of their heritage. But I think the hyphenations, the divisions are keeping us apart,” he said.

“I think its common sense to say, if you want to come here, you should want to be an American. Otherwise, why are you coming here?

“We can still embrace our Italian heritage or our old country heritages, but we should be Americans. Stop the hyphenated Americans,” Jindal said.

Meanwhile, according to a report in the Washington Examiner, Jindal raised nearly $579,000 in his first week as a presidential candidate, but has another $8.6 million in his corner thanks to supportive outside groups.

Believe again, the super PAC supporting Jindal’s presidential bid, raised $3.7 million since launching in January. An additional almost $4 million was raised by America Next, a nonprofit backing Jindal, with another $1 million flowing to American Future Project.

Jindal, 44, is lagging in the polls, registering at 1.4 percent nationally among Republican primary voters, according to the RealClearPolitics average, placing him far out of contention to qualify for the first televised debate, set for Aug 6 in Cleveland.

(IANS)

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Cybercrimes cost businesses $600 billion globally: McAfee report

Cybercrime losses are greater in richer countries; however, the countries with the greatest losses are mid-tier nations that are digitised but not yet fully capable of cybersecurity, the report noted.

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Russia, North Korea and Iran are the most active in hacking financial institutions, while China is the most active in cyber espionage.
Russia, North Korea and Iran are the most active in hacking financial institutions, while China is the most active in cyber espionage. Wikimedia Commons

Cybercrimes have cost businesses close to $600 billion globally — or 0.8% the global GDP — which is up from $445 billion reported three years back, a report said on Thursday.

The report by the global cybersecurity firm McAfee, prepared along with the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), said that over the last three years, cybercriminals have quickly adopted new technologies to ease the process of engaging in cybercrimes.

“Ransomware-as-a-Service Cloud providers efficiently scale attacks to target millions of systems, and attacks are automated to require minimal human involvement,” Steve Grobman, Chief Technology Officer for McAfee, said in a statement.

Also Read: Indian companies more prone to cyber attacks

“Add to these factors cryptocurrencies that ease rapid monetisation, while minimising the risk of arrest, and you must conclude that the $600 billion cybercrime figure reflects the extent to which our technological accomplishments have transformed the criminal economy as dramatically as they have every other portion of our economy,” he added.
The report, titled “Economic Impact of Cybercrime — No Slowing Down”, said that banks remain the favourite target for cybercriminals.

McAfee, Inc. is an American global computer security software company.
McAfee, Inc. is an American global computer security software company. Wikimedia Commons

Russia, North Korea and Iran are the most active in hacking financial institutions, while China is the most active in cyber espionage.

“Our research bore out the fact that Russia is the leader in cybercrime, reflecting the skill of its hacker community and its disdain for Western law enforcement,” said James Lewis, Senior Vice President at CSIS.

“North Korea is second in line, as the nation uses cryptocurrency theft to help fund its regime, and we’re now seeing an expanding number of cybercrime centres, including not only North Korea but also Brazil, India and Vietnam,” Lewis added.

Cybercrime losses are greater in richer countries; however, the countries with the greatest losses are mid-tier nations that are digitised but not yet fully capable of cybersecurity, the report noted. (IANS)

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