Wednesday October 23, 2019
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Books for the weekend

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New Delhi: Book lovers prep up your weekend as we bring you some exciting good reads from various genres. These books are sure to make a worthy read on that lazy Sunday afternoon.

Meet Bant Singh, an agrarian labourer with indomitable spirit despite being physically disabled; Mohammed Aamir Khan, who refuses to be defeated despite being framed as a terrorist and being jailed for 14 years; an IAS officer explains complex ideas of Indian philosophy in simple and accessible language; and finally, tips from a journalist on how to invest money and save for future.

There’s much the bookshelf has for you this weekend. Take a look:

1. Book: The Ballad of Bant Singh; Author: Nirupama Dutt; Publisher: Speaking Tiger; Pages: 213; Price: Rs. 250

The book relates the life story of Bant Singh the protagonist and his tales of courage. On the unfortunate evening of January 5, 2006, Bant Singh, a Dalit agrarian labourer and activist in Punjab’s Jhabar village, was ambushed and brutally beaten up by upper-caste Jat men armed with iron rods and axes.

He then had to fight for justice for his minor daughter, who was gang-raped. He lost both his arm and a leg while fighting against the Jat men. But this incident could not demolish his spirit and continues to fight for equality and dignity, inspiring others with his revolutionary songs.

2. Book: Framed as a Terrorist; Author: Mohammad Aamir Khan with Nandita Haksar; Publisher: Speaking Tiger; Pages: 234; Price: Rs. 250
In 1998, an ordinary young man was kidnapped by the police from the by-lanes of old Delhi and accused of being a terrorist. The man was released after serving 14 years in jail – when proven innocent.

Based on the true story of the author, Mohammad Aamir Khan, the book is a tale of phenomenal humanity, perseverance, and courage in the face of extreme injustice. Despite facing torture and solitary confinement, the author remains committed to the secular and democratic values that he grew up with.

3. Book: Chaturvedi Badrinath – Unity of Life and Other Essays; Edited by Tulsi Badrinath; Publisher: Oxford; Pages: 158; Price: Rs. 450
The latest book edited by Tulsi Badrinath is a compilation of essays written by her father Chaturvedi Badrinath. The book takes a reader into Badrinath’s approach towards life. An IAS officer for 31 years, he delivered lectures on the concept of dharma and its application in modern times.

Ranging over perceptions of the self and the other; different ways of ordering society in Jainism, Islam and Christianity; the paradox of sex; the roots of violence and the quest for truth and peace – Badrinath’s essays gained wide acclaim and popularity.

4. Book: The Money Book; Author: Vivek Law; Publisher: Rupa; Pages: 194; Price: Rs. 395
Planning to invest money in starting a new business? Want your money to multiply fast? Or save some earnings that would secure future post-retirement? Well, here is the answer to queries related to money and investment.

Using relatable examples, the author simplifies the process of savings and investing by bringing the best possible ways to multiply money. Decoding terms like mutual funds, equities, and life insurance, Vivek Law shows that there is no need to toil throughout life to have a secure and comfortable lifestyle.(IANS)

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One Up Library Brings Children Closer To Books

Bringing children back to books, the One Up way

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One Up Library in Vasant Vihar. IANS
One Up Library in Vasant Vihar promoting reading habits among children. IANS

With walls painted pearl white and bright mats covering the floor, it looks like a fancy showroom in an upmarket neighbourhood. But don’t get mistaken — it’s a library. And that too for children.

The One Up library in Vasant Vihar is like an oasis in the digital desert with 1-14 years old as members. It’s a rarity to find a neighbourhood library as today’s children are mostly engaged in online passions, having little time for reading books.

Dalbir Kaur, founder of One Up, believes in the old school way of making children aware. Started in Amritsar in 2011 as the Golden City’s first modern library, One Up travelled to Delhi in 2017.

Dalbir believes the 21st-century children need spaces beyond schools that specifically focus on critical reading and thinking; promoting curiosity, collaboration & conversations, and community-building.

“The conventional libraries could not stand the effect of time, especially when everything is available online. But it’s important that children visit libraries to explore literature, develop their reading tastes,” she told IANS.

Dalbir said to draw teenagers towards books and promote less usage of technology, a revolutionary change was required in the way libraries looked and felt. She brought the concept of active reading, where children are guided by trained helpers who themselves read a lot.

“It’s important to have attractive interiors with an active librarian. The librarian or the attendants must be active and knowledgeable about the books and should be avid readers themselves,” Dalbir said.

Bringing children back to books
Motivating children to read books and cultivating reading habits amongst children in One Up library. Pixabay

Since the readers are children, Dalbir herself goes through every book that is to be added to the library to remove all the chances of inappropriate content. Her team also organises weekly activities, like ‘read-out-loud’, ‘draw what you read’, interaction with authors and quizzes after a reader finishes his/her book. All of this is conducted on the first floor of the building, which is now full of drawings and charts created by readers as part of their activity.

The initiative has gained popularity as the library now has over 200 children as members and the number is rising every day. Some members even come from Noida and Gurugram to read books — just for an hour or two.

The positive changes have also begun to flow as Dalbir has been approached by several educational institutions to curate their libraries and train their teachers. By now she has helped over 20 schools to curate their libraries and train librarians.

Also Read: Google Assistant Soon be Able to Read Messages from Whatsapp, Slack and Telegram

Dalbir does not charge anything from a school for curating a library. She holds workshops for teachers and librarians, advice on steps to innovate and initiating non-readers.

She has now launched an award, which will attract nationwide entries, for excellence in best practices in a nurturing learning environment. Entries could be sent till September 5. (IANS)