Thursday July 19, 2018
Home India Books that ta...

Books that talk of Legends, Emotions, Fandom and a Soldier’s Autobiography: Here is a List!

0
//
102
Books, Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

New Delhi, May 5, 2017: Embark on a journey with a real estate magnate living in the two worlds of reality and myth that blend as he seeks the answer to his existence; glance through different emotions and thoughts that are relatable to everyone. Also, know how some kinds of engagement with fans succeed and some backfire; read a highly motivating autobiography of a soldier who can inspire youth who dare to dream big.

That’s what IANS bookshelf has on offer this weekend. Read on!

1. Book: The Legend of Karna; Author: Karan Vir; Publisher: Frog Books; Pages: 227; Price: 299

Karan vir Oberoi, a real-estate magnate living in New York, has recurrent dreams of someone who looks like an ancient warrior clad in golden armour and wearing golden earrings. He feels a deep bond with the warrior but the dreams remain a mystery to him. After miraculously surviving an assassination attempt, Oberoi is determined to seek answers. His quest for truth leads him back to his homeland, India, where his true destiny awaits him.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

Karna, the legendary hero from the Mahabharata, is considered one of the most valiant and generous kings of his era. He defied social customs and traditions to achieve immortal glory by his virtues and skills. He became a king and trusted friend of Duroyadhana — the crown prince of Hastinapur.

Embark on a journey with Oberoi as the two worlds blend and as he seeks the answer to his existence. Will history repeat itself or will Oberoi choose to venture into uncharted territory? Unravel the mystery. Read the legend!

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

2. Book: Seeds of Pomegranate; Authors: Irfan Nabi and Nilosree; Publisher: Half Baked Beans; Pages: 48; Price: 150

“Seeds of Pomegranate” very intriguingly brings across writings about dashes of love, half-promises and memories laced with infatuation, fleeting moments of desire and incompleteness.

The trails of these are thought to be long-entombed by the sand clock: A glance through the blurred maze of delirium. Nameless, yet familiar.

With around 50 small writings juxtaposed with pictures about simple things in life, the book offers to the readers a nice way to pass time. It also touches the complex thoughts and ideas running through the mind of an individual, but the narration is extraordinarily simple and readable.

3. Book: Super Fandom; Author: Zoe Fraade Blanar and Aaron M. Glazer; Publisher: Hachette; Pages: 318; Price: 499

Fans create, they engage, they discuss. From comics to clothing, the boundaries between fans and creators are blurring. This is the new fandom-based economy: A convergence of brand owner and brand consumer. Fan pressures hold more clout than ever before as audiences demand a say in shaping the future of the things they love.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

In “Super Fandom”, Blanar and Glazer explain this new era of symbiosis. For producers, it can mean a golden opportunity: Brands such as Polaroid and Surge, preserved by the passion of a handful of nostalgic fans, can now count on an articulate, creative, and, above all, loyal audience. Yet, the new economy has its own risks. It’s also easier than ever for companies to lose their audience’s trust, as Valve did when it tried to introduce a paid mode system for its Skyrim video game.

Examining key cases that span a wide range of consumer markets, the writers explain why some kinds of engagement with fans succeed and some backfire. Throughout, the authors delve into the history, sociology and psychology of fandom.

4. Book: Broken Crayons Can Still Colour; Author: Rakesh Walia; Publisher: Notion Press; Pages: 143; Price: 199

Captain Rakesh Walia’s autobiography “Broken Crayons Can Still Colour” is a highly motivating book and a must-read for youth who dare to dream big. An extremely absorbing and gripping narrative of his personal life, the book is difficult to put down once you start reading it.

Captain, as he is fondly called, has an amazing personality and a pleasant demeanour with no trace of his traumatic childhood experiences.

What makes the difference betweem success and failure? Is it one’s individual temperatment, the DNA or mere focus?

This book will answer all your questions. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

“A Suitable Girl”: Most Awaited Novel By Vikram Seth, Finally Published

Seth suffered from writer's block after his break-up

0
"A Suitable Girl": Most Awaited Novel By Vikram Seth, Finally Published, flickr

Hardly has any novel been awaited with as much curiosity and anticipation in recent times as Vikram Seth’s sequel to the monumental “A Suitable Boy” (1993). Five years on, since he was first expected to deliver the manuscript, the novel is still to see the light of the day. But what seems like a saga of missed deadlines can very well — far from our eyes — be a masterpiece in the making.

“The more I talk of her, the more shy she becomes,” Seth had told this correspondent in 2015 about “A Suitable Girl”, the novel-in-waiting.

Seth, as his literary agent David Godwin puts it, has been known to take his time with his books. The prolonged delay, however, was not acceptable to Hamish Hamilton (an imprint of Penguin Random House) and he was asked to return an advance payment of $1.7 million when the deal was called off. Weidenfeld and Nicolson, an imprint of the British publisher Orion, then acquired the novel — and it was scheduled to release in 2016.

But a flying bird — a friend and confidant of the writer — says that he is now giving the “final touch” to the novel and that one can expect “the big announcement” soon.

Seth released a collection of poems titled “Summer Requiem” in the meanwhile. In the collection, he traces the immutable shiftings of the seasons, the relentless rhythms of a great world that both “gifts and harms”. Composed as they were while he was (which he still is) writing the sequel, several poems in the offering open doors to his mind, or perhaps they may be preludes to the larger narrative that he is weaving.

“I have so carefully mapped/the corners of my mind/that I am forever waking/in a lost country,” he writes in the opening poem. Interestingly, Seth’s companion to “A Suitable Boy” will be a jump sequel — the characters have travelled from the 1950s and it will be very much a novel set in somewhat the present times.

novels By Vikram Seth
novels By Vikram Seth, flickr

In its title poem, he mourns that the “liberated generation lives a restrained youth,” and then adds: “I must forsake attachment”. On another occasion in the book, readers find him lamenting over “the peaceful love” that the narrator has “never found”. In another short poem “Late Light” he writes: “Outside the great world’s gifts and harms/ There must be somewhere I can go/To rest within a lover’s arm/At ease with the impending snow”.

Reportedly, Seth suffered from writer’s block after his break-up with French violinist Phillippe Honor but that was a long time ago and was reflected in “An Equal Music”. He has moved on or has he not?

Nonetheless, it has been about five years since “A Suitable Girl” was first expected to hit the stands but the wait is surely worth it. As writer-politician Shashi Tharoor says about his good friend’s technique — that “Vikram Seth draws an entire roadmap of his novel, planning every minute element in great detail” — the sequel, thanks to all the anticipation and the pressure on the writer, may actually be a masterpiece in the making, as sublime as its counterpart and yet set in the time of its readers.

Vikram Seth is a recipient of the Padma Shri, Sahitya Akademi Award, and among several other prestigious honours, the Pravasi Bharatiya Samman. He has been widely translated and is among leading novelists on the global stage. He has published three novels — “The Golden Gate” (1986), “A Suitable Boy” (1993) and “An Equal Music” (1999) — along with several collections of poetry such as “Mappings” and “All You Who Sleep Tonight”.

Also read: Here is all the reason for Bookworms to look ahead for the upcoming year: A List of the Best Stories and Novels in 2017!

Seth — an openly gay man — is also one of the prominent faces of the campaign against Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code that criminalises homosexuality. (IANS)