Sunday December 8, 2019
Home Uncategorized Boxing Yoga i...

Boxing Yoga is the new fitness mantra

0
//
Image Courtesy: theresident.wpms.greatbritishlife.co.uk

By Zara Stone

Boxers may be known for their toughness, but there is one thing many fear: yoga. “They think it’s all bendy women in Lycra,” says Martine Hamers, who teaches a “boxing yoga” class in San Francisco.

By blending traditional yoga asanas, or poses, with boxing drills, this new fitness iteration hopes to attract a more macho audience, one that would benefit from some extra stretching and core building — as well as a little zen in the ring.

In Hamers’ class, you’ll find exercises familiar to practitioners of both sports. Punching, deep breathing, sun salutations that morph into fighting poses with fists clenched as you jab right, swing left. Planks are performed balanced on knuckles, with emphasis placed on elongating the calf muscles, which get shortened in the southpaw stance. Some people wear boxing gloves to class, but wraps or bare hands are more common, as they help build wrist stability.

While the melding of the two practices might sound unnatural, the sequencing flows rather seamlessly. And classes cater to all levels — desk jockeys, for example, will benefit from the shoulder opening drills, which help straighten backs rounded from typing all day. For her part, Hamers, 31, stays away from Sanskrit, explaining that terms like “savasana” and “pranayama” can be off-putting to someone who is just learning downward dog.

Boxing yoga began in England in 2011 as a collaboration between boxing trainer Matt Garcia and fitness coach and former ballerina Kajza Ekberg. After Garcia opened a north London boutique boxing gym, he began looking for ways to improve his boxers’ flexibility and to reduce injury. With the help of Ekberg, the two selected yoga poses that would strengthen and lengthen the body. Their slogan: “Yoga for Tough Guys.”

With 21 studios across England and one in Berlin, demand for classes was so high that Garcia and Ekberg established the Boxing Yoga Coaches Association last year. There are now 100 trained coaches teaching classes in Israel, Ireland, the Netherlands and the U.S. And the market potential is huge: In the U.S. alone, 21 million people practice yoga regularly, creating close to a $9 billion industry.

There has been some resistance from the yoga community, with concerns that boxing clashes with the peaceful ethos yoga is built on. Some who’ve taken a class complain that the “boxing” is more gimmick than substance. Regardless, yoga offers a lesson useful for any athlete, whether a fighter or a dancer, and that is mindfulness. As yoga pioneer Daniel Lacerda, aka Mr. Yoga, says, “You cannot always control what goes on outside. But you can always control what goes on inside.”

Source: http://www.ozy.com

Next Story

Meditation Can Help You To Become Less Error Prone

The research, published in the journal Brain Sciences, tested how open monitoring meditation or, meditation that focuses awareness on feelings, thoughts or sensations as they unfold in one's mind and body

0
Meditation
Meditation helps in bringing the entire thought process to one point and relax, it clears our vision and fortunately while preparing for meditation we try to settle our physical, emotional and mental status. Pixabay

Researchers have found that Meditation could help you to become less error prone. According to the health experts here, meditation also helps in rejuvenating the mind, mental well being, better concentration power along with improved memory.

Practically stress and unwanted tension are some of the major reasons of short term forgetfulness and unfocused behaviour, the experts added.

Manish Gupta, Senior Consultant, Department of Neurology at Jaypee Hospital, Noida, said that meditation helps in rejuvenating the mind and gives relief from stress.

“Hence up to some extent it is helpful in making a person deal things with more patience and quiet mind. It also entirely depends upon the types of meditation one is doing, like sitting and following certain breathing exercise pattern to calm the mind, focusing on one point for a long time with quite mind,” Gupta told IANS.

“As per techniques, these activities definitely help in making a person more focused. Undoubtedly a calm mind can do things better than a mind full of mess,” Gupta said.

The research, published in the journal Brain Sciences, tested how open monitoring meditation or, meditation that focuses awareness on feelings, thoughts or sensations as they unfold in one’s mind and body — altered brain activity in a way that suggests increased error recognition.

They found that 20 minutes of meditation can enhance the brain’s ability to detect and pay attention to mistakes.

It makes people feel more confident in what mindfulness meditation might really be capable of for performance and daily functioning right there in the moment, the study said.

Meditation
Researchers have found that Meditation could help you to become less error prone. According to the health experts here, meditation also helps in rejuvenating the mind, mental well being, better concentration power along with improved memory. Pixabay

According to Pallavi Joshi, Clinical Psychologist at Sri Balaji Action Medical Institute, New Delhi, traditionally meditation has always been suggested to be added in the daily routine so as to reduce regular mental problems.

“As per today’s lifestyle time has come on fast pace, a single mind has to deal with a number of things in a single time, hence being forgetful, making silly mistakes frequently is nothing new,” Joshi told IANS.

ALSO READ: Microsoft Mobile Apps to Take Mobile Productivity on Next Level

“Meditation helps in bringing the entire thought process to one point and relax, it clears our vision and fortunately while preparing for meditation we try to settle our physical, emotional and mental status which culminates in not only good meditation, but additional effectiveness at the level of balanced emotional and mental well being, better concentration power, improved memory, lesser forgetfulness,” she explained. (IANS)