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Britain’s most hated man Anjem Choudary goes to Jail for supporting ISIS

The moniker, the "most hated man." was given by Britain's tabloid newspapers.Choudary, a former lawyer, has avoided prosecution for decades, as there was no proof he actually incited violence

Anjem Choudary, a British Muslim social and political activist and spokesman for Islamist group, Islam4UK, speaks following prayers at the Central London Mosque in Regent's Park, London, April 3, 2015 (VOA)

Sept 07, 2016: The most hated man as called by Britain has been jailed for 5 1/2 years since he urged support for ISIS.

Anjem Choudhary has been  the most hated man and he has always been a controversial person. Choudary was sentenced at the Old Bailey in London after his conviction in July of urging Muslims to support Isis in a series of talks posted on YouTube. He was convicted alongside his acolyte Mohammed Rahman, 33, who was also sentenced to five years and six months in prison. Choudary’s supporters in the public gallery shouted “Allahu Akbar” (God is greatest) as the judge finished sentencing.His supporters in the public gallery shouted “Allahu Akhbar” as he was led out of the courtroom after the sentencing. Counting time served in custody, he could be out by early 2019.

Choudary and Mohammed Mizanur Rahman, 33, were found guilty on July 28 of inviting support for the Islamic State between June 29, 2014, and March 6, 2015. Rahman received the same sentence after the four-week trial.

Justice Timothy Holroyde said”You are both mature men and intelligent men who knew throughout exactly what you were doing. You are both fluent and persuasive speakers,” And also called Rahman a “hothead” and Choudary more “calculating” and more experienced.

Sue Hemming, head of counter-terrorism at the Crown Prosecution Service”Those who invite others to support such organizations will be prosecuted and jailed for their crimes.”

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The moniker, the “most hated man.” was given by  Britain’s tabloid newspapers.Choudary, a former lawyer, has avoided prosecution for decades, as there was no proof he actually incited violence.

Cmdr. Dean Haydon of the Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command, told CNN. after the conviction “These men have stayed just within the law for many years,” But there is no one within the counter-terrorism world that has any doubts of the influence that they have had, the hate they have spread and the people that they have encouraged to join terrorist organizations.”

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Choudary told CNN in 2014: “I don’t pose a threat to anyone in this country. I pose an ideological or political threat, definitely.”

Police had enough evidence to arrest Choudary on Aug. 5, 2015 when they discovered material online in which he praised the Islamic State regime and leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in 2014. (VOA)

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Facebook, Twitter Urged to Do More to Police Hate on Sites

Twitter to soon release Snapchat like feature. VOA
Twitter to soon release Snapchat like feature. VOA

Tech giants Facebook, Twitter and Google are taking steps to police terrorists and hate groups on their sites, but more work needs to be done, the Simon Wiesenthal Center said Tuesday.

The organization released its annual digital terrorism and hate report card and gave a B-plus to Facebook, a B-minus to Twitter and a C-plus to Google.

Facebook spokeswoman Christine Chen said the company had no comment on the report. Representatives for Google and Twitter did not immediately return emails seeking comment.

ALSO READ: Social Media: Here is how it is creating Lifestyle pressure on Youth!

Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay
Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay

Rabbi Abraham Cooper, the Wiesenthal Center’s associate dean, said Facebook in particular built “a recognition that bad folks might try to use their platform” as its business model. “There is plenty of material they haven’t dealt with to our satisfaction, but overall, especially in terms of hate, there’s zero tolerance,” Cooper said at a New York City news conference.

Rick Eaton, a senior researcher at the Wiesenthal Center, said hateful and violent posts on Instagram, which is part of Facebook, are quickly removed, but not before they can be widely shared.

He pointed to Instagram posts threatening terror attacks at the upcoming World Cup in Moscow. Another post promoted suicide attacks with the message, “You only die once. Why not make it martyrdom.”

Cooper said Twitter used to merit an F rating before it started cracking down on Islamic State tweets in 2016. He said the move came after testimony before a congressional committee revealed that “ISIS was delivering 200,000 tweets a day.”

ALSO READ: Teenagers using Social Media more likely to suffer sleep deprivations: Study

This photo shows Facebook launched on an iPhone, in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017. VOA

Cooper and Eaton said that as the big tech companies have gotten more aggressive in shutting down accounts that promote terrorism, racism and anti-Semitism, promoters of terrorism and hate have migrated to other sites such as, a Facebook lookalike that’s based in Russia.

There also are “alt-tech” sites like GoyFundMe, an alternative to GoFundMe, and BitChute, an alternative to Google-owned YouTube, Cooper said.

“If there’s an existing company that will give them a platform without looking too much at the content, they’ll use it,” he said. “But if not, they are attracted to those platforms that have basically no rules.”

The Los Angeles-based Wiesenthal Center is dedicated to fighting anti-Semitism, hate, and terrorism. (VOA)