Saturday February 24, 2018
Home Uncategorized British journ...

British journalist: T E Lawrence more than just a Middle East explorer

0
//
144
Image source: theguardian.com
Republish
Reprint

New Delhi: British journalist and author Anthony Sattin talks about the legacy of T E Lawrence, who understood the Middle Eastern region and its functioning in relation to tribe, ethnicities and religion. With the Middle East in turmoil and much of the blame being put on the post-World War I settlement imposed by western powers, Lawrence’s’ study works became all the more significant now.

“If Lawrence came back today, he would most likely say ‘Told you so’, with regard to the viability of the series of the independent Arab states, all ruled by the Hashemites (notably Iraq), whom the British backed.”

“It is a tragedy that Western political and military leaders have not understood, as Lawrence did, the delicate patchwork between tribe, ethnicities and religion in the region,” Sattin, whose main focus is the Middle East and Africa and has extensively traveled and written on the region, told reporters in an interview.

The author of ‘Young Lawrence: A Portrait of the Legend as a Young Man‘ (2014), which seeks to trace Lawrence’s pre-war life and the influences that instilled in him a rare understanding of the region, says he wrote the book to deal with the perceptions fostered by David Lean’s 1962 epic “Lawrence of Arabia”.

“For one, the film shows Lawrence as tall since Peter O’ Toole who played him was… but the real Lawrence was quite short.

“Then, according to the film, it seems that Lawrence came to the Middle East during the First World War and jumped into participating in the Arab revolt, (but) he first visited the region in 1909 and spent the period of 1910-14 as an archaeologist in (then Ottoman) Syria,” said Sattin, who was in India to attend the Jaipur Literature Festival.

Though Lawrence (1888-1935) wrote much about his own life and activities, he did not dwell on his early years in them and it is believed that the first version of his “Seven Pillars of Wisdom”, which we now know as his masterly account of the Arab revolt, dealt with this but was reportedly destroyed by him in 1914.

“Even Jeremy Wilson, who is considered to have written the definitive biography (‘Lawrence of Arabia: The Authorised Biography of T. E. Lawrence‘, 1989) has not focussed on it… one part of his life is not covered and Lawrence has become an image.”

“I have tried to make a real person… give him complexity,” says Sattin, whose work focusses on Lawrence’s birth (out of wedlock), his difficult relationship with dominating mother, his deep affection for an Arab boy, his extraordinary journeys in the Middle East, and why he became an archaeologist and a spy.

On this Arab boy, Selim Ahmed alias “Dahoum” or the dark one, who was a water boy at the site but Lawrence made him his assistant, he says it was clear that Lawrence was in love with him, but dismisses it was a sexual relationship, as many have claimed.

“It was like (ancient) Greek love of an older man for a younger boy. I don’t think that it was sexual though many like (renowned archaeologist) Leonard Woolley who also worked at the site, cited a naked sculpture that Lawrence did and claimed it was modelled on Dahoum and had outraged the local people” he said.

Despite Lawrence writing about homosexuality in “Seven Pillars..”, Sattin holds Lawrence himself was not one. “He was pretty sexless…thought sex to be disgusting.”

On the current regional situation, Sattin says he has traveled recently through Egypt, Algeria, Tunisia, Iran and Turkey, and found “great despair, corruption, oppression and lack of vision in policy”, but before the Arab Spring, there was hopelessness and “there is now some hope, even with the counter-revolutions and civil war”.

Though leaders like Turkey’s Recip Tayyip Erdogan, Algeria’s Abdelaziz Bouteflika and Egypt’s Abdel Fattah al-Sisi have made it difficult to protest, “steam was building up” and it would be difficult to contain until the economies build up, he said, but added he was hopeful that things can turn around. (Vikas Datta, IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Attention Readers! Here are Five Books to Look Forward to in November 2017

While October saw a diverse bookshelf, ranging from "Finding my Virginity," by Richard Branson to "The Bhojpuri Kitchen," by Pallavi Nigam Sahay, the upcoming month is more about concrete titles by well-known faces.

0
//
59
books
Looking for books to read in November? We have got you covered! Pixabay

New Delhi, October 30, 2017 : With the Nobel Prize for Literature and the Man Booker Prize – the two most coveted literary honors – having been awarded earlier in October, the literary season has indeed set in.

Two literature festivals have just concluded in the national capital. The DSC Prize for South Asian Literature will be announced in about two weeks, while the Jaipur Literature Festival is also round the corner. What better time for publishing houses to release the most-awaited books of the year?

While October saw a diverse bookshelf, ranging from “Finding my Virginity,” by Richard Branson to “The Bhojpuri Kitchen,” by Pallavi Nigam Sahay, the upcoming month is more about concrete titles by well-known faces.

Here are five books we can’t wait to read this November

1. “The Book of Chocolate Saints” by Jeet Thayil (Aleph)

One of the most-awaited literary books of the year by Jeet Thayil, a past winner of the DSC prize, the Sahitya Akademi Award and a finalist of the Man Booker Prize. In incandescent prose, Thayil tells the story of Newton Francis Xavier, blocked poet, serial seducer of young women, reformed alcoholic (but only just), philosopher, recluse, all-round wild man and India’s greatest living painter. At the age of 66, Xavier, who has been living in New York, is getting ready to return to the land of his birth to stage one final show of his work (accompanied by a mad bacchanal). Narrated in a huge variety of voices and styles, all of which blend seamlessly into a novel of remarkable accomplishment, “The Book of Chocolate Saints” is the sort of literary masterpiece that only comes along once in a very long time.

2. “Conflicts of Interest” by Sunita Narain (Penguin)

One of India’s foremost environmentalists, Sunita Narain gives a personal account of her battles as part of the country’s Green Movement. While outlining the enormous environmental challenges that India faces today, Narain says political interests often scuttle their effective resolution. She recounts some widely reported controversies triggered by research undertaken by her along with her team at the Centre for Science and Environment, such as the pesticides in colas report, air pollution research in Delhi and endosulfan research in Karnataka, among others. Narain also includes an ‘environmental manifesto’, a blueprint for the direction India must take if it is to deal with the exigencies of climate change and environmental degradation.

3. “Life among the Scorpions” by Jaya Jaitly (Rupa)

From arranging relief for victims of the 1984 Sikh riots, to joining politics under firebrand leader George Fernandes, to becoming president of the Samata Party — a key ally in the erstwhile NDA Government – Jaya Jaitly’s rise in Indian mainstream politics invited both awe and envy. All this even as she continued her parallel fight for the livelihood of craftsmen on the one hand, and conceptualised and ensured establishment of the first Dilli Haat in 1994, on the other. With all the backstories of major events in Indian politics between 1970 and 2000, including her experience of dealing with the Commission of Inquiry and courts regarding the Tehelka sting, the story of Jaya Jaitly makes for a riveting read. A powerful narrative on why being a woman in politics was for her akin to being surrounded by scorpions; this is one of the best books set for release and a hard hitting memoir that offers a perspective on the functioning of Indian politics from a woman’s point of view.

4. “Chase Your Dreams” by Sachin Tendulkar (Hachette India)

Why should adults have all the fun? In his career spanning 24 years, hardly any records have escaped Sachin Tendulkar’s masterly touch. Besides being the highest run scorer in Tests and ODIs, he also uniquely became the first and only batsman to score 100 international centuries and play 200 Tests. His proficient stroke-making is legendary, as is his ability to score runs in all parts of the field and all over the world. And Tendulkar has now come up with this uniquely special edition of his autobiography for young readers.

5. “China’s India War” by Bertil Lintner (Oxford University Press)

The Sino-Indian War of 1962 delivered a crushing defeat to India: not only did the country suffer a loss of lives and a heavy blow to its pride, the world began to see India as the provocateur of the war, with China ‘merely defending’ its territory. This perception that China was largely the innocent victim of Nehru’s hostile policies was put forth by journalist Neville Maxwell in his book “India’s China War,” which found readers in many opinion makers, including Henry Kissinger and Richard Nixon. For far too long, Maxwell’s narrative, which sees India as the aggressor and China as the victim, has held court. Nearly 50 years after Maxwell’s book, Bertil Lintner’s “China’s India War” puts the ‘border dispute’ into its rightful perspective. Lintner argues that China began planning the war as early as 1959 and proposes that it was merely a small move in the larger strategic game that China was playing to become a world player — one that it continues to play even today. (IANS)

(Editorial note : This article has been written by Saket Suman and was first published at IANS. Saket can be contacted at saket.s@ians.in)