Monday November 12, 2018
Home World British Musli...

British Muslim sentenced to Life Imprisonment for ISIS-Inspired Knife Attack

The judge said Syed must serve at least 15 years but he may never be released.

1
//
Representational Image. Man in prison.
Republish
Reprint
  • Nadir Syed was arrested hours after buying a chef’s knife in November 2014
  • The ‘fatwa’ that inspired Nadir Syed urged followers to rise up against westerners and “rig the roads with explosives for them
  • Syed had also tried to travel to Syria to fight with ISIS militants in January 2014

LONDON: Nadir Syed, the British Muslim man convicted of plotting an ISIS-inspired knife attack in London in November 2014 was sentenced to life imprisonment by a UK court on June 23.

He was arrested hours after buying a chef’s knife in November 2014, years before Remembrance Sunday – held on the second Sunday of November to commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth soldiers in the two World Wars.
The judge said Syed must serve at least 15 years but he may never be released.

During his trial last year, Woolwich Crown Court heard how the 22-year-old from Southall area of west London had been inspired by ISIS leaders urging attacks on Western targets, including police and soldiers.

“I am satisfied that the attack was going to take place at a time close to Armistice Day. I am also satisfied that the victim was to be someone connected to Armistice Day, such as a popper seller,” Justice Saunders said.

“I have no doubt that he is dangerous. In my judgement if he was released from prison he would go and try and carry out what he failed to achieve in this case. He would set out to kill in furtherance of his beliefs,” he ruled during sentencing today.

Image Source: brunchnews.com

Follow NewsGram on Twitter: @newsgram1

Prosecutor Max Hill had said Syed was actively searching for knives of “sufficient quality to source an attack”.

The court heard how Syedhad expressed admiration for the killers of soldier Lee Rigby, who had been killed on the street of London in May 2013, and how he shared violent footage of beheading from Syria and Iraq on social media.

The prosecution said the fatwa that inspired Nadir Syed urged followers to rise up against westerners and “rig the roads with explosives for them. Attack their bases. Raid their homes. Cut off their heads.”

“This fatwa, and the worldwide attacks that followed, inspired the defendant to plan his own attack in this country, emulating the attack on Lee Rigby carried out by Michael Adebolajo, who he considered to be a mujahid or Islamic fighter,” Hill said.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook: NewsGram

The jury could not reach verdicts on two other men on trial – Haseeb Hamayoon, 29, and Yousaf Syed, 20 – who had all denied planning acts of terrorism. They were cleared at a retrial.

Syed had also tried to travel to Syria to fight with ISIS militants but had been stopped from leaving the country in January 2014, it emerged in court. (PTI)

ALSO READ:

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Strict action should be taken against such people. They should be sentenced to life imprisonment

Next Story

Should Promote Human Rights More In Myanmar: Facebook

Facebook has roughly 20 million users in Myanmar, according to BSR, which warned Facebook faces several unresolved challenges in Myanmar.

0
Facebook, myanmar
A cellphone user looks at a Facebook page at a shop in Latha street, Yangon, Myanmar. VOA

Facebook on Monday said a human rights report it commissioned on its presence in Myanmar showed it had not done enough to prevent its social network from being used to incite violence.

The report by San Francisco-based nonprofit Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) recommended that Facebook more strictly enforce its content policies, increase engagement with both Myanmar officials and civil society groups and regularly release additional data about its progress in the country.

“The report concludes that, prior to this year, we weren’t doing enough to help prevent our platform from being used to foment division and incite offline violence. We agree that we can and should do more,” Alex Warofka, a Facebook product policy manager, said in a blog post.

facebook, U.S., myanmar
A protester wearing a mask with the face of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, in between men wearing angry face emoji masks, is seen during a demonstration against Facebook outside Portcullis in London. VOA

BSR also warned that Facebook must be prepared to handle a likely onslaught of misinformation during Myanmar’s 2020 elections, and new problems as use of its WhatsApp grows in Myanmar, according to the report, which Facebook released.

A Reuters special report in August found that Facebook failed to promptly heed numerous warnings from organizations in Myanmar about social media posts fueling attacks on minority groups such as the Rohingya.

In August 2017 the military led a crackdown in Myanmar’s Rakhine State in response to attacks by Rohingya insurgents, pushing more than 700,000 Muslims to neighboring Bangladesh, according to U.N. agencies.

Rohingya, India, myanmar
A man from the Rohingya community fills out an identification form provided by local police inside his shop at a camp in New Delhi. VOA

 

The social media website in August removed several Myanmar military officials from the platform to prevent the spread of “hate and misinformation,” for the first time banning a country’s military or political leaders.

It also removed dozens of accounts for engaging in a campaign that “used seemingly independent news and opinion pages to covertly push the messages of the Myanmar military.”

The move came hours after United Nations investigators said the army carried out mass killings and gang rapes of Muslim Rohingya with “genocidal intent.”

Facebook said it has begun correcting shortcomings.

myanmar, facebook
A deforested section of the Chakmakul camp for Rohingya refugees clings to a hillside in southern Bangladesh, Feb. 13, 2018. VOA

Facebook said that it now has 99 Myanmar language specialists reviewing potentially questionable content. In addition, it has expanded use of automated tools to reduce distribution of violent and dehumanizing posts while they undergo review.

Also Read: Video: Orange Rallies in US Honor Victims of Gun Violence

In the third quarter, the company said it “took action” on about 64,000 pieces of content that violated its hate speech policies. About 63 percent were identified by automated software, up from 52 percent in the prior quarter.

Facebook has roughly 20 million users in Myanmar, according to BSR, which warned Facebook faces several unresolved challenges in Myanmar.

BSR said locating staff there, for example, could aid in Facebook’s understanding of how its services are used locally but said its workers could be targeted by the country’s military, which has been accused by the U.N. of ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya. (VOA)