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British speaker honours Indian icons in London

Parliament Speaker John Bercow honoured prominent Indian icons

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John Bercow- wikimedia commons

Parliament Speaker John Bercow urged the Indian diaspora in Britain to engage more with mainstream politics and get proper representation in parliament.

“The community makes a huge contribution to British life, and I hope its members will continue to build on its successes, both in terms of representation in Parliament and more widely across our national life,” the Asian Lite daily quoted Bercow as saying.

He made the speech last week while presenting the Asian Lite Pranam Awards to seven prominent members of the British Indian community.

The award recipients were economist Lord Meghnad Desai, British-Indian politician Shreela Flather, BBC’s former sports editor Mihir Bose, refugee-turned-multi-millionaire Rami Ranger, Bharatiya Vidhya Bhavan Executive Director Mattur N. Nandakumara, rights activist and writer Zerbanoo Gifford, and T. Ramachandran, CEO and MD of Bristol Laboratories.

The event, held at Bharatiya Vidhya Bhavan, was attended by several prominent members of the Indian community and British MPs including Bob Blackman.

The Pranam Awards were instituted by the Asian Lite daily to honour members of the Indian community for their contribution to British culture, economy, business, media and sport sectors.

Seven members of the third generation British Asians — poetess Divya Mathur, media personality Rafeek Ravuther, London junior chamber former president Nahas Abdul Jaleel, Here and Now 365 MD Manish Tiwari, and journalists Dhiren Katwa and Navdeep Singh — paid tributes to the award winners.

Flather was the first Asian woman to receive a peerage and the first from the ethnic minorities in the House of Lords. She has worked for several humanitarian causes, fighting for social justice, refugees, community, race relations and those in prisons.

Meghnad Desai is a Labour Peer and spearheaded the campaign to install the Mahatma Gandhi Statue at Parliament Square in London. Desai, an ardent supporter of the Labour Party, wrote several books on economics. He was a former professor at the London School of Economics (LSE).

Rami Ranger is one of the most successful Indian-origin businessmen in Britain. His firm Sun Mark Ltd won six Queen’s Award. Ranger, the youngest son of Indian freedom fighter Nanak Singh, began his life as a refugee boy in Delhi and now runs a $280 million turn worth company.

T. Ramachandran helped Bristol Laboratories to grow from a company with one person and one product in 2001 to the one that employs over 600 people across Britain now.

Mihir Bose, who came to England to study engineering but was trained in accountancy, became one of the most respected journalists. He has worked with Sunday Times, Daily Telegraph and became the first sports editor for BBC.

Mattur Nandakumara is a Sanskrit scholar who teached at Cambridge and Eton. He hails from the only Sanskrit speaking village of Mattur in Karnataka and holds a PhD in devotional literature from School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London.

Zerbanoo Gifford was the first non-white woman to stand for British Parliament in 1982. She won several recognitions for her involvement in national and international humanitarian activities.

Zerbanoo was elected to the Liberal Party’s Federal Executive, again the first non-white to be elected onto any governing body of a British political party.(IANS)

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Indian-Origin Doctor Manish Shah charged with 118 Sex Offences in UK

The doctor, Manish Shah, is also charged with one count of sexual assault on a child under the age of 13

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Indian-origin doctor in UK
Dr. Manish Shah charged with sexual assault. Wikimedia
  • A 47-year-old Indian-origin doctor in east London was charged with 118 sex offences, including one assault on a child under 13
  • Shah is out on bail and is due to appear on August 31 at Barkingside Magistrates’ Court in London
  • The charges announced today follow a long-running investigation into Shah, who has been bailed several times after first being arrested in 2013

London, August 3, 2017:  A 47-year-old Indian-origin doctor in east London was on Thursday charged with 118 sex offenses, including one assault on a child under 13, by the Scotland Yard.

Dr Manish Shah, from Brunel Close in Romford area of the city, is accused of 65 counts of assault by penetration and 52 allegations of sexual assault, the Metropolitan Police said.

The doctor is also charged with one count of sexual assault on a child under the age of 13.

“Manish Shah has been charged with 65 assault by penetration, contrary to Section 2 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003, 52 sexual assault, contrary to Section 3 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003, and 1 sexual assault on a child under 13 years, contrary to Section 7 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003,” the Met Police said in a statement today.

Shah is out on bail and is due to appear on August 31 at Barkingside Magistrates’ Court in London.

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“The NHS (National Health Service) has a dedicated number for any individuals who may have concerns or questions. They can be contacted on 0800 011 4253,” the Met Police said.

The offences are alleged to have occurred between June 2004 and July 2013 and relate to 54 victims.

The charges announced today follow a long-running investigation into Shah, who has been bailed several times after first being arrested in 2013. (IANS)

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Scientists develop New Surgical Glue Inspired by Slug Slime as Alternative to Sutures and Staples for Closing Wounds

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A slug rests on a finger of a gardener in a park in London, April 29, 2016. Scientists have studied the mucus of snails to develop an experimental surgical glue.
  • Scientists developed a medical adhesive inspired by slug slime
  • The surgical glue is said to be strong, non-toxic and the best replacement to sutures and staples for healing wounds
  • The first such experiment was inspired by the sticking properties of underwater mussels

Scientists have developed an experimental surgical glue inspired by the mucus secreted by slugs that could offer an alternative to sutures and staples for closing wounds.

While some medical glues already exist, they often adhere weakly, are not particularly flexible and frequently cannot be used in very wet conditions.

To get around those problems, a group of scientists from Harvard and other research centers decided to learn from slugs, which — as well as making slime to glide on — can produce extremely adhesive mucus as a defense mechanism.

The slugs’ trick is to generate a substance that not only forms strong bonds on wet surfaces but also has a matrix that dissipates energy at the point of adhesion, making it highly flexible.

Strong, nontoxic

The man-made version of this tough adhesive is based on the same principles and in a series of experiments reported in the journal Science on Thursday it was shown to adhere strongly to pig skin, cartilage, tissue and organs. It also proved nontoxic to human cells.

In one test, the new glue was used to close a wound in a blood-covered pig’s heart and successfully maintained a leak-free seal after the heart was inflated and deflated tens of thousands of times.

In another case it was applied to a laceration in a rat’s liver and performed just as well as a hemostat, a surgical tool often used in operations to control bleeding.

“There are a variety of potential uses and in some settings this could replace sutures and staples, which can cause damage and be difficult to place in certain situations,” said researcher David Mooney, professor of bioengineering at Harvard.

Mussel-inspired glue

Mooney and colleagues envisage the new adhesive will be made in sheets and cut to size, although they have also developed an injected version for closing deep wounds. The injection would be hardened using ultraviolet light, like dental fillings.

It is not the first time that scientists have taken inspiration from nature to devise a better medical adhesive.

Four years ago, another research group developed a glue inspired by the underwater sticking properties of mussels, but Mooney thinks slugs win hands-down in terms of stickiness and flexibility.

The scientists are applying for patents, although it will require a commercial company to then license the technology and take it into the next phase of human clinical trials. (VOA)

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Weekly Social Hour is all you Need to Help Dementia Patients

Nearly 70% people living in care homes suffer from dementia, so it is only fair that the staff in the care homes have the right training to provide good quality dementia care

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Dementia
Dementia treatment. Wikimedia
  • Person-centred activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction will be very helpful for people with dementia living in care homes
  • This trial was conducted with more than 800 participants living with dementia across 69 care homes in South London, North London and Buckingham-shire
  • Also, this particular approach saved money in comparison with the standard care

Washington DC, July 17, 2017: According to a recent survey, quality of life can be improved and agitation can be reduced, while saving money, for people with dementia living in care homes with the help of person-centred activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction.

The University of Exeter, King’s College London and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust led the findings from a large-scale trial that were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2017 (AAIC).

This trial was conducted with more than 800 participants living with dementia across 69 care homes in South London, North London and Buckingham-shire. The study involved two ‘care staff champions’ at each home who were trained over four day-long sessions, to take simple measures that such as involve talking to residents about their interests and decisions around their own care. When combined with just one hour a week of social interaction, it improved quality of life and reduced agitation.

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Also, this particular approach saved money in comparison with the standard care. Researchers believe that the next key challenge is to roll the programme to the 28,000 care homes in the UK that will benefit the lives of the 300,000 people with dementia living in these facilities.

According to ANI report, the lead researcher in the project, Clive Ballard said that people with dementia who are living in care homes can be considered among the most vulnerable in our society. “Incredibly, of 170 carer training manuals available on the market, only four are based on evidence that they really work. Our outcomes show that good staff training and just one hour a week of social interaction significantly improves quality of life for a group of people who can often be forgotten by society,” she added.

Doug Brown, Director of Research for Alzheimer’s Society, feels that 70% of people living in care homes suffer from dementia. That is why it is necessary for the staff to have the right training to provide the best quality dementia care.

– prepared by Durba Mandal of NewsGram. Twitter @dubumerang