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Bueno: catering to multi-cuisine woes at your door

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Gurgaon: You need not go looking for menus from different food outlets now. The Gurgaon-based home delivery platform Bueno will cater to all your cuisine woes by offering American, Mexican, European, Italian, Lebanese, Indian and Asian cuisines at your doorstep.

Bueno comes with the convenience of the online and app route.

What makes Bueno stand out from most home delivery platforms is that for those who either live or work in the capital suburb, it is a one-stop to get the most popular dishes from all seven cuisines.

Trying out its pasta, biryani, burgers and brownies, all prepared by Bueno’s team of five-star chefs, turned out to be satisfactory.

Explaining the concept behind the platform, Bueno co-founder Rohan Arora told reporters: “As the name suggests, Bueno means good. It is largely about serving good food. We don’t stand for a specific cuisine, we serve in all locations here (in Gurgaon) as our platform is consumer- centric.

“People are different, they eat different things, so why do you really need to contain them to ‘I serve Indian, I serve Mexican or I serve Chinese’ be there? I serve what you want to eat.”

The Bueno special chicken biryani with raita (flavored and beaten curd) will impress you with its good quantity, especially if you are the only one eating it and depending on your hunger level. The chicken was well-cooked and the spices were just right – neither too chilli nor too bland.

“Indian cuisine sells the most here; biryanis and curries the most. Then comes Italian pasta and Chinese dishes are ordered often. But these are meals and away from meals, snacky food, rolls and burgers sell really good,” Arora said.

It was best then to try the burgers, which turned out to be scrumptious.

The mutton seekh burger was different and melted in the mouth. Huge and packed with minced meat and veggies, this one is a must try if you are a burger lover.

Also, if you are inclined towards healthy food, try the pita bread and hummus. While the hummus is finger-licking good, the pita bread tasted like white bread after a while.

The pasta, for many, is a safer option to order from an international cuisine outlet. So, I went with the penne basil pesto chicken variety. But something was amiss. Perhaps some cheese? A caution: Consume the pasta when it arrives, or the dried version won’t be tempting at all!

Now for those with a sweet tooth, Bueno is coming up with a broader and new menu, but still offers walnut brownie, tiramisu (in a jar) and blueberry cheesecake (in a jar). The brownie is a delight. Keep some vanilla ice-cream ready in the freezer, and it gets better with every bite.

The Bueno team plans to expand operations in Delhi and Noida, but they want Gurgaon to be “our anchor”. (Kishori Sud, IANS)

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Farmers To Grow Modified Cotton With Its Seed Edible

Many of the world’s roughly 80 cotton-producing countries, especially in Asia and Africa, have populations that face malnutrition that could be addressed with the new plant

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Cotton
An experimental cotton plant is shown at a Texas A&M research facility in this handout image provided by the Texas A&M University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences in College Station, Texas, U.S. VOA

U.S. regulators have cleared the way for farmers to grow a cotton plant genetically modified to make the cottonseed edible for people, a protein-packed potential new food source that could be especially useful in cotton-growing countries beset with malnutrition.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service on Tuesday lifted the regulatory prohibition on cultivation by farmers of the cotton plant, which was developed by Texas A&M University scientists. The plant’s cottonseed cannot be used as food for people or as animal feed yet in the United States because it lacks Food and Drug Administration approval.

Cotton
Cotton plant. pixabay

Cotton is widely grown around the world, with its fiber used to make textiles and the cottonseed used among other things to feed animals such as cattle and sheep that have multiple stomach chambers. Ordinary cottonseed is unfit for humans and many animals to eat because it contains high levels of gossypol, a toxic chemical.

With financial help from a cotton industry group, scientists led by Texas A&M AgriLife Research plant biotechnologist Keerti Rathore used so-called RNAi, or RNA interference, technology to “silence” a gene, virtually eliminating gossypol from the cottonseed. They left gossypol at natural levels in the rest of the plant because it guards against insects and disease.

“To me, personally, it tastes somewhat like chickpea and it could easily be used to make a tasty hummus,” Rathore said of gossypol-free cottonseed.

After cottonseed oil, which can be used for cooking, is extracted, the remaining high-protein meal from the new cotton plant can find many uses, Rathore said.

Cotton
If all of the cottonseed currently produced worldwide were used for human nutrition, it could meet the daily protein requirements of about 575 million people. Pixabay

It can be turned into flour for use in breads, tortillas and other baked goods and used in protein bars, while whole cottonseed kernels, roasted and salted, can be consumed as a snack or to create a peanut butter type of paste, Rathore added.

If all of the cottonseed currently produced worldwide were used for human nutrition, it could meet the daily protein requirements of about 575 million people, Rathore said.

Other countries would have to give regulatory approval for the new cotton plant to be grown, though U.S. regulatory action often is taken into consideration.

Also Read: Food Cooked on The Barbecue Can Impair Your Lungs

The new cottonseed’s biggest commercial use may be as feed for poultry, swine and farmed aquatic species like fish and shrimp, Rathore said.

Many of the world’s roughly 80 cotton-producing countries, especially in Asia and Africa, have populations that face malnutrition that could be addressed with the new plant, Rathore added. (VOA)