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Bus driver suffers heart attack: 2 dead, 5 injured

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New Delhi: A city bus went out of control in Old Delhi area on Friday when the driver suffered a cardiac arrest, knocking down seven pedestrians.  Two of the pedestrians died, as did the driver, said police.

The incident occurred around 2.15 pm near Kotwali police station close to the crowded Chandni Chowk area in the walled city, a police official said.

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Image Source: www.ians.in

Of the pedestrians, Keshu Prashad, 55, whose face was smashed in the incident, and Suraj, 21, who was crushed under the wheel, died on the spot. Five others — Santosh Kumar, 19, his brother Mahender Kumar, 24, Rajesh Kurma, 45, Suriender, 30, and Raj Kishore, 22 — were left injured.

Bus driver Wajid Ali, 40, a resident of east Delhi, who was rushed to Sushruta Trauma Centre was declared dead due to cardiac arrest. “We received five patients, two of them were brought dead,” SM Basna, chief medical officer of Sushruta Trauma Centre, stated.

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Image Source: www.ians.in

Three other injured persons were taken to Lok Nayak Jai Prakash Hospital, where one of them, Suraj, was declared brought dead, a police official remarked.

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Image Source: www.ians.in

(With inputs from IANS)

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Anti-inflammatory Drugs May Put You at Heart Attack Risk

One should also rest and drink plenty of fluids if symptoms are mild or moderate, DePalma noted

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Heart Attack, women
Anti-inflammatory drugs may put you at heart attack risk. Pixabay

If you have been hit by the winter cold and are thinking about taking medicines that relieve your aches, pains and congestion, be careful. Those may also put your heart at risk, the American Heart Association has warned.

A study has showed that both decongestants and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), found in many cold medicines, were listed as medications that could increase blood pressure.

People who used NSAIDs while sick were more than three times as likely to have a heart attack within a week compared with the same time period about a year earlier when participants were neither sick nor taking an NSAID.

“People with uncontrolled high blood pressure or heart disease should avoid taking oral decongestants. And for the general population or someone with low cardiovascular risk, they should use them with the guidance of a health care provider,” said Sondra DePalma, from the University of Pittsburgh in the US.

Decongestants like pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine constrict blood vessels. They allow less fluid into your sinuses, “which dries you up”, said Erin Michos, associate director of preventive cardiology at the Johns Hopkins Univerity’s Ciccarone Center in Baltimore.

The biggest concerns are for people who have had a heart attack or stroke, or have heart failure or uncontrolled high blood pressure, Michos said, in the paper published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Representational image. (IANS)

Importantly, healthy people might also be at risk.

For the study, researchers looked at nearly 10,000 people with respiratory infections who were hospitalised for heart attacks.

Participants were 72 years old on average at the time of their heart attacks and many had cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

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People who are sick should use both classes of medications — decongestants and NSAIDs — judiciously and understand the potential side effects.

In addition, decongestants should not be taken longer than seven days before consulting with a healthcare provider, DePalma said.

One should also rest and drink plenty of fluids if symptoms are mild or moderate, DePalma noted.  (IANS)