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Cameroonians are opting farming to stay away from Boko Haram

Cameroon is a neighbor to Nigeria where Boko Haram thrives. Ibrahim Hamaoua, traditional ruler of Zamai, said the assistance has reduced delinquency among the 30,000 people he leads.

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Local women in Cameroon. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Cameroon is a neighboring country of Nigeria. Boko Haram -an Islamic terrorist organization -has wreaked havoc in Nigeria and is spilling over to other African countries.

Cameroonian Yeguie Issa says he has not seen his only brother since they were contacted a year ago by visitors to their village and were offered $500 per month to join Boko Haram.

Issa, 29, did not accept the offer and now takes care of his poultry farm in Cameroon’s Zamai village, near the northern town of Mokollo. He got started with the help of chickens provided by the government and farming advice from U.N. staff.

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Cameroon borders Nigeria. Wikimedia Commons

As a result, Issa said, he is financially and physically more stable, and he can provide for his wife, three children, and 72-year-old mother — and peers no longer jeer at him for being unable to take care of his family.

Issa is one of several hundred people who have benefited from the U.N. initiative to steer youths away from Boko Haram, which has frequently attacked northern Cameroon over the past three years.

 Cameroon soldiers stand guard at a lookout post near the village of Fotokol as they take part in operations against the Islamic extremist group Boko Haram, Feb. 25, 2015.

The coordinator of the U.N. system in Cameroon, Najad Rochdi, said the goal of the initiative is helping the area’s economy grow despite the continued violence.

Because the region was tragically and dramatically impacted by insecurity on the one hand and extreme violence, on the other hand, it was very important to provide the enabling environment for the revival of the local economy, capitalizing on the know-how of the people in the region,” Rochdi said. “Obviously, the know-how here is about agriculture, handicraft, agropastoral activities.”

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Military exercise, Wikimedia commons

Japan contributes

Cameroon has provided $4 million in emergency funds to create jobs for youths on its northern border with Nigeria, where the unemployment rate is over 90 percent. Japan has contributed $2 million to the U.N. for the second phase of the project, focused on the entire conflict zone in Cameroon.

Ibrahim Hamaoua, traditional ruler of Zamai, said the assistance has reduced delinquency among the 30,000 people he leads.

Hamaoua said he was grateful to the U.N. Development Program and the government of Cameroon for initiating the resilience project and constructing a livestock market to supply protein to both internally displaced persons and refugees. The project has boosted the local economy and improved the living conditions of the population that grow livestock, he said.

About a hundred meters from Issa’s poultry farm, Hamza Falama waters his one-hectare garden. He said the produce villagers grow — maize and sorghum during the rainy season, carrots, and cabbages during the dry season — enable them to send their children to school, take care of their health needs, feed their families and save for difficult moments.

Cameroon hopes to see more gardens grow, and fewer difficult moments in the north, in order to weaken Boko Haram. (VOA)

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Fukushima’s Nuclear Power Plant: Japan Begins Removing Fuel

The three units at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant melted down after a major earthquake, followed by a tsunami struck Japan in 2011, killing about 18 thousand people and forced the evacuation of areas near the plant.

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Tour guide Katsuaki Shiga, right, and a tourist check radiation levels at Joroku Park, near Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, May 17, 2018. VOA

The operator of Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power plant began removing fuel rods Monday from one of three reactors that melted down in 2011.

The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) said workers started removing the first of the used and unused fuel units from a cooling pool at reactor 3.

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The three units at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant melted down after a major earthquake, followed by a tsunami struck Japan in 2011, killing about 18 thousand people and forced the evacuation of areas near the plant. Pixabay

The operation was was more than four years behind schedule, and had a short further delay Monday afternoon, after a problem with the equipment, but resumed after the mishap was addressed.

TEPCO has estimated that it will take up to two years to remove 566 of nuclear fuel rods from that reactor.

 

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After the cleaning operation at Unit 3, TEPCO expects to continue with the removal of 1000 nuclear fuel rods from the storage pools of reactors one and two. VOA

 

The work is being managed remotely from a control room about 500 meters away, because of high radiation level still present inside the building of Unit 3.

After the cleaning operation at Unit 3, TEPCO expects to continue with the removal of 1000 nuclear fuel rods from the storage pools of reactors one and two.

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The three units at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant melted down after a major earthquake, followed by a tsunami struck Japan in 2011, killing about 18 thousand people and forced the evacuation of areas near the plant. (VOA)