Sunday November 19, 2017

Cave Painting of Human Hand Prints belonging to Palaeolithic Era found by Archaeologists in China’s Inner Mongolia region

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An ancient Chinese hand-cliff painting (representative image), Wikimedia

Beijing, May 24, 2017: Archaeologists in China’s Inner Mongolia region recently found cave painting of human hand prints that they estimate to date back to the Palaeolithic Era, an official said on Wednesday.It has been proposed that the painting in Alxa Right Banner was part of a primitive religious ritual, Xinhua news agency reported.

The new discovery will be used to inform research into the ancient people who once lived in the region, local cultural relic bureau director Fan Rongnan said.

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The painting was composed of 14 hand prints of a brownish red hue, the colouring made from a combination of germanium powder, animal blood and water.

It was dispensed into bone-blow pipes and applied to the cave walls in this manner, according to Fan.

So far more than 30,000 collections of cliff paintings have been found in Alxa Right Banner, offering precious material for Chinese archaeological and anthropological research.

Hand-print cliff paintings have been discovered in Xinjiang Uygur region, Ningxia Hui region, Yunnan province and Inner Mongolia region. (IANS)

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Israeli Archaeologists Discover 2,000-year-old Stone Factory in Galilee

This factory is known to produce vessels similar to the one Jesus Christ used to turn water into wine

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Stone vessels used by Jews in Israel during Roman period. Wikimedia
  • This factory produced vessels similar to the ones Jesus Christ used to turn water into wine
  • During the Roman period, vessels were made of ceramics
  • Galilee is known for the Sea of Galilee, where Jesus Christ is said to have walked on water

Tel Aviv, August 11, 2017: Israeli archaeologists have discovered a 2,000-year-old stone factory in Galilee that produced vessels similar to the one Jesus Christ used to turn water into wine.

Excavations began after the site was discovered during construction work for a municipal sports centre, reports Efe news.

“The fact that Jews at this time used stone vessels for religious reasons is well attested in the Talmudic sources and in the New Testament as well,” Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologist Yardenna Alexandre said on Thursday.

ALSO READ: Egypt discovers new necropolis with as many as 30 intact mummies near the city of Minya

During the Roman period, vessels were made of ceramics: a material Jews considered impure and inappropriate for purification rituals because it is breakable, so they opted instead to use stone.

“It is possible that large stone containers of the type mentioned in the wedding at Cana of Galilee story may have been produced locally in Galilee,” Alexandre said.

“Our excavations are highlighting the pivotal role of ritual purity observance – not only in Jerusalem, but in the far-off Galilee as well,” excavation director Yonatan Adler said.

Galilee is a fertile, mountainous region in northern Israel. It is known for the Sea of Galilee, where Jesus Christ is said to have walked on water. (IANS)

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Humans existed in Bengaluru 4 lakh years ago, claims Archaeologist

"The discovery confirms man's existence in this area during the Stone Age," claimed Dr K B Shivatarak, retired professor of ancient history and archaeology, Mangalore University

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Palaeolithic stone tools. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • Shivatarak claims that the evidence was discovered in May 2016 near the Kadirenahalli underpass at Bendrenagar, Banashankari II Stage
  • The five stone implements collected by him from Banashankari includes scraper, miniature hand axe, leaf-like instrument, hand axe and hand stone
  • The remains are similar to that of stones founded near Abhimaan Studio near Kengeri

BENGALURU: An archaeologist claimed that Bengaluru city may have been home to humans since four lakh years and believes that he has unearthed the earliest pre-historic evidence in Bengaluru for the first time.

“The discovery confirms man’s existence in this area during the Stone Age,” claimed Dr K B Shivatarak, retired professor of ancient history and archaeology, Mangalore University.

Skeleton of Prehistoric Men. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
The skeleton of Prehistoric Men. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Shivatarak claims that the evidence was discovered in May 2016 near the Kadirenahalli underpass at Bendrenagar, Banashankari II Stage. BWSSB had decided to fix the leakage in the area by digging the road, mentioned the TOI report on July 7, 2016.

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Shivatarak was curious to look onto the stones, the workers have found out. When he washed the stones he found them closely related to the instruments he founded in Tumakuru, Mandya and Chitradurga districts where he researched earlier.

Palaeolithic stone instruments. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Palaeolithic stone instruments. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

The five stone instruments collected by him from Banashankari includes scraper, miniature hand axe, a leaf-like instrument, hand axe and hand stone. The miniature hand axe was made of quartz and quartzite. All the instruments were around 7-11cm long and 4-7cm broad.

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According to Shivtarak, the instruments were used by the prehistoric man for the hunting purposes. The stones were widely used in hunting and peeling off the animal skin. Shivatarak had not yet informed the archaeological department about his findings.

Miniature hand axe. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Miniature hand axe. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Shivatarak claimed, this is the first time that Palaeolithic remains have been found in Bengaluru. The remains are similar to that of stones founded near Abhimaan Studio near Kengeri.

“I am studying these findings in detail,” said Shivatarak.

But, the other archaeologists are doubtful about the fact that whether the stone age was inhabited in the area where later Bengaluru came up. According to Prof. Ravi Kori Settar, retired professor of archaeology at Karnataka University, there is no scope for the Palaeolithic stone instruments in Bengaluru as no quartzite dig was found in the city, mentioned the TOI report.

Quartzite Cobbles. Image Source: www.pinterest.com
Quartzite Cobbles. Image Source: www.pinterest.com

Professor Settar also claimed that no Palaeolithic tools can be found in the granite area and hence must be Pseudolithic (look likes of Palaeolithic) or Erolits (mimic Palaeolithic caused due to some natural activity).

– prepared by Aparna Gupta, an intern with NewsGram. Twitter @writetoaparna99

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Most of the culture in Mongolia has come from India: Find out why ‘Culture is Power’!

Chandra who is proficient in several languages including Mongolian revealed that Kalidasa’s Meghdoota has a translation in Mongolian

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Mongolians. Image source: en.people.cn
  • Professor Lokesh Chandra who is proficient in several languages including Mongolian revealed that Kalidasa’s Meghdoota has a translation in Mongolian
  • Mongolia’s highest civilian award, the North Star, refers to ‘Dhruva Tara’ or ‘Sudarshan’
  • The Jibchundampa  are incarnations of Tara Nath from Tibet, all with Sanskrit names

However unlikely it may sound but the fact remains that the Indian culture had a significant influence on Mongolian ethos.

Talking about how potent culture is in the making of any nation, Vedic and Buddhist scholar Professor Lokesh Chandra explained that culture is not limited to art and dance but “culture is power.”

Chandra, 89, who is also the president of Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) pointed that even China is proud of its culture these days, but we (Indians) are not, in spite of being blessed with a rich cultural heritage.

Chandra who is proficient in several languages including Mongolian revealed that Kalidasa’s Meghdoota has a translation in Mongolian.

While being interviewed by Speaking Tree, he said, “The Astangahridaya Samhita of Vagbhata is translated in Mongolian and they follow it. Most of the culture in Mongolia has gone from India. We don’t realise it but India is a cultural superpower in Asia.”

Genghis Khan. Image source: biography.com
Genghis Khan. Image source: biography.com

Apart from our literary and Ayurvedic texts Mongolians fascination with Indian culture dates back to the very foundation of the empire. The proof of which is Lord Shiva’s Trishul (weapon used by Lord Shiva) that is depicted in the scepter of Emperor Genghis Khan, the founder of Mongol empire.

Tracing the history of this symbol, Chandra suggested that the symbol could have been borrowed from Kanishka’s Kushan dynasty when they were in Central Asia.

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Notably, the name of the Mongolian president during the communist period was also Shambu (another name for Lord Shiva).

Professor Chandra also puts forth the importance of Mongolia’s highest civilian award, the North Star, which refers to Dhruva Tara or Sudarshan.

Speaking on how imperative the North Star was for nomadic Mongols, Chandra iterated that since the tribe was rover in nature, they needed a constant reference point to determine the direction and so relied heavily on the North Star.

Interestingly, Professor Chandra has recently conferred the order of the North Star for “his scholarly contributions to the study of Buddhism in Mongolia and for fostering cultural ties between India and Mongolia that go back to his father, Professor Raghu Vira’s time.”

Mapping Mongolian tradition is also essential for us as the 13th-century ruler, Genghis Khan, with an elaborate empire, became the first Asian emperor to rule over Europe.

Claiming that a cultural renaissance is taking place and India needs to be a part of it, Chandra said, “With 11 countries in Asia being Buddhist, they are all looking up to India as a great cultural power — a fact we are not aware of. It is all shared cultural heritage. What we call culture is part of a much bigger system where everything is involved.”

Discussing the significant impact of Buddhism in shaping the present nature of Mongols, he explained that the religion gave Mongols a sense of stability. “Monasteries were built and the transition began from nomadic to settled life with development and buildings,” he added.

Mongol’s contribution to the world is huge. They not only gave paper currency but also for the first time, “opened the west to the east and the east to the west.”

Presently, Mongolians convert their water to Ganga water by chanting hymns written by local masters.

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Indicating a strong India-Mongolia connections, Prof Chandra says, “The Jibchundampa  are incarnations of Tara Nath from Tibet, all with Sanskrit names.They have now found an incarnation of Jibchundampa in India and officially recognised him. The Mongolian state is now supporting Buddhism in a big way because it is their identity. Mongolia has evolved a national form of Buddhism with a large Tibetan component, creating new sutras translating into Mongolian modern language, creating ethnic Mongolian Buddhism — all Vajrayana Buddhism.”

-This article has been prepared by Bulbul Sharma, a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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2 responses to “Most of the culture in Mongolia has come from India: Find out why ‘Culture is Power’!”

  1. The whole world studies and embraces Indian culture whereas we hardly have a sense of pride in our heritage. India ties the world together in more than one way.

  2. It is said that whole world is connected, which has proven true. Indian culture is inspiration for many others in the World.

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