Tuesday July 16, 2019
Home Education CBSE to Issue...

CBSE to Issue Module to Deter Students From Cheating

The official also debunked reports that the board is conducting exams early this year due to general election, saying its "completely wrong" and that early exams have nothing to do with the elections

0
//

The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) will be issuing an ‘instruction module’ to all schools to deter students from cheating, a senior Board official said on Friday.

The module was being worked on for quite some time and it has reached its final form on Friday, the official told IANS.

“Cheating is an individual malpractice. This year we are doing something special to bring down the instances of cheating. We will be issuing a module to the schools by next week. It talks about why cheating is unethical and immoral. It will have case studies to that effect,” the official said requesting anonymity.

According to media reports, the number of cases of cheating during CBSE exams doubled in 2017 from the previous year, rising from 56 in 2016 to 119 in 2017. The official said the number is around a similar figure in 2018 also.

The official also assured of leak-proof exams this year.

CBSE to issue module to deter students from cheating.

CBSE’s reputation of being a formidable examiner was delivered a blow in 2018 when question papers of Mathematics and Economics for Class 10 and 12 respectively were leaked to the students before the exams. The fiasco resulted in re-conducting of the Economics paper for Class 12 students.

“I cannot reveal the security mechanism we have brought in. But we have put in place a system which will help us identify any malpractice if it takes place. The system has been strengthened at all levels,” said the official.

Also Read- Actress Richa Chadha Looks at The #MeToo Movement Positively

The official also debunked reports that the board is conducting exams early this year due to general election, saying its “completely wrong” and that early exams have nothing to do with the elections.

“We are conducting exams a little early this year at the instruction of the Delhi High Court, which had said that the schools results should not coincide in anyway with the Delhi University admission. To that effect, the results this year will be announced early in May,” the official said.  (IANS)

Next Story

Petting Dogs, Cats Can Improve Students’ Mood: Study

These results were found even while considering that some students may have had very high or low levels to begin with

0
The results showed that the pups' attractiveness was lowest at birth and increased to a maximum before 10 weeks of age before declining and then levelling off.
Representational Image. pixabay

College is stressful. Students have classes, exams and so many other pressures common in modern life and now researchers have found that petting dogs and cats can improve students’ mood with stress-relieving physiological benefits, a study shows.

According to the study published in the journal AERA Open, many universities have instituted “Pet Your Stress Away” programmes, where students can come in and interact with cats and dogs.

“Just 10 minutes can have a significant impact,” students in our study that interacted with cats and dogs had a significant reduction in cortisol, a major stress hormone,” said Patricia Pendry, Associate Professor at Washington State University.

The study involved 249 college students randomly divided into four groups. The first group received hands-on interaction in small groups with cats and dogs for 10 minutes. They could pet, play with and generally hang out with the animals as they wanted.

To compare effects of different exposures to animals, the second group observed other people petting animals while they waited in line for their turn. The third group watched a slideshow of the same animals available during the intervention, while the fourth group was “waitlisted”.

“Relations with pets tend to be less complicated than those with humans, and pets are often a source of great enjoyment. They also provide older people with a sense of being needed and loved,” said Mary Janevic, researcher at the University of Michigan in the US.  Pixabay

According to the researchers, those students waited for their turn quietly for 10 minutes without their phones, reading materials or other stimuli, but were told they would experience animal interaction soon.

For the findings, several salivary cortisol samples were collected from each participant, starting in the morning when they woke up.

Once all the data was crunched from the various samples, the students who interacted directly with the pets showed significantly less cortisol in their saliva after the interaction.

Also Read: Truecaller Announces Global Launch of its Software Development Kit for Mobile Web

These results were found even while considering that some students may have had very high or low levels to begin with.

“What we wanted to learn was whether this exposure would help students reduce their stress in a less subjective way. And it did, which is exciting because the reduction of stress hormones may, over time, have significant benefits for physical and mental health,” Pendry said. (IANS)