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CDC says Asian Americans are the Healthiest in USA

Asian Americans include Chinese, Asian Indians, Japanese, Filipinos, Koreans

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Tribute to Asian Americans. Wikimedia Commons
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May 20,2016:

In the country of immigrants that we call USA, various races and ethnicity exist and thrive. Among them, Asian-American adults are the healthiest, both physically and psychologically, according to data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Of the group, which included Chinese, Filipinos, Asian Indians, Japanese, Vietnamese and Koreans, Chinese “reported better health on all five measures in this report compared with all U.S. adults.”

Asian Americans. Photo from CDC website
Asian Americans. Photo from CDC website

The measures include health status, multiple chronic conditions, serious psychological distress in the last month and limitations in work or social participation.

Vietnamese adults were the most likely to report fair or poor health status, but only 17 percent reported so. Still, that was higher than the national average of 12 percent.

Filipinos reported the most chronic conditions, while Japanese experienced the most work limitations, and Koreans were the most likely to report social participation limitations.

For the results, the CDC looked at data collected from nearly 166,000 adults between 2010 and 2014 as part of the National Health Interview Survey.

According to The Huffington Post, some researchers caution about reading too much into the data, saying the survey was skewed toward English speakers. Census data show many Asian-Americans don’t consider themselves proficient in English.

A survey that left out non-English speakers would likely miss those who were older and possibly in worse health.

About 15 million Asian-Americans live in the U.S., representing about 5 percent of the population. (VOA)

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Why Exercise on Empty Stomach May be Better for Your Health

This is the first study to show that feeding prior to acute exercise affects post-exercise adipose tissue gene expression

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The study analysed effects of eating versus fasting on gene expression in adipose (fat) tissue in response to exercise. Pixabay

If you have been wondering whether it is better to eat or fast before a workout, researchers now have an answer. A new study has found that exercise on empty stomach is better for your health in the long term.

The study analysed effects of eating versus fasting on gene expression in adipose (fat) tissue in response to exercise.

After eating, adipose tissue “is busy responding to the meal and a bout of exercise at this time will not stimulate the same (beneficial) changes in adipose tissue”, explained corresponding author of the study Dylan Thompson from University of Bath in Britain.

“This means that exercise in a fasted state might provoke more favourable changes in adipose tissue, and this could be beneficial for health in the long term,” Thompson added.

“We propose that feeding is likely to blunt long-term adipose tissue adaptation to regular exercise,” the researchers noted in the study published in the American Journal of Physiology — Endocrinology and Metabolism.

The study participants were a group of overweight males who walked for 60 minutes at 60 per cent maximum oxygen consumption on an empty stomach and, on another occasion, two hours after consuming a high-calorie carbohydrate-rich breakfast.

The research team took multiple blood samples after eating or fasting and after exercising.

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Representational image. Pixabay

The researchers also collected fat tissue samples immediately before and one hour after walking.

Gene expression in the adipose tissue differed significantly in the two trials.

The expression of two genes, PDK4 and HSL, increased when the men fasted and exercised and decreased when they ate before exercising.

The rise in PDK4 likely indicates that stored fat was used to fuel metabolism during exercise instead of carbohydrates from the recent meal.

Also Read: Even Light Exercises Have Health Benefits

HSL typically increases when adipose tissue uses stored energy to support increased activity, such as during exercise, Thompson said.

These results reinforce the view that “adipose tissue often faces competing challenges,” Thompson wrote.

“This is the first study to show that feeding prior to acute exercise affects post-exercise adipose tissue gene expression,” the study said. (Bollywood Country)