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Celebrating Food: 3-day-Culinary Festival begins in Gurugram

The visitors had an opportunity not only to learn from some of the leading chefs but also interact with them informally and perhaps learn a secret or two about their favourite delicacies

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Delicious Food, Pixabay

Gurugram, Feb 11, 2017: In a celebration of food with activities ranging from chefs demos and mixology sessions to Chefs workshops and a gourmet market, the NCR’s much-loved food destination, DLF Cyber Hub in Gurugram, saw the kickstart of a three-day culinary festival on Friday.

The Gourmet High Street is an international platform exhibiting every aspect of food, and the best platform to learn, explore and indulge.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram. 

On Friday, visitors participated in activities like Culinary Grind and Cooking Studio. The presence of leading chefs like Thomas Blanchard, Amrita Raichand, Sanjeev Kapoor, Tanveer Kwatra, Sarah Todd and Saransh Goila was an icing on the cake.

In the Culinary Grind session, visitors witnessed a live cooking demo by the chefs and Cooking Studio took this experience to the next level as it offered a chance to learn cooking techniques from the masters in person.

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The visitors had an opportunity not only to learn from some of the leading chefs but also interact with them informally and perhaps learn a secret or two about their favourite delicacies.

Complementing the taste buds was live entertainment by bands like Panic, The Evening Jammers and That’s What She Says.

“The Gourmet High Street is one of the rare festivals where people not only eat and drink, but also get ample opportunities to learn about the nuances of food that interest them. In addition, one also gets to interact with and get inspired by leading celebrity chefs, mixologists and sommeliers.

“Our this venue Cyber Hub is already a crowd puller for the pleasing number of eating options it offers. We are excited to host the festival at a destination which is a food lover’s paradise,” said Kavneet Sahni, Founder, The Gourmet High Street.

The three-day long festival concludes on February 12. (IANS)

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Wondering What to Serve Your Guests This Diwali? Try These Easy Snacks Recipes By Sanjeev Kapoor

Sanjeev Kapoor's recipes are not just easy to make, but also come handy to treat all your guests to the best food ever!

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With Diwali right around the corner, are you planning to experiment with some new recipes? Pixabay

New Delhi, October 11, 2017 : Traditional sweets and snacks are of the essence when it comes to Diwali and the celebrations are simply incomplete without home-cooked food. This time celebrate the festival by indulging in some sweet as well as tangy treats.

If you have even the slightest interest in culinary arts, you would have heard the name of India’s culinary expert, chef Sanjeev Kapoor! His recipes are not just easy to make, but also come handy to treat all your guests to the best food ever!

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India’s culinary expert Sanjeev Kapoor. IANS

Here are some easy snacks recipes by Chef Sanjeev Kapoor.

1. Bhajanee chakli

Ingredients :

  • 2 tablespoons Nutralite
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 teaspoon red chilli powder
  • Oil for deep-frying
  • Bhajanee flour
  • 4 cups rice
  • 1 cup skinless split black gram (urad dal)

How to make Bhajanee chakli :

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Chakli. Wikimedia

  • For the bhajanee flour, dry-roast the rice and black gram separately. Cool completely and grind separately to a powder. Sift both the flours and mix.
  • Put bhajanee flour in a bowl. Add Nutralite, salt, cumin powder and chilli powder, and mix well. Divide the mixture in half. Take one half and knead into a soft dough with ½ cup water. When the dough is used up, make a dough of the remaining flour.
  • Put small portions of the mixture into a chakli mould and press out several chakli onto a plastic sheet. Heat sufficient oil in a non-stick kadai till moderately hot.
  • Deep-fry the chakli till light golden brown and crisp. Drain on absorbent paper and set aside to cool. Store in an airtight container.

ALSO READ Diwali Sweet Dish: Now Make Desserts for Diwali in Less Than 10 Minutes

2. Methi mathri

Ingredients :

  • 2 cups refined flour (maida)
  • Salt to taste
  • ½ teaspoon carom seeds (ajwain)
  • 1 tablespoon dried fenugreek leaves (kasoori methi)
  • 5 tablespoons Nutralite
  • Oil for deep-frying

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Mathri infused with kasoori methi. Wikimedia

How to make methi mathri :

  • Take flour in a bowl, add salt, carom seeds and dried fenugreek leaves and mix well.
  • Add Nutralite and mix well. Add sufficient chilled water and knead into a hard dough. Cover and rest the dough for 15 minutes.
  • Divide into 24 equal balls and flatten them slightly. Roll them out thinly into small puris and fold in half and then fold again to make a triangle. Stick a clove at one corner making it appear like a paan. Lightly prick them with a fork so that the mathris do not rise like puris.
  • Heat sufficient oil in a kadai.
  • Slide in the mathris and deep-fry on medium heat till golden brown and crisp. Drain on absorbent paper and cool completely. Serve or store in air tight tins.

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Treat your guests to a combination of Indian sweets and snacks. Pixabay

3. Chocolate and nut karanji

Ingredients 

  • 1½ cups refined flour (maida)
  • 3 tablespoons pure ghee
  • Oil for deep-frying
  • Stuffing
  • ½ cup grated dark chocolate
  • ¼ cup chopped almonds
  • ¼ cup chopped walnuts
  • ½ cup grated mawa/khoya
  • 2 tablespoons Sugar Free

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Karanji filled with chocolate and nuts. Wikimedia commons

Method of preparation:

  • Put the flour in a deep bowl. Add ghee and add 2-3 tablespoons of chilled water or chilled milk. Knead into a medium-soft dough, adding more chilled water or milk as you go along. Divide into small balls and let them rest, covered with a damp cloth.
  • To make the stuffing, mix the khoya/mawa, Sugar Free, walnuts, almonds and chocolate in a bowl. Chill it in the refrigerator for about 10 minutes. Roll out the dough balls into small round puri. Place a puri on the worktop; moisten its edges.
  • Place some stuffing in the centre and fold one side of the puri over the other. Press the edges to seal and further twist the edges with your finger tips in a decorative manner. Or cut the edges with a serrated cutter. You can also make the karanji using a mould.
  • Keep the karanji in the refrigerator for 30-40 minutes.
  • Heat sufficient oil in a kadai. Deep-fry the karanjis, a few at a time, till light brown. Drain on absorbent paper. Serve hot or allow them to cool to room temperature and store in an airtight container.

4. Banana halwa burfi

Ingredients: 

  • cup chopped ripe Nendrabale bananas
  • 1 cup grated khoya/mawa
  • ½ cup Sugar Free
  • ½ cup coarsely ground cashew nuts
  • Ghee for greasing
  • ¼ cup milk

Method of preparation:

  • Grease a straight-sided shallow tray with a little ghee. Heat a non-stick pan, add bananas and khoya/mawa and cook on medium heat, stirring at regular intervals to prevent the mixture from scorching.
  • Cook till the ghee begins to ooze from the mixture. Add the Sugar Free and cashew nut powder, and mix. Continue to cook, stirring continuously, till the mixture turns a rich brown.
  • Add milk and cook till it starts leaving the sides of the pan. Pour the mixture into the greased tray, level the surface and set aside to cool.
  • Cut into desired shapes and serve.

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Lip-smacking banana barfi. Wikimedia

In case you liked these recipes, dont forget to share your views with us. We would also like to hear how you modified these recipes to make something unique. Share your own recipes with us! (IANS)

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Chef Sanjeev Kapoor Brand Ambassador for Food Street at World Food India event

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World Food India Ambassador
Sanjeev Kapoor. Pixabay

New Delhi, Sep 21, 2017: Popular chef Sanjeev Kapoor on Wednesday was named brand ambassador for Food Street, a curated food experience zone at the forthcoming World Food India event.

World Food India is a three-day mega international event covering the entire food processing value chain.

Food Street, being held by Ministry of Food Processing Industry, will be hosted for the first time in India from November 3, a statement said.

The experiential platform will celebrate and bring together culinary practices, flavours and fragrances from cuisines across the world, and Indian elements to create fusion food.

Also Read: Offbeat Blend of Food and Ambiance: Know About These Weirdest Restaurants Here! 

“I am honoured to be associated with a platform such as Food Street that celebrates food as a means of bringing together cultures, heritage and business… I am excited to be a part of an event of this stature and scale, being hosted for the first time in India, that is sure to delight every foodie’s palate,” Kapoor said.

To this, Union Food Processing Industries Minister Harsimrat Kaur Badal added: “We want to curate a platform that not only celebrates food and cultural diversity, but also provides an avenue for countries and entrepreneurs to collaborate and interact for new business opportunities.”

Food Street will also provide an opportunity to generate new product development initiatives and drive business for budding entrepreneurs. It is also aimed at building a sustainable agri-business where the attendees will get to know about the process of organic farming and the plethora of opportunities it holds in trade.

The sessions will also involve panel discussions among experts to discuss the future of super-foods and organic farming. (IANS)

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“Regionality is What Sets Indian Food Apart” from the Cuisines Across the World, says MasterChef Australia Judge Gary Mehigan

Gary Mehigan carries back inspiration from India to his kitchen from his each visit

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MasterChef Australia Judge Gary Mehigan
MasterChef Australia Judge Gary Mehigan. Twitter
  • Gary Mehigan said that Indian food is gaining deserved attention globally
  • We have many Indian chefs like Manish Mehrotra, Sanjeev Kapoor
  • The Chef expressed that food the world over has seen enormous changes driven by social media

August 27, 2017: Globally renowned English-Australian chef, television show host and restaurateur Gary Mehigan says he believes that “regionality is what sets Indian food apart” from the cuisines across the world.

In an email interview with IANS from Melbourne, Mehigan said that Indian food is gaining deserved attention globally. “We’re close to seeing India explore its intellectual property, namely food, properly. We have many Indian chefs like Manish Mehrotra, Sanjeev Kapoor and many other names from all over the world infiltrating the food scene in a big way.”

 “People still sometimes see Indian food as a homogeneous chicken tikka, rogan josh, chicken vindaloo cuisine, when we know it is far from the truth. Regionality is what sets Indian food apart. Regionality is what the world is going to appreciate when it starts to learn about Indian food,” Mehigan explained.

“I hope I’m a part of those who bring great Indian food to Australia,” said the chef, who is now the face of Fox Life’s “Food @ 9: India Special with Gary Mehigan”.

“There’s quite a bit of Australian talent we’re trying to showcase through the series. These shows get addictive and help us travel vicariously through our television sets,” he stated.

ALSO READ: Indulge in Gluttony: 14 Surprising Facts that you never knew about Indian Food!

Mehigan, who will be setting foot in India for the seventh time this November, said he carries back inspiration from the country to his kitchen from each visit.

“I love the country – something about the color, the chaos, the diversity and the originality of the food, it all gets under your skin. I carry home a few recipes and ideas each time I visit. It’s certainly changed the way I cook at home,” he said.

Known popularly for shows like “Far Flung with Gary Mehigan”, and for his presence as a judge on “MasterChef Australia”, the Chef expressed that food the world over has seen enormous changes driven by social media.

“I’m loving where food is at the moment. Ideas are being shared so quickly through social media — whether it’s Instagram, Twitter or Facebook. I can browse through my Instagram and look at what some of my most favorite restaurants in the world are serving for lunch.

“The frame of reference for younger cooks is much bigger. They are able to browse through how a matcha ice-cream is made in Tokyo, or how funky desserts are made in Parisian cafes,” Mehigan said.

All in all, it’s a great thing for food with awareness growing, he opined. “This global club of foodies is only expanding. It’s a great thing for food, our health, and our planet too if we care about where our food comes from.”

Social media is also one of his ways to keep reinventing his food, said the chef, who has been in the industry for nearly three decades.

“Social media is there to keep my imagination going. I’m food obsessed. I go on holidays because of food. I think I’ve never been in love with food more than I am now,” Mehigan said, signing off. (IANS)