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Central Ground Water Board Report: 56 per cent wells show decline in ground-water levels

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

The shallow state of ground-water in India has been frequently highlighted by various studies. This time, The Central Ground Water Board(CGWB) has brought forward another starkling revelation: more than 55 per cent of the wells are showing decline in ground-water level in various parts of the country.

“As per the latest ground water monitoring data of CGWB for pre-monsoon 2014, compared with decadal mean of pre-monsoon (2004-2013), around 39% of the wells are showing decline in ground-water level in various parts of the Country”, said Union Minister of State for Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation, Prof. Sanwar Lal Jat.

“India receives an average rainfall of about 1170 mm which corresponds to an annual precipitation of about 4000 BCM(Billion Cubic Metre) including snowfall. However, there is considerable variation in rainfall both temporally and spatially. Nearly 75% of this i.e., 3000 BCM occurs during the monsoon season confined to 3 to 4 month (June to September) in a year,” he further added.

Jat further explained the quantum of usable water and said, “After accounting for evaporation the average annual water availability in the country has been assessed as 1869 BCM. It has been estimated that owing to topographic, hydrological and other constraints, the utilizable water is 1123 BCM which comprises of 690 BCM of surface water 433 BCM of replenishable ground-water resources. As per latest assessment made by the CWC in 2010, the live storage capacity of completed projects is 253.388 BCM.”

According to another assessment conducted by CPCB in 2015, the sewage generation capacity for Urban Population of India for the year is estimated to be 62,000 MLD against sewage treatment capacity of 23,277 MLD with 816 STPs (Sewage Treatment Plants).

“The works under ‘National Ganga River Basin Authority’ (NGRBA) Programme include laying of sewerage system, sewage treatment plants, solid waste management, common effluent treatment plant for controlling industrial pollution, river front management, crematoria etc,” Jat concluded.

Next Story

Here’s Why Shaking Head To Remove Water From Ears Can Cause Brain Damage

The research mainly focuses on the acceleration required to get the water out of the ear canal

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Brain Damage
Researchers at Cornell University and Virginia Tech in US, revealed that shaking the head to free trapped water can cause Brain Damage. Pixabay

Shaking head is one of the most common methods people use to get rid of water in their ears, but it can can also cause complications as Researchers have found that trapped water in the ear canals can cause infection and Brain Damage.

Researchers at Cornell University and Virginia Tech in US, revealed that shaking the head to free trapped water can cause brain damage in small children.

“Our research mainly focuses on the acceleration required to get the water out of the ear canal,” said Indian-origin researcher and study author Anuj Baskota from Cornell University.

“The critical acceleration that we obtained experimentally on glass tubes and 3D printed ear canals was around the range of 10 times the force of gravity for infant ear sizes, which could cause damage to the brain,” Baskota said.

For adults, the acceleration was lower due to the larger diameter of the ear canals. They said the overall volume and position of the water in the canal changes the acceleration needed to remove it.

“From our experiments and theoretical model, we figured out that surface tension of the fluid is one of the crucial factors promoting the water to get stuck in ear canals,” said Baskota.

Brain Damage
Shaking head is one of the most common methods people use to get rid of water in their ears, but it can can also cause complications as researchers have found that trapped water in the ear canals can cause infection and Brain Damage. Pixabay

Luckily, the researchers said there is a solution that does not involve any head shaking.

“Presumably, putting a few drops of a liquid with lower surface tension than water, like alcohol or vinegar, in the ear would reduce the surface tension force allowing the water to flow out,” Baskota said.

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The study was presented at the American Physical Society’s Division of Fluid Dynamics 72nd Annual Meeting on November 23 in Washington State Convention Center in Seattle, US. (IANS)