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Child abuse in India: Are existing solutions any good?

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By Swati Gilotra

New Delhi: According to “2007 Study on child abuse: A report by Ministry of Women and Child Development (Govt. of India)”, 53.22% children in India faced one or more forms of sexual abuse and two out of every three children is being physically abused. The report indicates that 50.2% children worked seven days a week. Adding salt to the festering wound is that out of 69% children physically abused in 13 sample states, 54.68% were boys. While equal percentage of both girls and boys reported emotional abuse, 48.4% of girls wished they were boys.

We need to think on the issue that if these girls had been boys, would their problem not exist at all? Considering the almost equal percentage of children being abused, would it be easier for girls if they were boys or vice-versa? Or, is this problem penetrating deep into the psyche of the child where she cannot think about another or, may be, a better alternative?

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Photo credit: dnaindia.com

The survey includes the definition of child abuse by World Health Organization (WHO). It revealed that although the term may be understood differently through diverse perceptions but in Indian context particularly, it includes any or all of these categories– physical, sexual, emotional abuse and neglect.

The solution which the report provides is that education can bridge the gap between their vulnerability and self-protection. Sensitization of child rights should fall in place rather than sensationalization of the issue. The children should be protected from the stigma attached to abuse and they should be prevented from being re-victimized.

These imbalances need to be addressed. Poverty alleviation schemes specifically targeting families of working children or families which both willingly or unwillingly send their children to work in order to fulfill their basic needs, should be formalized. State-level guidelines and protocols should be formulated wherein accountability on the part of government, non-government and civil society should be implemented for the rehabilitation of child domestic workers. The process of healing should make them feel empowered.

The larger, and the most important question remains: How should we deal with rehabilitation of these young children? Is just admitting them to rescue homes the best solution?

I believe better awareness, in civil society, along with proper education about the illegality and inhumaneness of the issue would be able to reduce the pain to a certain extent. This is not a sudden solution, it might take time. Accountability on the part of governments as well as NGOs would go a long way in bringing relief to these children.

These children have gone through hell and rescue homes are not great places either. The NGOs as well as such homes need to address the emotional trauma that these kids have gone through. Counseling just for the sake of it wouldn’t help these children.

Read more on this issue: Child labour: Can the ‘abused’ dream?

 

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Facebook Shares Data on Child Nudity, Terrorism, Drug Sales on Instagram

On spread of hate speech on its platforms, Facebook said it can detect such harmful content before people report it and, sometimes, before anyone sees it

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Social Media, Facebook, Authenticity, Posts
The social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple's App Store, July 30, 2019. VOA

Facebook has shared for the first time data on how it takes action against child nudity and child sexual exploitation, terrorist propaganda, illicit firearm and drug sales and suicide and self-injury on its photo-sharing app Instagram.

In Q2 2019, Facebook removed about 512,000 pieces of content related to child nudity and child sexual exploitation on Instagram.

“In Q3 (July-September period), we saw greater progress and removed 754,000 pieces of content, of which 94.6 per cent we detected proactively,” Guy Rosen, VP Integrity, said in a statement on Wednesday.

It is ironic that Instagram has also become a platform, like Facebook, for such acts.

“For child nudity and sexual exploitation of children, we made improvements to our processes for adding violations to our internal database in order to detect and remove additional instances of the same content shared on both Facebook and Instagram,” Rosen explained.

In its “Community Standards Enforcement Report, November 2019,” the social networking platform said it has been detecting and removing content associated with Al Qaeda, ISIS and their affiliates on Facebook above 99 per cent.

“The rate at which we proactively detect content affiliated with any terrorist organisation on Facebook is 98.5 per cent and on Instagram is 92.2 per cent,” informed the company.

facebook privacy
FILE – The Instagram icon is displayed on a mobile screen in Los Angeles. VOA

In the area of suicide and self-injury, Facebook took action on about 2 million pieces of content in Q2 2019.

“We saw further progress in Q3 when we removed 2.5 million pieces of content, of which 97.3 per cent we detected proactively.

“On Instagram, we saw similar progress and removed about 835,000 pieces of content in Q2 2019, of which 77.8 per cent we detected proactively, and we removed about 845,000 pieces of content in Q3 2019, of which 79.1 per cent we detected proactively,” said Rosen.

In Q3 2019, Gacebook removed about 4.4 million pieces of drug sale content. It removed about 2.3 million pieces of firearm sales content in the same period.

Also Read: Tech Giant Apple Launches its All-new 16-inch MacBook Pro

On Instagram, the company removed about 1.5 million pieces of drug sale content and 58,600 pieces of firearm sales content.

On spread of hate speech on its platforms, Facebook said it can detect such harmful content before people report it and, sometimes, before anyone sees it.

“With these evolutions in our detection systems, our proactive rate has climbed to 80 per cent, from 68 per cent in our last report, and we’ve increased the volume of content we find and remove for violating our hate speech policy,” said Rosen. (IANS)