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China shifting strategies through 2015

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New Delhi: China, world’s most populous country, scrapped its one-child policy in 2015, a year that also saw an upswing in ties with India with Prime Minister Narendra Modi visiting the country. The yuan was devalued, sending shock waves in stock markets across the world.

The country also witnessed two major tragedies when over 450 people were killed in a ship capsize in June and over 170 died in massive explosions in Tianjin city in August.

China came down heavily on the corrupt, with its crackdown seeing over 100 high-ranking officials being tried.

In a dramatic move, President Xi Jinping announced military reforms. A staggering 300,000 troops are to be cut, a move that was described as getting a step closer to China’s commitment towards peaceful development.

Parts of China and capital Beijing were left gasping as smog enveloped the region, leaving residents worried.

As the year comes to an end, China, one of the world’s biggest economies, saw an array of events.

One of the biggest developments for the country of 1.3 billion was allowing the two-child policy in an attempt to balance population development and offset the burden of an aging population.

It scrapped the one-child policy, a part of the family planning policy, introduced in the late 1970s. However, the plan will come into effect only from March 2016. It has been estimated that it would help raise the population to an estimated 1.45 billion by 2030.

On the diplomatic front, China reached out to its South Asian neighbours, including India. In February, Indian External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj visited China, paving the way for Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit.

Modi visited China in May. He started his three-day trip from Xi’an where he held summit-level talks during which the border issue, the widening trade imbalance, connectivity issues and “strengthening trust” were high on the agenda.

While in Beijing, Modi held talks with his Chinese counterpart Li Keqiang. A joint statement called for an early settlement of the boundary issue which should be pursued as a strategic objective and said that both countries were determined to actively seek a political settlement.

With India’s neighbour Pakistan, China’s relationship took a new turn with President Xi Jinping’s visit to Islamabad where he envisaged investments worth $45 billion and signed 51 agreements.

An important meeting was between President Xi and his Taiwanese counterpart Ma Ying-jeou, a first of its kind since the end of a civil war in 1949. The meeting took place in Singapore in November.

President Xi also made a state visit to the US in September where he along with his counterpart, Barack Obama, reached a consensus on cyber-security. He also visited Britain in October.

China’s strength, its economy, took a beating when the yuan was devalued on August 11.

The next day, it faced its second devaluation. These resulted in Chinese exports getting cheaper and imports into China more expensive. Stock markets around the world, including India, were hit.

This year, China has dealt sternly when it came to corruption as part of a campaign launched by President Xi when he came to power in 2013.

The low points were tragedies. The year began with a stampede at a New Year’s Eve celebration in Shanghai where 35 people were killed and over 40 injured.

On June 1, a ship with 456 people on board capsized in the Yangtze river following a tornado. A total of 442 were killed while only 12 survived. Two are still missing and presumed dead.

On August 12, a series of explosions ripped through a container storage station at Tianjin port. Fires caused by the initial explosions continued to spread uncontrollably throughout the next few days, causing eight additional explosions. It killed 173 people including firefighters, eight still remain missing and over 750 were injured.

In September, President Xi announced a cut of 300,000 troops. A round of military reshuffle in August saw the inclusion of younger officers. These changes were parallel with the military’s anti-graft campaign, which has so far removed 40 senior officers, as well as China’s increased efforts to modernise its forces.

This year, China made giant strides in science and technology. In November, the construction of the world’s largest ever radio telescope entered the final stage. China also manufactured the world’s first electric plane, started building its largest solar plant and built the world’s largest amphibious aircraft.

The Beijing residents coughed and rasped as the Chinese capital was shrouded in smog.

On the flip side, since late January, smog levels have increased at an alarming rate, prompting the government to adopt the world’s strictest emissions standards.

And, China’s campaign of island building in the South China Sea has caused concern among other regional players. China claims most of the South China and East China seas. (Karishma Saurabh Kalita, IANS)

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India China’s Fight Over the Doklam Plateau Explained

Doklam or Donglang, is a disputed area between China and Bhutan located near their tri-junction with India

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picture from- indiaopines.com

By Ruchika Verma

  • India and China have an old history of disputes
  • This time, the dispute is regarding the Dokplam Plateau
  • The area is of strategic importance for both the nations

Disputes between India and China are not at all uncommon. The rivalry between the two nations is famous. There have been several disputes between the two about the India-China border in past, and there seems to be no stopping for these disputes in the present or future, for that matter.

India and China have a n old history of repeated disputes. zeenews.india.com
India and China have a n old history of repeated disputes. zeenews.india.com

In June 2017, the world witnessed yet another dispute arising between India and China. This time the dispute was about China building a road extending to Doklam Plateau, which both nations have been fighting over for years now.

Also Read : China is likely to get involved if India disrupts $46 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor

History of the dispute 

Doklam or Donglang (in Chinese), is a disputed area between China and Bhutan located near their tri-junction with India. India doesn’t directly claim the area but supports Bhutan’s claims on it.

India fits into the picture, as this plateau is an important area for India. Not only is Bhutan one of the biggest allies of India; China gaining access over the Doklam Plateau will also endanger India’s boarders, making them vulnerable to attacks.

Dopkam plateau is an important area near India, China and Bhutan's borders.
Dopkam plateau is an important area near India, China and Bhutan’s borders.

Apart from the hostile history of the two nations, the Doklam Plateau is also important for India to maintain its control over a land corridor that connects to its remote northeastern States. China building a road through Doklam surely threatens that control.

A complete timeline of what happened in the recent Doklam Standoff 

On 16 June 2017, Chinese troops with construction vehicles and excavators began extending an existing road southward on the Doklam plateau, near India’s border. It was Bhutan which raised the alarm for India.

On 18 June 2017, India responded by sending around 270 Indian troops, with weapons and two bulldozers to evict the Chinese troops from Doklam.

On 29 June 2017, Bhutan protested against the construction of a road in the disputed territory.  According to the Bhutanese government, China attempted to extend a road in an area which is shared both Bhutan and India, along with China.

Between 30 June, 2017 and 5 July, 2017, China released multiple statements justifying their claim over the Doklam plateau. They cited reasons  as to why the Doklam standoff wasn’t really needed. And how China has not intruded into India’s territory to incite the standoff.

On 19th July, 2017, China asked India again to withrew its troops from the Doklam. On 24th July, 2017,  Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, in his statement, asked India to withdraw and behave themselves to maintain peace.

India and China seem to never agree when it comes to their borders. BBC
India and China seem to never agree when it comes to their borders. BBC

Also Read : Why India Must Counter China’s High-Altitude Land Grab ?

What followed till 16th August, 2017 was China constantly alleging India of trying to create trouble. They accused India of trying to disturb the peace and not withdrawing the troops, even after repeated reminders. They also accused India of bullying.

India, however, kept quiet during the whole fiasco, only releasing a statement regarding their stand and position at the Doklam standoff.

On 28 August 2017, India and China finally announced that they had agreed to pull their troops back from the Doklam standoff. The withdrawal was completed on that very day.

On 7 September 2017, many media reports claimed that both nation’s troops have not left the site completely. They were still patrolling the area, simply having moved 150 meters awayfrom their previous position.

On 9 October 2017, China announced that it is ready to maintain peace with India at the frontiers. India reacted in affirmative, the peace was established when Indian Defence Minister, Nirmala Sitharaman’s visited Nathu La.

The issue between the two nations may rise again. Pixabay
The issue between the two nations may rise again. Pixabay

The Doklam issue for now is resolved. However, given the history of disputes between India and China, it won’t be a surprise if the issue resurfaces again in near future.