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China, US should cooperate, not confront: China daily

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Beijing: A state-run Chinese daily confirmed what experts on ‘Sino-American bi-lateral relations‘ were telling all this while; that US and China know better than to confront each other. Contrary to the beliefs, China and US profit from symbiotic relations; and must avoid hostility in their relations, wrote the daily.

pixabay.com
pixabay.com

“Cooperation is the only option before the two,” said a state-run Chinese daily on Thursday. Both China and the US announced on Wednesday that Chinese President Xi Jinping will make a state visit to the US from September 22 to 25.

An editorial “Progression in Sino-US ties despite friction” said: “This event, even before it was officially announced, has already become one of the most anticipated on the world stage this year.”

The daily said that recently, friction between the two “over cyber security, the South China Sea, human rights and the economy has increased”.

“Some US strategists have suggested adopting tougher policies on China. Chinese society is becoming more vigilant toward the US,” it added.

The editorial said that there are major questions surrounding relations between the two countries as to “how they can remain stable when friction instantly occurs and strategic distrust lingers”.

Xi and US President Barack Obama have met several times and talked extensively. These meetings have

www.uscnpm.org
www.uscnpm.org

encouraged both countries to send goodwill to the other and emphasized the necessity and possibility of cooperation, despite disputes.

“…But the top strategic issue between the two is whether they are both willing and capable of maintaining a peaceful cooperative atmosphere. The benefits of cooperation matter to both countries and they should seek to maximize these benefits.”

The daily went on to say that “the two should be clear about the losses brought about by non-cooperation or even confrontation”.

“If these two powerful sides fall into a strategic confrontation, one would be hard-pressed to say who could be victorious, so cooperation has become the only option for the two,” it added.

On some people comparing China-US relations with ties between the US and the Soviet Union in the past, the editorial said: “…there are much more differences than similarities between the two.”

“Both know that concepts such as containment and challenge will burden bilateral ties. Their relationship should proceed with expanding communications,” it added.

With inputs from IANS

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Video- USA Gears Up For Its Midterm Elections

Trump and Obama may never appear as opposing candidates on a ballot together, but they are facing off in a closely watched proxy battle in this year’s midterm campaign.

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MIdterm Elections
Former U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Urbana, Illinois. VOA

For former U.S. president Barack Obama, it must seem like old times. Obama has started to hit the campaign trail on behalf of Democrats ahead of the November midterm elections, setting up what amounts to a proxy battle with the man who succeeded him, President Donald Trump.

Trump already has been a fixture on the campaign trail on behalf of Republicans, convinced that aggressive efforts in Republican-leaning states will protect Republican majorities in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.

Obama’s initial foray into the 2018 congressional campaign came at the University of Illinois where he urged young Democrats to keep up the fight for social and economic justice.

“Each time we have gotten closer to those ideals, somebody somewhere has pushed back,” Obama said. “It did not start with Donald Trump. He is a symptom, not the cause. He is just capitalizing on resentment that politicians have been fanning for years.”

Get out the vote

Obama also campaigned in California on behalf of several Democratic House candidates, where he urged activists to turn out and vote in November.

“When we are not participating, when we are not paying attention, when we are not stepping up, other voices fill the void,” Obama told a Democratic gathering in Anaheim. “But the good news in two months, we have a chance to restore some sanity in our politics.”

Obama now finds himself competing against the man who succeeded him, President Trump, and who has vowed to undo much of what Obama did during his presidency.

Midterm Elections
Former U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Urbana, Illinois. VOA

Touting the economy

For his part, Trump has been eager to get out on the campaign trail and has promised a vigorous effort to energize Republican voters to keep their congressional majorities in November.

“This election is about jobs. It is safety and it is jobs,” Trump said at a recent Republican rally in Billings, Montana. “Thanks to Republican leadership, our economy is booming like never before in our history. Think of it, in our history. Nobody knew this was going to happen.”

Trump also is stoking fear among his Republican supporters that a Democratic takeover of the House of Representatives in November could lead to his impeachment.

“We will worry about that if it ever happens,” he told the crowd in Billings. “But if it does happen, it is your fault because you did not go out to vote. OK? You didn’t go out to vote.”

Midterm Elections
Supporters hold signs as President Donald Trump speaks during a rally Aug. 21, 2018, in Charleston, W.Va. VOA

Referendum on Trump

Midterm elections are historically unkind to sitting presidents. But unlike many of his predecessors, Trump has embraced the notion that the November congressional vote will be a referendum on his presidency.

Political analysts said that strategy carries both risk and reward.

“The enthusiasm on both sides of the aisle is really related to the president,” said George Washington University political scientist Lara Brown. “I think the last numbers I saw were that more than 40 percent of people who said that they would be very likely to vote were going to be either voting for the president or against the president in this midterm.”

Trump and Obama already have jousted over who should get credit for the strong U.S. economy. At his rallies, Trump touts economic growth and job creation numbers since he took over the presidency, arguing that the national economy is “booming like never before.”

Obama has offered some pushback on the campaign trail.

Midterm Elections
President Donald Trump speaks at a fundraiser in Fargo, N.D. VOA

“Let’s just remember when this recovery started,” Obama said in his Illinois speech, highlighting job growth during his White House years as part of the recovery from the 2008 recession.

Head-to-head battle

Like Trump, Obama also has proved to be a lightning rod for voters. The 44th president was effective in two presidential campaigns at turning out Democrats but was a drag on the party in his two midterm elections, spurring Republicans to turn out against him.

During this year’s midterm, Obama is likely to focus on mobilizing women, younger activists and nonwhite voters, key parts of the Democratic coalition that helped him win the White House in 2008 and 2012.

Also Read: Trump Needs Obama For Dealing With North Korea, Said Jon Wolfsthal

“That enthusiasm is there throughout the Democratic Party and across demographic groups,” said Brookings Institution scholar John Hudak. “And for the first time many voters are going to see options on their ballot that look and sound and talk about issues in different ways, and that is always something that is appealing to a voter base.”

Trump and Obama may never appear as opposing candidates on a ballot together, but they are facing off in a closely watched proxy battle in this year’s midterm campaign where party control of Congress is at stake. (VOA)