Thursday April 9, 2020
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Climate change is upon us, Act now or never

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By Harshmeet Singh

Up till now, the Paris climate change summit has dominated the news stories in the month of December. All the hoopla surrounding the Paris climate change summit is completely justified considering the disastrous impact of climate change that awaits us in the future. If you are still doubtful about the gravity of the issue, the following images might help you in coming to terms with the reality.

polar bear

No image better exemplifies our gloomy future than this image of a polar bear trying to hold on to a fast melting glacier. Over the past 150 years, the average temperature of our planet has increased by 2.5 degrees, thus causing the Antarctica, Greenland and Arctic ice to melt faster than ever, which in turn raises the water levels across the world. This is specially dangerous for low-lying coastal nations which would submerge in the ocean if this trend continues.

climate change

 

drought

According to the scientists, floods and droughts are likely to increase with the increasing global temperatures. Changing patterns of rainfall, such as the one that wrecked havoc in Chennai are likely to become increasingly common.

water scarcity

The issue of fresh water scarcity is likely to assume much greater proportions in the coming years with increase in the melting rates of ice caps.

penguins

The population of polar animals such as penguins is on a constant decline. The population of Adélie penguins of Antarctica has declined to 1/3rd in the last 3 decades.

If these images aren’t enough to put across the challenge of climate change that we are up against, may be we don’t deserve the Earth after all.

Next Story

Ice Loss in Antarctica and Greenland Increasing at an Alarming Rate: Scientists

Greenland, Antarctica ice loss accelerating

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Ice loss
Earth's great ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, were now losing mass six times faster than they were in the 1990s due to warming conditions. Pixabay

Earth’s great ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, were now losing mass six times faster than they were in the 1990s due to warming conditions, the media reported on Thursday citing scientists as saying.

A comprehensive review of satellite data acquired at both poles was unequivocal in its assessment of accelerating trends, the BBC quoted the scientists as saying.

Between them, Greenland and Antarctica lost 6.4 trillion tonnes of ice in the period from 1992 to 2017.

Ice loss
The combined rate of ice loss for Greenland and Antarctica was running at about 81 billion tonnes per year in the 1990s. Pixabay

This was sufficient to push up global sea-levels up by 17.8 mm, the scientists added. “That’s not a good news story,” said Professor Andrew Shepherd from the University of Leeds.

“Today, the ice sheets contribute about a third of all sea-level rise, whereas in the 1990s, their contribution was actually pretty small at about 5 per cent. This has important implications for the future, for coastal flooding and erosion,” he told BBC News.

The researcher co-leads a project called the Ice Sheet Mass Balance Intercomparison Exercise, or Imbie, which is a team of experts who have reviewed polar measurements acquired by observational spacecraft over nearly three decades.

The Imbie team’s studies have revealed that ice losses from Antarctica and Greenland were actually heading to much more pessimistic outcomes, and will likely add another 17 cm to those end-of-century forecasts.

“If that holds true it would put 400 million people at risk of annual coastal flooding by 2100,” Professor Shepherd told the BBC.

Also Read- People of All Generation Can Feel Lonely for Different Reasons: Research

The combined rate of loss for Greenland and Antarctica was running at about 81 billion tonnes per year in the 1990s.

By the 2010s, it had climbed to 475 billion tonnes per year. (IANS)