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Climate change is upon us, Act now or never

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By Harshmeet Singh

Up till now, the Paris climate change summit has dominated the news stories in the month of December. All the hoopla surrounding the Paris climate change summit is completely justified considering the disastrous impact of climate change that awaits us in the future. If you are still doubtful about the gravity of the issue, the following images might help you in coming to terms with the reality.

polar bear

No image better exemplifies our gloomy future than this image of a polar bear trying to hold on to a fast melting glacier. Over the past 150 years, the average temperature of our planet has increased by 2.5 degrees, thus causing the Antarctica, Greenland and Arctic ice to melt faster than ever, which in turn raises the water levels across the world. This is specially dangerous for low-lying coastal nations which would submerge in the ocean if this trend continues.

climate change

 

drought

According to the scientists, floods and droughts are likely to increase with the increasing global temperatures. Changing patterns of rainfall, such as the one that wrecked havoc in Chennai are likely to become increasingly common.

water scarcity

The issue of fresh water scarcity is likely to assume much greater proportions in the coming years with increase in the melting rates of ice caps.

penguins

The population of polar animals such as penguins is on a constant decline. The population of Adélie penguins of Antarctica has declined to 1/3rd in the last 3 decades.

If these images aren’t enough to put across the challenge of climate change that we are up against, may be we don’t deserve the Earth after all.

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Women Are Rarely “Put Front And Center” At The Heart Of Climate Action

Feminism doesn't mean excluding men

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Former President of Ireland and former High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson speaks during a meeting at Associated Press headquarters, in New York, May 8, 2017.
Former President of Ireland and former High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson speaks during a meeting at Associated Press headquarters, in New York, May 8, 2017. VOA

Women must be at the heart of climate action if the world is to limit the deadly impact of disasters such as floods, former Irish president and U.N. rights commissioner Mary Robinson said on Monday.

Robinson, also a former U.N. climate envoy, said women were most adversely affected by disasters and yet are rarely “put front and center” of efforts to protect the most vulnerable.

“Climate change is a man-made problem and must have a feminist solution,” she said at a meeting of climate experts at London’s Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and Entrepreneurship.

“Feminism doesn’t mean excluding men, it’s about being more inclusive of women and – in this case – acknowledging the role they can play in tackling climate change.”

Research has shown that women’s vulnerabilities are exposed during the chaos of cyclones, earthquakes and floods, according to the British think-tank Overseas Development Institute.

In many developing countries, for example, women are involved in food production, but are not allowed to manage the cash earned by selling their crops, said Robinson.

Earth depletion
Earth depletion, Pixabay

The lack of access to financial resources can hamper their ability to cope with extreme weather, she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation on the sidelines of the event.

“Women all over the world are … on the front lines of the fall-out from climate change and therefore on the forefront of climate action,” said Natalie Samarasinghe, executive director of Britain’s United Nations Association.

“What we — the international community — need to do is talk to them, learn from them and support them in scaling up what they know works best in their communities,” she said at the meeting.

Also read: Climate change can have an effect on the taste of the wines

Robinson served as Irish president from 1990-1997 before taking over as the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, and now leads a foundation devoted to climate justice. (VOA)