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Climate change will proceed faster than expected: Study

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London: Because increased temperature also affects greenhouse gas emissions that arise naturally, global warming will progress faster than what was previously believed, projects a new study.

The findings suggest a vicious circle of greenhouse gas emissions from the burning of fossil fuels lead to higher temperatures, which in turn lead to increased natural emissions and further warming.

This means that warming will be faster than expected from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions alone, the researchers noted.

“We are not talking about hypotheses anymore. The evidence is growing and the results of the detailed studies are surprisingly clear. The question is no longer if the natural emissions will increase but rather how much they will increase with warming,” said one of the researchers David Bastviken, a professor at Linkoping University in Sweden.

The researchers examined the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane from three lakes.

The effects were clear and the methane emissions increased exponentially with temperature.

Their measurements showed that a temperature increase from 15 to 20 degrees Celsius almost doubled the methane level.

“Everything indicates that global warming caused by humans leads to increased natural greenhouse gas emissions. Our detailed measurements reveal a clear pattern of greater methane emissions from lakes at higher temperatures,” study lead author Sivakiruthika Natchimuthu from Linkoping University pointed out.

The findings were published in the journal Limnology and Oceanography.

(IANS)

(Picture credit:uswateralliance.org)

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New Species of Soil Bacteria Can Fight Soil Pollutants

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Soil bacteria
Researchers have found a new species of soil bacteria that is particularly adept at breaking down organic matter. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Researchers have found a new species of soil bacteria that is particularly adept at breaking down organic matter, including the cancer-causing chemicals that are released when coal, gas, oil and refuse are burned.

The newly discovered bacteria belong to the genus Paraburkholderia madseniana, which are known for their ability to degrade aromatic compounds and, in some species, the capacity to form root nodules that fix atmospheric nitrogen.

According to the study, researchers at Cornell University in the US with colleagues from Lycoming College described the new bacterium in a paper published in the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology.

Soil bacteria
The bacteria has the capacity to form root nodules that fix atmospheric nitrogen in the soil. (Representational Image). Pixabay

The first step was sequencing the bacterium’s ribosomal RNA genes, which provided genetic evidence that madseniana was a unique species.

In studying the new bacteria, the researchers noticed that madseniana is especially adept at breaking down aromatic hydrocarbons, which make up lignin, a major component of plant biomass and soil organic matter.

According to the researchers, aromatic hydrocarbons are also found in toxic PAH pollution.

This means that the newly identified bacteria could be a candidate for biodegradation research and an important player in the soil carbon cycle.

In the case of madseniana, Buckley’s lab wants to learn more about the symbiotic relationship between the bacteria and forest trees.

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Initial research suggests that trees feed carbon to the bacteria, and in turn the bacteria degrade soil organic matter, thereby releasing nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus for the trees.

Understanding how bacteria break down carbon in soil could hold the key to the sustainability of the land and the ability to predict the future of global climate, the researchers said. (IANS)