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Coca-Cola, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) to train 50,000 Vendors in serving Safe and Hygienic Street Food

The move was also touted as a step in the direction of the central government’s flagship Skill India programme

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Street Food in India, Wikimedia
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New Delhi, March 27, 2017: The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) and Coca-Cola joined hands on Monday to train over 50,000 small-time street food vendors in hygiene and health-related aspects of food selling, starting from April.

The Coca-Cola India (CCI) and the FSSAI will, under the latter’s “Safe and Nutritious Food – A Shared Responsibility” theme, will provide training to the street food vendors, starting with Ludhiana in Punjab before moving on to other states.

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The move was also touted as a step in the direction of the central government’s flagship Skill India programme.

Speaking on the occasion, Venkatesh Kini, President, Coca-Cola India and South West Asia, said: “Coca-Cola India is enthusiastic about partnering with FSSAI to make a significant contribution to improving the lives of the vendors and also enhancing the eating out experience for consumers. Coca-Cola India has already taken several steps towards skill enhancement, both in social as well as sporting arenas under Skill India.”

This is not the first time that the American soft drink-maker would be launching such a training drive. “Parivartan”, its flagship initiative, is in its 10th year and was launched well before the company came up with any Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) scheme.

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“Coca-Cola India has been training ‘kirana’ (provisions) retailers for the past ten years under their flagship retailer training initiative – Parivartan. This collaboration with FSSAI provides an opportunity and broadens the horizons of Coca-Cola’s Parivartan initiative,” Kini said.

The training would be completely bona fide and there would be no compulsion to stock or sell their products, he added.

The FSSAI, which has also been training street vendors for years, has run such initiatives in Delhi and other states with help of the National Association of Street Vendors of India. During its previous campaigns, it was able to train 20,000 such vendors.

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“The idea this time is to touch the lives of every Indian, wherever he may be living, and help him get the cleanest possible food,” FSSAI CEO Pawan Aggarwal said at the event.

The training will include screening of audio-visual material and acquainting vendors on managing inventory, stock, and how to keep the water from getting contaminated further, keeping in view the role of infected water as the cause of most diseases. (IANS)

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Biggest Ocean Polluters Named to be Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Nestle: Study

Eighty per cent of the 8.3 billion metric tonnes of plastic produced since 1950 was still present in the environment, mainly in the oceans.

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Ocean , Wikimedia

Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Nestle are among the companies that contribute most to ocean pollution with single-use plastics, according to a study presented on Tuesday by the “Break Free from Plastic” initiative.

The environmental movement, launched in 2016, has helped clear the coasts of 42 countries around the world of discarded plastics.

“These brand audits offer undeniable proof of the role that corporations play in perpetuating the global plastic pollution crisis,” said Von Hernandez, the Global Coordinator of Break Free From Plastic, at the presentation of the study in Manila.

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Plastic pollution, Pixabay

Between September 9 and 15, over 10,000 volunteers carried out 239 plastic cleaning actions on coasts and other natural environments in 42 countries, Efe news reported.

They collected more than 187,000 pieces of plastic, of which more than 65 per cent were from products by Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Nestle. But companies such as Danone, Mondelez, Procter & Gamble, and Unilever, among others, were also mentioned in the report.

“The companies have a choice to make. They can be part of the problem or they can be part of the solution”, Hernandez told Efe.

“If they continue the use of problematic and unnecessary plastic packaging they are just encouraging more production and more pollution”.

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Coca Cola is known to spend a huge amount of money on its advertisement campaigns. Wikimedia Common

Around 100,000 pieces of plastic collected were made of materials like polystyrene, PVC (polyvinyl chloride), PET (polyethylene terephthalate) or the film of single-use plastic that were not biodegradable, the report said.

Plastic production has reached 320 million metric tonnes per year and is expected to grow by 40 per cent over the next decade, which will exponentially increase the release of greenhouse gases. Ninety per cent of plastics are produced from fossil fuels and pollutants.

“We must act now to demand that corporate brands reject their overpackaging habit in order to meaningfully reverse the demand for new plastic,” said Hernandez.

The study said that these large corporations must take responsibility for polluting the environment, as production of plastics exposes harmful substances to communities living near factories and pollutes foods and products contained in plastic wraps.

Also Read: Use Every Resources To Help in Climate Change: Scientists

Eighty per cent of the 8.3 billion metric tonnes of plastic produced since 1950 was still present in the environment, mainly in the oceans, according to studies cited in the “Break Free From Plastic” report.

Since then, only 9 per cent of that plastic had been properly recycled and 12 per cent incinerated. (IANS)