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‘Corrupt officers cannot alter true color of People’s Liberation Army’

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061116-M-9827H-129 Zhanjiang, People’s Republic of China (Nov. 16, 2006) - Marines of the People’s Liberation Army (Navy) (PLA(N)) stand at attention as Commander, Pacific Fleet Rear Adm. Gary Roughead greets them following a demonstration of the brigade’s capabilities. Roughead’s visit to Zhanjiang coincides with the port visit of USS Juneau (LPD 10), which will conduct a search and rescue exercise (SAREX) with PLA(N) assets after the visit. Roughead and Chinese leaders feel the visit and ensuing SAREX will promote mutual understanding, transparency and cooperation between both navies and nations. U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. J.J. Harper
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Cleared for release by Joint Staff Public Affairs

Beijing: A handful of corrupt officers cannot alter the “true color” of the People’s Liberation Army, a PLA daily commentary said on Monday.

The commentary came days after the announcement of an investigation into Guo Boxiong, former vice chairman of the central military commission.

Guo has been expelled from the Communist Party of China and his corruption case has been transferred to military prosecutors, according to Xinhua news agency.

The commentary said the people will neither dismiss the achievements nor the good image of the PLA just because of a few isolated cases.

“The PLA, after removing its own tumour, will become healthier,” it said.

“An army adept at self-purifying and self-reforming, and an army that dares to rise above the ashes will live up to people’s expectations,” the commentary said.

A history of more than eight decades has proved that the PLA has always been trusted by the party and the people.

The commentary urged service men and women not to be distracted, but to concentrate their energy and efforts on building a strong military, and on maintaining a high degree of stability and solidarity in the military.

(IANS)

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Shanghai Airport Gets Check-In With Facial Recognition Machines

Increased convenience may come at a cost in a country with few rules on how the government can use biometric data.

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Shanghai,
A U.S. Customs and Border Protection facial recognition device is ready to scan another passenger at a United Airlines gate. VOA

It’s now possible to check in automatically at Shanghai Hongqiao airport using facial recognition technology, part of an ambitious rollout of facial recognition systems in China that has raised privacy concerns as Beijing pushes to become a global leader in the field.

Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport unveiled self-service kiosks for flight and baggage check-in, security clearance and boarding powered by facial recognition technology, according to the Civil Aviation Administration of China.

Similar efforts are under way at airports in Beijing and Nanyang city, in central China’s Henan province.

Shanghai,
Face recognition tool was first launched in 2012

Many airports in China already use facial recognition to help speed security checks, but Shanghai’s system, which debuted Monday, is being billed as the first to be fully automated.

“It is the first time in China to achieve self-service for the whole check-in process,” said Zhang Zheng, general manager of the ground services department for Spring Airlines, the first airline to adopt the system at Hongqiao airport. Currently, only Chinese identity card holders can use the technology.

Spring Airlines, Shanghai said Tuesday that passengers had embraced automated check-in, with 87 percent of 5,017 people who took Spring flights on Monday using the self-service kiosks, which can cut down check-in times to less than a minute and a half.

Shanghai,
Rana el Kaliouby, CEO of the Boston-based artificial intelligence firm Affectiva, demonstrates the company’s facial recognition technology, in Boston, April 23, 2018. VOA

Across greater China, facial recognition is finding its way into daily life. Mainland police have used facial recognition systems to identify people of interest in crowds and nab jaywalkers, and are working to develop an integrated national system of surveillance camera data.

Chinese media are filled with reports of ever-expanding applications: A KFC outlet in Hangzhou, near Shanghai, where it’s possible to pay using facial recognition technology; a school that uses facial recognition cameras to monitor students’ reactions in class; and hundreds of ATMs in Macau equipped with facial recognition devices to curb money laundering.

Also Read: Facial Recognition Technology Catches A Person With Fake Passpost At The US Airport 

But increased convenience may come at a cost in a country with few rules on how the government can use biometric data.

“Authorities are using biometric and artificial intelligence to record and track people for social control purposes,” said Maya Wang, senior China researcher for Human Rights Watch. “We are concerned about the increasing integration and use of facial recognition technologies throughout the country because it provides more and more data points for the authorities to track people.” (VOA)