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DACA is a Bold Welcome Step by President Trump

Stand for immigrants! But, please stand for legal immigrants, not fence crossers!

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Protest against Ending the DACA
Supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA chant slogans and hold signs while joining a Labor Day rally in downtown Los Angeles on Sept. 4, 2017.VOA

I congratulate President Trump for taking the bold decision to end DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals).

President Obama had introduced DACA under which kids brought illegally in the USA did not have to worry about deportation. DACA allowed these otherwise undocumented children to stay on and even get jobs. Now, since DACA has been rescinded by President Trump, it is estimated that 800,000 such beneficiaries risk being declared illegal and deported. However, it may be noted that Trump has asked Congress to legislate this issue and in effect has opened the possibility of finding some alternative solution.

The immigration system is in shambles in this country.  Millions of law abiding immigrants who enter the country with proper documents have to wait for painful long years to acquire the permanent residency (Green Card). Why? Because the immigration system is lethargic, inefficient and poorly funded. Also, legal immigrants do not constitute a big vote bank: after all educated, law abiding people do not turn into herds, flocks and tribes to demand swifter justice! Why would they? Also, the immigration policy is extremely biased and compartmentalizes people of different nationalities (thus,  legal immigrants from Europe (read the White) do not have to stand in long line (in other words, their Priority Date (PD) is typically always Current), but people from China, India have to wait for excruciatingly long years to get their Green Card (those who think India alone has social injustice in form of caste-based reservation where ‘castocracy’ trumps meritocracy, think twice! USA has a nationality-based reservation!).

No one talks about fixing the broken immigration system. The liberal media in the USA seems to have a permanent amnesia towards this issue. But, talk about illegal (undocumented workers) and the Democrats and liberal (I call them pseudo-liberal) media would erupt into an uproar. Obama had 8 full years to turn the monstrous immigration system into a vehicle of justice, equality, and the land of law. But, his priorities were elsewhere. The one thing Obama did not forget was to announce Amnesty for the illegal announcement. Amnesty is like awarding a lotto: in a single swift shot, overnight an illegally staying person in the USA becomes legal. What a joke! And, also, it is a slap on law abiding people who enter the country to make American dream true. A just society does not reward illegal immigrants with jackpots (read Amnesty), while legal immigrants continue to languish in the hope of getting their Green Cards!

Let us not forget DACA was the brain child of Obama only.

It is ludicrous to see Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Microsoft and other silicon valley companies raising a hue and cry about the death of DACA. All along these years, they should have lobbied hard for strengthening H1B visa program so that skillful professionals could come more easily to the US and contribute to the innovation and enterprise.

And one more point: Why is there an impression that Latinos come out openly in support of illegal immigrants? It is one thing if crowds come out and protest AGAINST illegal immigration. But perplexingly enough, human right advocates, liberal groups never tire out taking to the streets to support undocumented workers.

An illegal is illegal. S(he) is taking away space for a rightful person.

Stand for immigrants! But, please stand for legal immigrants, not fence crossers!

The author is the Editor-in-Chief of NewsGram. Twitter @drMunishRaizada

 

 

 

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Trump Calls For Deporting Illegal Immigrants With No Court Hearings

"Democrats, fix the laws. Don’t RESIST," Trump said

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Migrants seeking to enter the United States
Migrants seeking to enter the United States. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump called Sunday for immediately deporting illegal immigrants entering the United States with “no Judges or Court Cases.”

In a string of Twitter comments, Trump declared, “We cannot allow all of these people to invade our Country…,” contending that “Our system is a mockery to good immigration policy and Law and Order.”

The U.S. leader claimed that the U.S. immigration law is “laughed at all over the world, is very unfair to all of those people who have gone through the system legally and are waiting on line for years.”

The United States for years has granted court hearings to migrants fleeing from Mexico and Central American countries, and from elsewhere in the world, and looking for better economic fortunes in the United States.

Trump’s tough demand to end that legal process would face stiff opposition in Congress, which for years has been stalemated on changes to U.S. immigration policies and unable to enact new migration laws.

He said, “When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came.”

He renewed his demand that “Immigration must be based on merit – we need people who will help to Make America Great Again!”

President Donald Trump speaks about immigration alongside family members affected by crimes committed by undocumented immigrants, at the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, June 22, 2018, in Washington
President Donald Trump speaks about immigration alongside family members affected by crimes committed by undocumented immigrants, at the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, June 22, 2018, in Washington, VOA

Earlier, Trump again blamed opposition Democrats for the impasse over U.S. immigration policies

“Democrats, fix the laws. Don’t RESIST,” Trump said on Twitter. He declared that his administration is “doing a far better job” than that of former presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama in controlling illegal immigration, “but we need strength and security at the Border! Cannot accept all of the people trying to break into our Country. Strong Borders, No Crime!”

Republican Senator Ron Johnson, chairman of the Senate Homeland Security Committee, told CNN, “This is a mess that goes back decades. We don’t have the capacity to handle all the migrants showing up” at the U.S. border.

The Republican-controlled House of Representatives is still planning to vote this week on comprehensive immigration policy changes after last week defeating a tougher version of new immigration controls.

Trump supported both of the bills being considered by the House, but then said Republican lawmakers were wasting their time and should abandon the effort until after the November elections in hopes that Republicans would increase the majorities they hold in both chambers and would have an easier time passing immigration policy changes to their liking.

Also read:Why Does Trump Separate Families, A Policy Or A Law? 

Democrats, however, have hopes of retaking control of at least one of the chambers, with U.S. analysts say they have a better chance of regaining control of the House, where all 435 seats are being contested. (VOA)

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American Parents Sue The Government Over Family Separation Policy

The administration says it is forging ahead with plans to reunite the parents

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A protester holds a sign outside a closed gate at the Port of Entry facility, June 21, 2018, in Fabens, Texas, where tent shelters are being used to house separated family members
A protester holds a sign outside a closed gate at the Port of Entry facility, June 21, 2018, in Fabens, Texas, where tent shelters are being used to house separated family members, VOA

Among the parents of more than 2,300 separated migrant children, three Central American parents sued the U.S. government over its policy of family separations Wednesday, the day U.S. President Donald Trump, under intense public pressure, ordered an end to the practice.

But three days later, their situation had not changed and they’re “desperate” for information about the whereabouts and well-being of their children, their lawyer said.

“Our clients are being held in detention facilities with no access to information about their children,” said Jerome Wesevich, an attorney with Texas RioGrande Legal Aid in Brownsville, Texas. “The government has some procedures in place for supplying information. So far those have been entirely inadequate.”

The administration says it is forging ahead with plans to reunite the parents with the thousands of children separated since early May when officials announced a “zero tolerance policy” on illegal entry into the United States.

People participate in a protest against recent U.S. immigration policy that separates children from their families when they enter the United States as undocumented immigrants, in front of a Homeland Security facility in Elizabeth, New Jersey, June 17, 2018.
People participate in a protest against recent U.S. immigration policy that separates children from their families when they enter the United States as undocumented immigrants, in front of a Homeland Security facility in Elizabeth, New Jersey, June 17, 2018. VOA

Some families reunited

Late Friday, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said it had reunited about 500 families, saying “all unaccompanied children in their custody” had been reunited with their families.

But the status of many more transferred out of CBP custody remains uncertain. Wesevich said the uncertainty has left the migrant parents in the dark.

“I’d say there is not a lot of optimism,” Wesevich said. “The president’s announcement is not very understandable about what it’s going to mean in practical terms.”

Meanwhile, legal assistance organizations are trying to locate migrant families caught up in the confusion and chaos that followed Trump’s order.

The Texas Civil Rights Project, an advocacy organization based in Austin, Texas, is leading one of the largest reunification efforts in the state, seeking to reunite as many as 381 immigrants who have been separated from their children.

Texas RioGrande Legal Aid said it would continue its efforts on behalf of the three Central American parents as it awaits clarity about how the government intends to reunite the separated families.

“The point of our lawsuit (is) that they do it as compassionately and quickly as possible,” Wesevich said. “By compassionate, I mean the parents are provided with information on where their children are, how they’re being cared for.”

Short phone calls

Wesevich said one parent, a father from Guatemala, “does not know where (his daughter) is at all.”

A second parent, a Honduran mother of a 9-year-old son, has told the nonprofit that she believes her son has been moved to New York.

“She does not know where he is, except she believes that he is in New York while she is detained in El Paso, Texas,” according to court papers.

Since their separation, the mother has been allowed to speak with her son three times for about five minutes each time, according to court filings.

“He only asks when we will see each other again and begs to be with me,” the mother is quoted as saying in court documents.

“He is scared and lonely and desperate to be with me. I try to tell him everything will be OK and that I’ll see him soon but, the truth is, I don’t know what will happen with us.”

Immigration attorney Efren Olivares, with the Texas Civil Rights Project, answers a question during a news conference outside the Federal Courthouse, June 22, 2018, in McAllen, Texas.
Immigration attorney Efren Olivares, with the Texas Civil Rights Project, answers a question during a news conference outside the Federal Courthouse, June 22, 2018, in McAllen, Texas. VOA

The third parent, a Guatemalan mother of three sons, ages 2, 6 and 13, has been allowed to speak with them for 10 minutes two times each week.

“Of course her 2-year-old is unable to provide reliable information about his circumstances, and staff provide only general information to [her], nothing specific about her children’s well-being, which causes her anguish,” according to court papers.

The plaintiffs are seeking “frequent and meaningful access to or communication” with their children.

Also read: Donald Trump will soon end the DACA Programme-Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Programme for unregistered immigrants

The lawsuit, citing medical experts and court rulings, alleges that “forced separation traumatizes parents and children, and this trauma is compounded when parents and children are denied basic information about each other’s well-being and reunification prospects.” (VOA)

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Medical Students in Limbo as Young Immigrant Program Ends

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Zarna Patel poses for a portrait at the Loyola University Medical
Zarna Patel poses for a portrait at the Loyola University Medical School in Maywood, Ill, Patel, a third year student

Chicago, October 21: Medical students such as Alejandra Duran  Arreola are trying to shape the debate, and they have the backing of influential medical groups, including the American Medical Association.

Arreola dreams of becoming an OB-GYN in her home state of Georgia, where there’s a shortage of doctors and one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the U.S.

But the 26-year-old Mexican immigrant’s goal is now trapped in the debate over a program protecting hundreds of thousands of immigrants like her from deportation. Whether she becomes a doctor depends on whether Congress finds an alternative to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that President Donald Trump phased out last month.

Arreola, who was brought to the U.S. illegally at age 14, is among about 100 medical students nationwide who are enrolled in DACA, and many have become a powerful voice in the immigration debate. Their stories have resonated with leaders in Washington. Having excelled in school and gained admission into competitive medical schools, they’re on the verge of starting residencies to treat patients, a move experts say could help address the nation’s worsening doctor shortage.

“It’s mostly a tragedy of wasted talent and resources,” said Mark Kuczewski, who leads the medical education department at Loyola University’s medical school, where Arreola is in her second year. “Our country will have said, ‘You cannot go treat patients.’”

The Chicago-area medical school was the first to openly accept DACA students and has the largest concentration nationwide at 32. California and New York also have significant populations, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

DACA gives protection to about 800,000 immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children and who otherwise would lack legal permission to be in the country. The immigrants must meet strict criteria to receive two-year permits that shield them from deportation and allow them to work.

Then-President Barack Obama created DACA in 2012. Critics call it an illegal amnesty program that is taking jobs from U.S. citizens. In rescinding it last month, Trump gave lawmakers until March to come up with a replacement.

Public support for DACA is wide. A recent poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research showed that just 1 in 5 Americans want to deport DACA recipients.

Arreola took a break from her studies last month to travel to Washington with fellow Loyola medical students and DACA recipient Cesar Montelongo Hernandez to talk to stakeholders. In their meetings with lawmakers, they framed the program as a medical necessity but also want a solution for others with DACA.

A 2017 report by the Association of American Medical Colleges predicts a shortfall of between about 35,000 and 83,000 doctors in 2025. That shortage is expected to increase with population growth and aging.

Hernandez, a 28-year-old from Mexico simultaneously pursuing a Ph.D., wants to focus his research on early detection of diseases. His work permit expires next September, and he’s worried he won’t qualify for scientific research funding without the program.

“I’ve shown I deserve to be here,” said Hernandez, who met with Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin, a Democrat who’s called for Congress to quickly pass a replacement for DACA.

For Arreola it’s about returning to the state she’s called home since she was 14 and giving back to areas in need of doctors.

“My family is from there; I know those people,” Arreola said. “Those are the people that inspired to really give this a push.”

Among those Arreola met with were policy staff for Georgia Republican Sen. Johnny Isakson, who believes the Obama program was “an overreach of executive power” but also wants Congress to write a plan to protect DACA recipients.

Medical school administrators say the immigrant medical students stand out even among their accomplished peers: They’re often bilingual and bicultural, have overcome adversity and are more likely to work with underserved populations or rural areas.

“They come with a cultural competency for how to best treat the individuals from their background, whether immigrants or different races and ethnicities,” said Matthew Shick, a government relations director for the Association of American Medical Colleges. “That gets translated over to their peers in education and training.”

Zarna Patel, 24, is a third-year student at Loyola who was brought to the U.S. from India as a 3-year-old without any legal documents. Her DACA permit expires in January, and she’s trying to renew it so she can continue medical school rotations that require clinical work. If she’s able to work in U.S., Patel will work in disadvantaged areas of Illinois for four years, part of her agreement to get school loans.

“Growing up, I didn’t have insurance,” she said. “I knew what that felt like, being locked out of the whole system.”

For others, there’s added worry of being stuck with debt they can’t repay.

Marcela Zhou, who was born in Mexico after her family moved there from China, is in her third year at the University of California at Los Angeles’ medical school. She wants to work in public health.

“Can I even afford to finish medical school?” said Zhou, who was 12 when she came to the U.S. on a visitor visa that eventually expired. “It’s sort of hard sometimes to keep going.”(VOA)